Stick and Rudder an Explanation of the Art of Flying

Stick and Rudder  an Explanation of the Art of Flying

Explains the basics of flying and answers questions such as, "Why do airplanes stall?" and "What is the rudder for?"

Author: Wolfgang Langewiesche

Publisher:

ISBN: PSU:000059704416

Category: Aerodynamics

Page: 406

View: 137

Explains the basics of flying and answers questions such as, "Why do airplanes stall?" and "What is the rudder for?"
Categories: Aerodynamics

Stick and Rudder An Explanation of the Art of Flying

Stick and Rudder  An Explanation of the Art of Flying

The visual clues by which an experienced pilot unconsciously judges: how you can quickly learn to use them. "The Spot that does not move." This is the first statement of this phenomenon.

Author: Wolfgang Langewiesche

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional

ISBN: 0070362408

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 390

View: 763

WHAT'S IN STICK AND RUDDER: The invisible secret of all heavier-than-air flight: the Angle of Attack. What it is, and why it can't be seen. How lift is made, and what the pilot has to do with it. Why airplanes stall How do you know you're about to stall? The landing approach. How the pilot's eye functions in judging the approach. The visual clues by which an experienced pilot unconsciously judges: how you can quickly learn to use them. "The Spot that does not move." This is the first statement of this phenomenon. A foolproof method of making a landing approach across pole lines and trees. The elevator and the throttle. One controls the speed, the other controls climb and descent. Which is which? The paradox of the glide. By pointing the nose down less steeply, you descend more steeply. By pointing the nose down more steeply, you can glide further. What's the rudder for? The rudder does NOT turn the airplane the way a boat's rudder turns the boat. Then what does it do? How a turn is flown. The role of ailerons, rudder, and elevator in making a turn. The landing--how it's made. The visual clues that tell you where the ground is. The "tail-dragger" landing gear and what's tricky about it. This is probably the only analysis of tail-draggers now available to those who want to fly one. The tricycle landing gear and what's so good about it. A strong advocacy of the tricycle gear written at a time when almost all civil airplanes were taildraggers. Why the airplane doesn't feel the wind. Why the airplane usually flies a little sidewise. Plus: a chapter on Air Accidents by Leighton Collins, founder and editor of AIR FACTS. His analyses of aviation's safety problems have deeply influenced pilots and aeronautical engineers and have contributed to the benign characteristics of today's airplane. Stick and Rudder is the first exact analysis of the art of flying ever attempted. It has been continously in print for thirty-three years. It shows precisely what the pilot does when he flies, just how he does it, and why. Because the basics are largely unchanging, the book therefore is applicable to large airplanes and small, old airplanes and new, and is of interest not only to the learner but also to the accomplished pilot and to the instructor himself. When Stick and Rudder first came out, some of its contents were considered highly controversial. In recent years its formulations have become widely accepted. Pilots and flight instructors have found that the book works. Today several excellent manuals offer the pilot accurate and valuable technical information. But Stick and Rudder remains the leading think-book on the art of flying. One thorough reading of it is the equivalent of many hours of practice.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Stick and Rudder An Explanation of the Art of Flying

Stick and Rudder  An Explanation of the Art of Flying

Chapter 18 THE DANGERS OF THE AIR By LEIGHTON COLLINS OW much of an art flying is , how difficult it is to work stick and rudder correctly , can be gleaned from understanding , in proper perspective , the cases when the art of flying ...

Author: Wolfgang Langewiesche

Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

ISBN: 0070362408

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 412

View: 934

In the early 1940's, Wolfgang Langewiesche wrote a series of articles in Air Facts analyzing the various aspects of piloting techniques. Based on these articles, Langewiesche's classic work on the art of flying was published in 1944. This book explains precisely what pilots do when they fly, just how they do it, and why. These basics are largely unchanging. The book applies to large airplanes and small, old airplanes and new, and is of interest not only to the learner but also to the accomplished pilot and instructor. Today, several excellent manuals offer the pilot accurate and valuable technical information. But Stick and Rudder remains the leading think-book on the art of flying.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Weekend Pilots

Weekend Pilots

... but the very meaning of life itself.2 Although they learned to fly a quarter of a century apart, and although their ... Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying.4 Smith's and Ackerman's accounts reveal something else ...

Author: Alan Meyer

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421418599

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 159

The inside story of the hypermasculine world of American private aviation. In 1960, 97 percent of private pilots were men. More than half a century later, this figure has barely changed. In Weekend Pilots, Alan Meyer provides an engaging account of the postWorld War II aviation community. Drawing on public records, trade association journals, newspaper accounts, and private papers and interviews, Meyer takes readers inside a white, male circle of the initiated that required exceptionally high skill levels, that celebrated facing and overcoming risk, and that encouraged fierce personal independence. The Second World War proved an important turning point in popularizing private aviation. Military flight schools and postwar GI-Bill flight training swelled the ranks of private pilots with hundreds of thousands of young, mostly middle-class men. Formal flight instruction screened and acculturated aspiring fliers to meet a masculine norm that traced its roots to prewar barnstorming and wartime combat training. After the war, the aviation community's response to aircraft designs played a significant part in the technological development of personal planes. Meyer also considers the community of pilots outside the cockpit—from the time-honored tradition of "hangar flying" at local airports to air shows to national conventions of private fliers—to argue that almost every aspect of private aviation reinforced the message that flying was by, for, and about men. The first scholarly book to examine in detail the role of masculinity in aviation, Weekend Pilots adds new dimensions to our understanding of embedded gender and its long-term effects.
Categories: History

Flying Magazine

Flying Magazine

86 wougawatowo MAKE FLYING SAFER, EASIER For You Stick and Rudder An Explanation of the Art of Flying by WOLFGANG LANGEWIESCHE Research Pilot for Kollsman Instrument Company *T. His book, which has become the standard text in its field, ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 112

View: 108

Categories:

Scenario Based Training with X Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator

Scenario Based Training with X Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator

You just can't count the time you spend “flying” X-Plane or FSX on a PC toward the requirements for a pilot ... in such classic texts as Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying by Wolfgang Langeweische (McGraw-Hill, 1990).

Author: Bruce Williams

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118233290

Category: Computers

Page: 624

View: 668

Fly toward pilot certification with these real-world scenario exercises Although PC-based flight simulations have been available for 30 years, many pilots, instructors, and flight schools don't understand how best to use these tools in real-world flight training and pilot proficiency programs. This invaluable reference bridges the gap between simulation tools and real-world situations by presenting hands-on, scenario-based exercises and training tips for the private pilot certificate and instrument rating. As the first of its kind based on FAA-Industry Training Standards (FITS), this book steers its focus on a scenario-based curriculum that emphasizes real-world situations. Experienced pilot and author Bruce Williams ultimately aims to engage the pilot, reinforce the "realistic" selling point of PC-based flight simulations, while also complementing the FAA-approved FITS syllabi. Serves as essential reading for pilots who want to make effective use of simulation in their training while expanding their skill level and enjoyment of flying Covers private pilot real-world scenarios and instrument rating scenarios Includes a guide to recommended websites and other resources Features helpful charts as well as a glossary You'll take off towards pilot certification with this invaluable book by your side.
Categories: Computers

Free Flight

Free Flight

8 The best explanation of stalls, and most other aspects of the physics of flight, is in Wolfgang Langewiesche's Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying (New York: McGraw Hill, 1976). 9 In normal flying circumstances, ...

Author: James Fallows

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780786741755

Category: Transportation

Page: 272

View: 870

The troubles of the airline system have become acute in the post-terrorist era. As the average cost of a flight has come down in the last twenty years, the airlines have survived by keeping planes full and funneling traffic through a centralized hub-and-spoke routing system. Virtually all of the technological innovation in airplanes in the last thirty years has been devoted to moving passengers more efficiently between major hubs. But what was left out of this equation was the convenience and flexibility of the average traveler. Now, because of heightened security, hours of waiting are tacked onto each trip. As James Fallows vividly explains, a technological revolution is under way that will relieve this problem. Free Flight features the stories of three groups who are inventing and building the future of all air travel: NASA, Cirrus Design in Duluth, Minnesota, and Eclipse Aviation in Albuquerque, New Mexico. These ventures should make it possible for more people to travel the way corporate executives have for years: in small jet planes, from the airport that's closest to their home or office directly to the airport closest to where they really want to go. This will be possible because of a product now missing from the vast array of flying devices: small, radically inexpensive jet planes, as different from airliners as personal computers are from mainframes. And, as Fallows explains in a new preface, a system that avoids the congestion of the overloaded hub system will offer advantages in speed, convenience, and especially security in the new environment of air travel.
Categories: Transportation

Flying

Flying

I AM SOMETIMES asked to explain the secret of the happiness that Albertine and I have found in each other's company ... unlike Wolfgang Langewiesche, who, in his Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying, disparaged lift.

Author: Eric Kraft

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 9781429938389

Category: Fiction

Page: 845

View: 928

Critics have compared him to Proust, Pynchon, and Fred Astaire--an artful, slyly intelligent, wildly inventive observer of Americana. Now Eric Kraft has landed an ambitious comedy set both in our present and in an alternative 1950s universe--Flying. It is the tail end of the 1950s, and in the town of Babbington, New York, a young dreamer named Peter Leroy has set out to build a flying motorcycle, using a design ripped from the pages of Impractical Craftsman magazine. This two-wheeled wonder will carry him not only to such faraway places as New mexico and the Summer Institute in Mathematics, Physics, and Weaponry, but deep into the heart of commercialized American culture, and return him to Babbington a hero. More than forty years later, as Babbington is about to rebuild itself as a theme park commemorating his historic flight, Peter must return home to set the record straight, and confess that his flight did not match the legend that it inspired. Drawing together Eric Kraft's previously published Taking Off and On the Wing with the brand-new final part of the story, Flying Home, Flying is a buoyant comedy of remarkable wingspan, a hilarious story of hoaxes, digressions, do-it-yourself engineering, and the wilds of memory--and a great satire of magical thinking in America.
Categories: Fiction

Engineering Analysis of Flight Vehicles

Engineering Analysis of Flight Vehicles

... sixth edition, New York: Dover Publications Lanczos, C., 1962, Variational Principles of Mechanics, second edition, Toronto: University of Toronto Press Langewiesche, W., 1944, Stick and Rudder, An Explanation of the Art of Flying, ...

Author: Holt Ashley

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486672137

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 402

View: 207

Excellent graduate-level text explores virtually every important subject in the fields of subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aerodynamics and dynamics. Demonstrates how these topics interface and complement one another in atmospheric flight vehicle design. Includes a broad selection of helpful problems. "A fine book." -- Canadian Aeronautics and Space Journal. 1974 edition.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Dead Reckoning

Dead Reckoning

Wolfgang Langewiesche, Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying (New York: McGraw- Hill, 1990), 163; Crouch and Jakab, The Wright Brothers, 91. 48. Tom D. Crouch, The Bishop's Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright (New ...

Author: Diane Vaughan

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226796543

Category: Social Science

Page: 694

View: 426

Vaughan unveils the complicated and high-pressure world of air traffic controllers as they navigate technology and political and public climates, and shows how they keep the skies so safe. When two airplanes were flown into the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2001, Americans watched in uncomprehending shock as first responders struggled to react to the situation on the ground. Congruently, another remarkable and heroic feat was taking place in the air: more than six hundred and fifty air traffic control facilities across the country coordinated their efforts to ground four thousand flights in just two hours—an achievement all the more impressive considering the unprecedented nature of the task. In Dead Reckoning, Diane Vaughan explores the complex work of air traffic controllers, work that is built upon a close relationship between human organizational systems and technology and is remarkably safe given the high level of risk. Vaughan observed the distinct skill sets of air traffic controllers and the ways their workplaces changed to adapt to technological developments and public and political pressures. She chronicles the ways these forces affected their jobs, from their relationships with one another and the layouts of their workspace to their understanding of their job and its place in society. The result is a nuanced and engaging look at an essential role that demands great coordination, collaboration, and focus—a role that technology will likely never be able to replace. Even as the book conveys warnings about complex systems and the liabilities of technological and organizational innovation, it shows the kinds of problem-solving solutions that evolved over time and the importance of people.
Categories: Social Science