Sir Henry Lee 1533 1611 Elizabethan Courtier

Sir Henry Lee  1533 1611   Elizabethan Courtier

This is the only biography of Sir Henry Lee in print, and explores the interaction of politics, culture and society of the Elizabethan court through the eyes of a popular and long-serving courtier.

Author: Sue Simpson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317054726

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 132

A favourite of Queen Elizabeth I, Sir Henry Lee was known as ’the most accomplished cavaliero’ in England. This handsome, entertaining and highly convivial gentleman was an important participant in life at court as Elizabeth’s tournament champion. He created the spectacular Accession Day tournaments held annually before London crowds of more than 8,000 people, was Lieutenant of Elizabeth’s palace at Woodstock, and Master of the Armoury at the Tower of London during the Spanish Armada. This is the only biography of Sir Henry Lee in print, and explores the interaction of politics, culture and society of the Elizabethan court through the eyes of a popular and long-serving courtier. Indeed, few other courtiers managed to live such a long and satisfying life, and although this study of Sir Henry’s life shows a diverse nature typical of many Elizabethan gentlemen - his travels to the courts of Italy, his knowledge of arms and armour, his delight in the world of emblems and symbolism, his close association with Philip Sidney, and his intimate relationship with a notorious woman at least thirty years his junior - it also questions what it meant to be a courtier. Was the game actually worth the candle?
Categories: History

Sir Henry Lee 1533 1611 Elizabethan Courtier

Sir Henry Lee  1533   1611   Elizabethan Courtier

When she remarried in 1618, Sir Henry Lee (Bart.) was swift to pounce. He discovered that John Finch was still alive, and the new Sir Henry had a charge of ...

Author: Sue Simpson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317054733

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 579

A favourite of Queen Elizabeth I, Sir Henry Lee was known as ’the most accomplished cavaliero’ in England. This handsome, entertaining and highly convivial gentleman was an important participant in life at court as Elizabeth’s tournament champion. He created the spectacular Accession Day tournaments held annually before London crowds of more than 8,000 people, was Lieutenant of Elizabeth’s palace at Woodstock, and Master of the Armoury at the Tower of London during the Spanish Armada. This is the only biography of Sir Henry Lee in print, and explores the interaction of politics, culture and society of the Elizabethan court through the eyes of a popular and long-serving courtier. Indeed, few other courtiers managed to live such a long and satisfying life, and although this study of Sir Henry’s life shows a diverse nature typical of many Elizabethan gentlemen - his travels to the courts of Italy, his knowledge of arms and armour, his delight in the world of emblems and symbolism, his close association with Philip Sidney, and his intimate relationship with a notorious woman at least thirty years his junior - it also questions what it meant to be a courtier. Was the game actually worth the candle?
Categories: History

The Elizabethan Country House Entertainment

The Elizabethan Country House Entertainment

... Sir Henry Lee (15331611): Elizabethan Courtier (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014), especially 72–93. 16 Lee was appointed lieutenant of Woodstock manor in 1571.

Author: Elizabeth Zeman Kolkovich

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316712542

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 233

This is the first full-length critical study of country house entertainment, a genre central to late Elizabethan politics. It shows how the short plays staged for the Queen at country estates like Kenilworth Castle and Elvetham shaped literary trends and intervened in political debates, including whether women made good politicians and what roles the church and local culture should play in definitions of England. In performance and print, country house entertainments facilitated political negotiations, rethought gender roles, and crafted regional and national identities. In its investigation of how the hosts used performances to negotiate local and national politics, the book also sheds light on how and why such entertainments enabled female performance and authorship at a time when English women did not write or perform commercial plays. Written in a lively and accessible style, this is fascinating reading for scholars and students of early modern literature, theatre, and women's history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland

The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland

McGurk, John, “Hugh O'Neill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone and Captain Thomas Lee,” ... Simpson, Sue, Sir Henry Lee (15331611): Elizabethan Courtier (Farnham, UK, ...

Author: James Charles Roy

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526770752

Category: History

Page: 668

View: 319

This is the story of the 'failed' British Empire in Ireland and the sad end of the Tudor reign. The relationship between England and Ireland has been marked by turmoil ever since the 5th century, when Irish raiders kidnapped St. Patrick. Perhaps the most consequential chapter in this saga was the subjugation of the island during the 16th century, and particularly efforts associated with the long reign of Queen Elizabeth I, the reverberations of which remain unsettled even today. This is the story of that ‘First British Empire’. The saga of the Elizabethan conquest has rarely received the attention it deserves, long overshadowed by more ‘glamorous’ events that challenged the queen, most especially those involving Catholic Spain and France, superpowers with vastly more resources than Protestant England. Ireland was viewed as a peripheral theater, a haven for Catholic heretics and a potential ‘back door’ for foreign invasions. Lord deputies sent by the queen were tormented by such fears, and reacted with an iron hand. Their cadres of subordinates, including poets and writers as gifted as Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Walter Raleigh, were all corrupted in the process, their humanist values disfigured by the realities of Irish life as they encountered them through the lens of conquest and appropriation. These men considered the future of Ireland to be an extension of the British state, as seen in the ‘salon’ at Bryskett’s Cottage, outside Dublin, where guests met to pore over the ‘Irish Question’. But such deliberations were rewarded by no final triumph, only debilitating warfare that stretched the entire length of Elizabeth’s rule. This is the story of revolt, suppression, atrocities and genocide, and ends with an ailing, dispirited queen facing internal convulsions and an empty treasury. Her death saw the end of the Tudor dynasty, marked not by victory over the great enemy Spain, but by ungovernable Ireland – the first colonial ‘failed state’.
Categories: History

Du Bartas Legacy in England and Scotland

Du Bartas  Legacy in England and Scotland

Sir Henry Lee (15331611): Elizabethan Courtier (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014). Sinfield, Alan. Sidney and Du Bartas, Comparative Literature 27 (1975), 8–20.

Author: Peter Auger

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198827818

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 287

Guillaume de Saluste Du Bartas was the most popular and widely-imitated poet in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England and Scotland. C. S. Lewis felt that a reconsideration of his works' British reception was 'long overdue' back in the 1950s, and this study finally provides the first comprehensive account of how English-speaking authors read, translated, imitated, and eventually discarded Du Bartas' model for Protestant poetry. The first part shows that Du Bartas' friendship with James VI and I was key to his later popularity. Du Bartas' poetry symbolized a transnational Protestant literary culture in Huguenot France and Britain. Through Jamesâ intervention, Scottish literary tastes had a significant impact in England. Later chapters assess how Sidney, Spenser, Milton, and many other poets justified writing poetic fictions in reaction to Du Bartas' austere emphasis on scriptural truth. These chapters give equal attention to how Du Bartas' example offered a route into original verse composition for male and female poets across the literate population. Du Bartas' Legacy in England and Scotland responds to recent developments in transnational and translation studies, the history of reading, women's writing, religious literature, and manuscript studies. It argues that Du Bartas' legacy deserves far greater prominence than it has previously received because it offers a richer, more democratic, and more accurate view of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English, Scottish, and French literature and religious culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Unwritten Poetry

Unwritten Poetry

Sir Henry Lee (15331611): Elizabethan Courtier (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014). Smith, Bruce R. The Acoustic World of Early Modern England.

Author: Scott A. Trudell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192571694

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 761

Vocal music was at the heart of English Renaissance poetry and drama. Virtuosic actor-singers redefined the theatrical culture of William Shakespeare and his peers. Composers including William Byrd and Henry Lawes shaped the transmission of Renaissance lyric verse. Poets from Philip Sidney to John Milton were fascinated by the disorienting influx of musical performance into their works. Musical performance was a driving force behind the period's theatrical and poetic movements, yet its importance to literary history has long been ignored or effaced. This book reveals the impact of vocalists and composers upon the poetic culture of early modern England by studying the media through which—and by whom—its songs were made. In a literary field that was never confined to writing, media were not limited to material texts. Scott Trudell argues that the media of Renaissance poetry can be conceived as any node of transmission from singer's larynx to actor's body. Through his study of song, Trudell outlines a new approach to Renaissance poetry and drama that is grounded not simply in performance history or book history but in a more synthetic media history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Routledge Companion to Women Sex and Gender in the Early British Colonial World

Routledge Companion to Women  Sex  and Gender in the Early British Colonial World

Sir Henry Lee (15331611): Elizabethan Courtier. Farnham: Routledge, 2014. Smith, Rosalind. “Reading Mary Stuart's Casket Sonnets: Reception, Authorship, ...

Author: Kimberly Anne Coles

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317041016

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 330

View: 584

All of the essays in this volume capture the body in a particular attitude: in distress, vulnerability, pain, pleasure, labor, health, reproduction, or preparation for death. They attend to how the body’s transformations affect the social and political arrangements that surround it. And they show how apprehension of the body – in social and political terms – gives it shape.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Periodical

The Periodical

Sir Henry Lee . An Elizabethan Portrait . By Sir E . K . CHAMBERS . 1936 . Demy
8vo , pp . 340 , 5 plates . Clarendon Press . The life of a famous Elizabethan
courtier , Sir Henry Lee , Master of the Armoury . He lived from 1533 to 1611 ,
served ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015079754563

Category: Books

Page:

View: 295

Categories: Books

Renaissance Romance

Renaissance Romance

... Elizabethan courtiers found themselves using habitually with their queen. ... Sir Henry Lee (15331611), the principal propagator of the Elizabethan ...

Author: Nandini Das

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409410140

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 242

View: 543

Renaissance Romance examines how and why the fears and expectations surrounding the old genre of romance resonated in early modern England. Examining a range of texts and the fiction of Sir Philip Sidney, Robert Greene and Lady Mary Wroth in particular, Das illustrates the sheer cultural persistence of romance, and reveals how a generational consciousness inherent in the genre transformed the new prose fiction of the period.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Model of Poesy

The Model of Poesy

68 ODNB, 'Lee, Sir Henry (15331611)'. 69 Chambers, 305. 70 Foradiscussion seeSteven W. May, The Elizabethan courtier poets (Columbia, Mo., 1991),355–7.

Author: William Scott

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107469266

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 140

The Model of Poesy is one of the most exciting literary discoveries of recent years. A manuscript treatise on poetics written by William Scott in 1599, at the end of the most revolutionary decade in English literary history, it includes rich discussions of the works of Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare and their contemporaries. Scott's work presents a powerful and coherent theoretical account of all aspects of poetics, from the nature of representation to the rules of versification, with a commitment to relating theory to contemporary practice. For Scott, any theory of literature must make sense not of the classics but of what English writers are doing now: Scott is at the same time the most scholarly and the most relevant of English Renaissance critics. In this groundbreaking edition, Gavin Alexander presents a text of The Model of Poesy framed by a detailed introduction and an extensive commentary, which together demonstrate the range and value of Scott's thought.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Art of Law in Shakespeare

The Art of Law in Shakespeare

150 Henry Lee (15331611) was one of Elizabeth's favourite courtiers. ... Sir Henry Lee: An Elizabethan Portrait (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1936).

Author: Paul Raffield

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781509905485

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 429

Through an examination of five plays by Shakespeare, Paul Raffield analyses the contiguous development of common law and poetic drama during the first decade of Jacobean rule. The broad premise of The Art of Law in Shakespeare is that the 'artificial reason' of law was a complex art form that shared the same rhetorical strategy as the plays of Shakespeare. Common law and Shakespearean drama of this period employed various aesthetic devices to capture the imagination and the emotional attachment of their respective audiences. Common law of the Jacobean era, as spoken in the law courts, learnt at the Inns of Court and recorded in the law reports, used imagery that would have been familiar to audiences of Shakespeare's plays. In its juridical form, English law was intrinsically dramatic, its adversarial mode of expression being founded on an agonistic model. Conversely, Shakespeare borrowed from the common law some of its most critical themes: justice, legitimacy, sovereignty, community, fairness, and (above all else) humanity. Each chapter investigates a particular aspect of the common law, seen through the lens of a specific play by Shakespeare. Topics include the unprecedented significance of rhetorical skills to the practice and learning of common law (Love's Labour's Lost); the early modern treason trial as exemplar of the theatre of law (Macbeth); the art of law as the legitimate distillation of the law of nature (The Winter's Tale); the efforts of common lawyers to create an image of nationhood from both classical and Judeo-Christian mythography (Cymbeline); and the theatrical device of the island as microcosm of the Jacobean state and the project of imperial expansion (The Tempest).
Categories: Law

A Guide to Tudor Jacobean Portraits

A Guide to Tudor   Jacobean Portraits

Sir Henry Lee ( 1533-1611 ) The portraits of Elizabethan courtiers frequently
include items of costume and jewellery that were designed to show loyalty to the
Queen , such as miniatures or cameos with her portrait . This portrait of the
courtier ...

Author: Tarnya Cooper

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015082754881

Category: Great Britain

Page: 48

View: 326

This accessible and visually stunning guide puts Tudor and Jacobean portraits into historical context. Many of these important works are in museums and country houses across the UK, and this introductory guide invites the reader to look afresh and to understand why and how they were created.
Categories: Great Britain

A Catalogue of books

A Catalogue of      books

Author: Bernard Quaritch (Firm)

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015076074312

Category:

Page:

View: 491

Categories:

The Elizabethan Courtier Poets

The Elizabethan Courtier Poets

11 Lee , Sir Henry ( 1533-1611 ) Sir Henry may well have come to the queen's
attention by the twelfth year of the reign ( 1569-1570 ) , when he received the
manors of Spillbury and Shipton by lease from the crown , perhaps as a reward
for his ...

Author: Steven W. May

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015019398620

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 407

View: 992

Although the term courtier poet is widely used in discussions of Elizabethan literature, it has never been carefully defined. In this study, Steven W.May isolates the elite social environment of the court by defining the words court and courtier as they were understood by Tudor aristocrats. He examines the types of poems that these poets wrote, the occasions for which they wrote, and the nature of the poems themselves.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Sir Henry Lee

Sir Henry Lee

An Elizabethan Portrait Edmund Kerchever Chambers. II THE MAKING OF A
COURTIER ENRY LEE , the main subject of this chronicle , is .noted as 17 in his
father's inquisition ... parentage , and take note of his mother's marriage
settlement on 6 July 1532 , we may safely place his birth about March 1533. ...
They give Lee eighty years of life and sixty of knighthood before his death on 12
February 1611.

Author: Edmund Kerchever Chambers

Publisher: Oxford, The Clarendon Press

ISBN: UOM:39015024857743

Category: English literature

Page: 328

View: 116

Categories: English literature