Spirits of Just Men

Mountaineers, Liquor Bosses, and Lawmen in the Moonshine Capital of the World

Author: Charles D. Thompson Jr.

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209526X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3515

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Spirits of Just Men tells the story of moonshine in 1930s America, as seen through the remarkable location of Franklin County, Virginia, a place that many still refer to as the "moonshine capital of the world." Charles D. Thompson Jr. chronicles the Great Moonshine Conspiracy Trial of 1935, which made national news and exposed the far-reaching and pervasive tendrils of Appalachia's local moonshine economy. Thompson, whose ancestors were involved in the area's moonshine trade and trial as well as local law enforcement, uses the event as a stepping-off point to explore Blue Ridge Mountain culture, economy, and political engagement in the 1930s. Drawing from extensive oral histories and local archival material, he illustrates how the moonshine trade was a rational and savvy choice for struggling farmers and community members during the Great Depression. Local characters come alive through this richly colorful narrative, including the stories of Miss Ora Harrison, a key witness for the defense and an Episcopalian missionary to the region, and Elder Goode Hash, an itinerant Primitive Baptist preacher and juror in a related murder trial. Considering the complex interactions of religion, economics, local history, Appalachian culture, and immigration, Thompson's sensitive analysis examines the people and processes involved in turning a basic agricultural commodity into such a sought-after and essentially American spirit.
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The SAGE Encyclopedia of Alcohol

Social, Cultural, and Historical Perspectives

Author: Scott C. Martin

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483331083

Category: Reference

Page: 1704

View: 5426

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Alcohol consumption goes to the very roots of nearly all human societies. Different countries and regions have become associated with different sorts of alcohol, for instance, the “beer culture” of Germany, the “wine culture” of France, Japan and saki, Russia and vodka, the Caribbean and rum, or the “moonshine culture” of Appalachia. Wine is used in religious rituals, and toasts are used to seal business deals or to celebrate marriages and state dinners. However, our relation with alcohol is one of love/hate. We also regulate it and tax it, we pass laws about when and where it’s appropriate, we crack down severely on drunk driving, and the United States and other countries tried the failed “Noble Experiment” of Prohibition. While there are many encyclopedias on alcohol, nearly all approach it as a substance of abuse, taking a clinical, medical perspective (alcohol, alcoholism, and treatment). The SAGE Encyclopedia of Alcohol examines the history of alcohol worldwide and goes beyond the historical lens to examine alcohol as a cultural and social phenomenon, as well—both for good and for ill—from the earliest days of humankind.
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The Edible South

The Power of Food and the Making of an American Region

Author: Marcie Cohen Ferris

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469617684

Category: Cooking

Page: 496

View: 4702

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Discusses how food has shaped Southern identity, including the food slaves served in the Plantation South, how home economics and domestic science became part of the school curriculum in the South, and Southern-style food counterculture.
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Cornbread Nation 6

Author: Brett Anderson,John T. Edge

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820342610

Category: Cooking

Page: 297

View: 7267

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A colorful celebration of Southern foods, Southern cooking and the people and traditions behind them gathers the best of food writing from magazines, newspapers, books and journals, with contributions by Molly O'Neill, Calvin Trillin, Michael Pollan, Kim Severson and others. Original.
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Gentlemen Bootleggers

The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition, and a Small Town in Cahoots

Author: Bryce Bauer

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613748515

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5977

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During Prohibition, while Al Capone was rising to worldwide prominence as Public Enemy Number One, the townspeople of rural Templeton, Iowa—population just 418—were busy with a bootlegging empire of their own. Led by Joe Irlbeck, the whip-smart and gregarious son of a Bavarian immigrant, the outfit of farmers, small merchants, and even the church Monsignor worked together to create a whiskey so excellent it was ordered by name: Templeton Rye. Gentlemen Bootleggers tells a never-before-told tale of ingenuity, bootstrapping, and perseverance in one small town, showcasing a group of immigrants who embraced the American ideals of self-reliance, dynamism, and democratic justice. It relies on previously classified Prohibition Bureau investigation files, federal court case files, extensive newspaper archive research, and a recently disclosed interview with kingpin Joe Irlbeck. Unlike other Prohibition-era tales of big-city gangsters, it provides an important reminder that bootlegging wasn’t only about glory and riches, but could be in the service of a higher goal: producing the best whiskey money could buy.
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