Studies in American Indian Literature

Studies in American Indian Literature

This classic volume in Native American studies features essays on traditional and modern American Indian literature and provides course outlines that instructors can implement singly or sequentially.

Author: Paula Gunn Allen

Publisher: Modern Language Assn of Amer

ISBN: 0873523555

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 321

Categories: Literary Criticism

American Indian Literatures

American Indian Literatures

SCOTT (copy 2) The Hédi Bouraoui Collection in Maghrebian and Franco-Ontario Literatures is the gift of University Professor Emeritus Hédi Bouraoui.

Author: A. LaVonne Brown Ruoff

Publisher: Modern Language Assn of Amer

ISBN: 0873521927

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 380

Providing a history of Native American literature from 1772 to the present, this work describes various types of oral literatures and life histories, evaluates secondary works in the field, and includes an extensive selected bibliography. Includes an appendix of important dates in American Indian history. Index.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Southwestern American Indian Literature

Southwestern American Indian Literature

This book provides a practical approach to the teaching of Southwestern American Indian literature without simplifying its inherent challenges.

Author: Conrad Shumaker

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 0820463442

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 118

View: 509

Southwestern American Indian Literature: In the Classroom and Beyond addresses several challenges that teaching Southwestern American Indian literature presents, and suggests innovative ways of teaching the material. Drawing on the author's experiences teaching literature - both in the classroom and in the canyons of the Southwest - the book covers works ranging from the famous (Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony) to the underappreciated (George Webb's A Pima Remembers). One chapter discusses teaching Sherman Alexie's Smoke Signals along with Silko's «Yellow Woman» as world literature; another functions as a guide to organizing a travel seminar that will enable students to experience American Indian literature and culture in potentially life-changing ways. This book provides a practical approach to the teaching of Southwestern American Indian literature without simplifying its inherent challenges.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature

The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature

The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature is the most comprehensive and expansive critical handbook of Indigenous American literatures published to date.

Author: James H. Cox

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199914036

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 741

View: 642

This book explores Indigenous American literature and the development of an inter- and trans-Indigenous orientation in Native American and Indigenous literary studies. Drawing on the perspectives of scholars in the field, it seeks to reconcile tribal nation specificity, Indigenous literary nationalism, and trans-Indigenous methodologies as necessary components of post-Renaissance Native American and Indigenous literary studies. It looks at the work of Renaissance writers, including Louise Erdrich’s Tracks (1988) and Leslie Marmon Silko’s Sacred Water (1993), along with novels by S. Alice Callahan and John Milton Oskison. It also discusses Indigenous poetics and Salt Publishing’s Earthworks series, focusing on poets of the Renaissance in conversation with emerging writers. Furthermore, it introduces contemporary readers to many American Indian writers from the seventeenth to the first half of the nineteenth century, from Captain Joseph Johnson and Ben Uncas to Samson Occom, Samuel Ashpo, Henry Quaquaquid, Joseph Brant, Hendrick Aupaumut, Sarah Simon, Mary Occom, and Elijah Wimpey. The book examines Inuit literature in Inuktitut, bilingual Mexicanoh and Spanish poetry, and literature in Indian Territory, Nunavut, the Huasteca, Yucatán, and the Great Lakes region. It considers Indigenous literatures north of the Medicine Line, particularly francophone writing by Indigenous authors in Quebec. Other issues tackled by the book include racial and blood identities that continue to divide Indigenous nations and communities, as well as the role of colleges and universities in the development of Indigenous literary studies.[Oxford Handbooks].
Categories: Literary Criticism

American Indian Literature Environmental Justice and Ecocriticism

American Indian Literature  Environmental Justice  and Ecocriticism

This powerful book is one of the first to examine the intersections between literature and the environment from the perspective of the oppressions of race, class, gender, and nature, and the first to review American Indian literature from ...

Author: Joni Adamson

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816517923

Category: Social Science

Page: 213

View: 652

Although much contemporary American Indian literature examines the relationship between humans and the land, most Native authors do not set their work in the "pristine wilderness" celebrated by mainstream nature writers. Instead, they focus on settings such as reservations, open-pit mines, and contested borderlands. Drawing on her own teaching experience among Native Americans and on lessons learned from such recent scenes of confrontation as Chiapas and Black Mesa, Joni Adamson explores why what counts as "nature" is often very different for multicultural writers and activist groups than it is for mainstream environmentalists. This powerful book is one of the first to examine the intersections between literature and the environment from the perspective of the oppressions of race, class, gender, and nature, and the first to review American Indian literature from the standpoint of environmental justice and ecocriticism. By examining such texts as Sherman Alexie's short stories and Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Almanac of the Dead, Adamson contends that these works, in addition to being literary, are examples of ecological criticism that expand Euro-American concepts of nature and place. Adamson shows that when we begin exploring the differences that shape diverse cultural and literary representations of nature, we discover the challenge they present to mainstream American culture, environmentalism, and literature. By comparing the work of Native authors such as Simon Ortiz with that of environmental writers such as Edward Abbey, she reveals opportunities for more multicultural conceptions of nature and the environment. More than a work of literary criticism, this is a book about the search to find ways to understand our cultural and historical differences and similarities in order to arrive at a better agreement of what the human role in nature is and should be. It exposes the blind spots in early ecocriticism and shows the possibilities for building common groundÑ a middle placeÑ where writers, scholars, teachers, and environmentalists might come together to work for social and environmental change.
Categories: Social Science

Returning the Gift

Returning the Gift

" In compiling this volume, Bruchac invited every writer who attended the festival to submit new, unpublished work; he then selected the best of the more than 200 submissions to create a collection that includes established writers like ...

Author: Joseph Bruchac

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816514860

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 369

View: 762

An unprecedented gathering of more than 300 Native writers was held in Norman, Oklahoma, in 1992. The Returning the Gift Festival brought more Native writers together in one place than at any other time in history. "Returning the Gift," observes co-organizer Joseph Bruchac, "both demonstrated and validated our literature and our devotion to it, not just to the public, but to ourselves." In compiling this volume, Bruchac invited every writer who attended the festival to submit new, unpublished work; he then selected the best of the more than 200 submissions to create a collection that includes established writers like Duane Niatum, Simon Ortiz, Lance Henson, Elizabeth Woody, Linda Hogan, and Jeanette Armstrong, and also introduces such lesser-known or new voices as Tracy Bonneau, Jeanetta Calhoun, Kim Blaeser, and Chris Fleet. The anthology includes works from every corner of the continent, representing a wide range of tribal affiliations, languages, and cultures. By taking their peoples' literature back to them in the form of stories and songs, these writers see themselves as returning the gift of storytelling, culture, and continuance to the source from which it came. In addition to contributions by 92 writers are two introductory chapters: Joseph Bruchac comments on the current state of Native literature and the significance of the festival, and Geary Hobson traces the evolution of the event itself.
Categories: Literary Collections

Narrative Chance

Narrative Chance

Hovedsageligt om de moderne, amerikanske, indianske forfattere N. Scott Momaday, LeslieMarmon Silko, D'Arcy McNickle, Louise Erdrich, og: Gerald Vizenor.

Author: Gerald Robert Vizenor

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806125616

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 223

View: 944

Hovedsageligt om de moderne, amerikanske, indianske forfattere N. Scott Momaday, LeslieMarmon Silko, D'Arcy McNickle, Louise Erdrich, og: Gerald Vizenor.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Studies in American Indian Literatures

Studies in American Indian Literatures

Newsletter of the Association for Study of American Indian Literatures. Opitz ,
Andrea . “ James Welch ' s Fools Crow and the Imagination of PreColonial Space
. ” American Indian Quarterly 24 . 1 ( Winter 2000 ) : 126 - 40 . Owens , Louis .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105213160778

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 350

Categories: American literature

American Indian Literary Nationalism

American Indian Literary Nationalism

A study of Native literature from the perspective of national sovereignty and self-determination.

Author: Jace Weaver

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826340733

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 176

A study of Native literature from the perspective of national sovereignty and self-determination.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Contemporary American Indian Literatures the Oral Tradition

Contemporary American Indian Literatures   the Oral Tradition

A Critical Approach to American Indian Literature . ” Allen , Studies 211-24 . - "
Indian Literature and Critical Responsibility . ” Studies in American Indian
Literatures 1.1 ( 1977 ) : 3–7 . Rpt . in Studies in American Indian Literatures 5.2 (
1993 ) ...

Author: Susan Berry Brill de Ram’rez

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816519579

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 259

View: 744

A literary study of Native American literature analyzes its sources in oral tradition, offering a theory of "conversive" critical theory as a way of understanding Indian literature's themes and concerns.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Native American Renaissance

The Native American Renaissance

This collection of essays takes the measure of that efflorescence.

Author: Alan R. Velie

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806151311

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 325

The outpouring of Native American literature that followed the publication of N. Scott Momaday’s Pulitzer Prize–winning House Made of Dawn in 1968 continues unabated. Fiction and poetry, autobiography and discursive writing from such writers as James Welch, Gerald Vizenor, and Leslie Marmon Silko constitute what critic Kenneth Lincoln in 1983 termed the Native American Renaissance. This collection of essays takes the measure of that efflorescence. The contributors scrutinize writers from Momaday to Sherman Alexie, analyzing works by Native women, First Nations Canadian writers, postmodernists, and such theorists as Robert Warrior, Jace Weaver, and Craig Womack. Weaver’s own examination of the development of Native literary criticism since 1968 focuses on Native American literary nationalism. Alan R. Velie turns to the achievement of Momaday to examine the ways Native novelists have influenced one another. Post-renaissance and postmodern writers are discussed in company with newer writers such as Gordon Henry, Jr., and D. L. Birchfield. Critical essays discuss the poetry of Simon Ortiz, Kimberly Blaeser, Diane Glancy, Luci Tapahonso, and Ray A. Young Bear, as well as the life writings of Janet Campbell Hale, Carter Revard, and Jim Barnes. An essay on Native drama examines the work of Hanay Geiogamah, the Native American Theater Ensemble, and Spider Woman Theatre. In the volume’s concluding essay, Kenneth Lincoln reflects on the history of the Native American Renaissance up to and beyond his seminal work, and discusses Native literature’s legacy and future. The essays collected here underscore the vitality of Native American literature and the need for debate on theory and ideology.
Categories: History

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 is the first major volume of its kind to focus on Native literatures in a postcolonial context.

Author: Eric Cheyfitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231511025

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 448

View: 814

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 is the first major volume of its kind to focus on Native literatures in a postcolonial context. Written by a team of noted Native and non-Native scholars, these essays consider the complex social and political influences that have shaped American Indian literatures in the second half of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on core themes of identity, sovereignty, and land. In his essay comprising part I of the volume, Eric Cheyfitz argues persuasively for the necessary conjunction of Indian literatures and federal Indian law from Apess to Alexie. Part II is a comprehensive survey of five genres of literature: fiction (Arnold Krupat and Michael Elliott), poetry (Kimberly Blaeser), drama (Shari Huhndorf), nonfiction (David Murray), and autobiography (Kendall Johnson), and discusses the work of Vine Deloria Jr., N. Scott Momaday, Joy Harjo, Simon Ortiz, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gerald Vizenor, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Sherman Alexie, among many others. Drawing on historical and theoretical frameworks, the contributors examine how American Indian writers and critics have responded to major developments in American Indian life and how recent trends in Native writing build upon and integrate traditional modes of storytelling. Sure to be considered a groundbreaking contribution to the field, The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 offers both a rich critique of history and a wealth of new information and insight.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Ojibwe Activist Priest

Ojibwe  Activist  Priest

Demise of the Society of American Indians,” Studies in American Indian
Literatures 25.2 and American Indian Quarterly 37.3 (Summer 2013): 167, 178.
Yet figures of arguably lesser importance to the SAI—Laura Cornelius Kellogg,
Marie ...

Author: Tadeusz Lewandowski

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299325206

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 993

Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Handbook of Native American Literature

Handbook of Native American Literature

The Handbook of Native American Literature is a unique, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to the oral and written literatures of Native Americans. It lays the perfect foundation for understanding the works of Native American writers.

Author: Andrew Wiget

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135639174

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 616

View: 782

The Handbook of Native American Literature is a unique, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to the oral and written literatures of Native Americans. It lays the perfect foundation for understanding the works of Native American writers. Divided into three major sections, Native American Oral Literatures, The Historical Emergence of Native American Writing, and A Native American Renaissance: 1967 to the Present, it includes 22 lengthy essays, written by scholars of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. The book features reports on the oral traditions of various tribes and topics such as the relation of the Bible, dreams, oratory, humor, autobiography, and federal land policies to Native American literature. Eight additional essays cover teaching Native American literature, new fiction, new theater, and other important topics, and there are bio-critical essays on more than 40 writers ranging from William Apes (who in the early 19th century denounced white society's treatment of his people) to contemporary poet Ray Young Bear. Packed with information that was once scattered and scarce, the Handbook of Native American Literature -a valuable one-volume resource-is sure to appeal to everyone interested in Native American history, culture, and literature. Previously published in cloth as The Dictionary of Native American Literature
Categories: Literary Criticism

Blood Narrative

Blood Narrative

DIVCompares the discourses of indigeneity used by Maori and Native American peoples and proposes the concept treaty discourse to characterize the relevant form of postcolonial situation./div “Chadwick Allen traces the ‘inseparable ...

Author: Chadwick Allen

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822329476

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 119

DIVCompares the discourses of indigeneity used by Maori and Native American peoples and proposes the concept treaty discourse to characterize the relevant form of postcolonial situation./div
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cambridge History of Native American Literature Volume 1

The Cambridge History of Native American Literature  Volume 1

Native American literature has always been uniquely embattled. It is marked by divergent opinions about what constitutes authenticity, sovereignty, and even literature.

Author: Melanie Benson Taylor

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108643184

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 433

Native American literature has always been uniquely embattled. It is marked by divergent opinions about what constitutes authenticity, sovereignty, and even literature. It announces a culture beset by paradox: simultaneously primordial and postmodern; oral and inscribed; outmoded and novel. Its texts are a site of political struggle, shifting to meet external and internal expectations. This Cambridge History endeavors to capture and question the contested character of Indigenous texts and the way they are evaluated. It delineates significant periods of literary and cultural development in four sections: “Traces & Removals” (pre-1870s); “Assimilation and Modernity” (1879-1967); “Native American Renaissance” (post-1960s); and “Visions & Revisions” (21st century). These rubrics highlight how Native literatures have evolved alongside major transitions in federal policy toward the Indian, and via contact with broader cultural phenomena such, as the American Civil Rights movement. There is a balance between a history of canonical authors and traditions, introducing less-studied works and themes, and foregrounding critical discussions, approaches, and controversies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading the Fire

Reading the Fire

This revised edition of a book first published to critical acclaim in 1983 includes four new essays.

Author: Jarold Ramsey

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295803500

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 983

Reading the Fire engages America�s �first literatures,� traditional Native American tales and legends, as literary art and part of our collective imaginative heritage. This revised edition of a book first published to critical acclaim in 1983 includes four new essays. Drawing on ethnographic data and regional folklore, Jarold Ramsey moves from origin and trickster narratives and Indian ceremonial texts, into interpretations of stories from the Nez Perce, Clackamas Chinook, Coos, Wasco, and Tillamook repertories, concluding with a set of essays on the neglected subject of Native literary responses to contact with Euroamericans. In his finely worked, erudite analyses, he mediates between an author-centered, print-based narrative tradition and one that is oral, anonymous, and tribal, adducing parallels between Native texts and works by Shakespeare, Yeats, Beckett, and Faulkner.
Categories: Social Science