Sherman s March to the Sea 1864

Sherman s March to the Sea 1864

Riding on the wave of his victory at Atlanta, Union General W. T. Sherman abandoned his supply lines in an attempt to push his forces into Confederate territory and take Savannah.

Author: David Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781782005186

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 660

Riding on the wave of his victory at Atlanta, Union General W. T. Sherman abandoned his supply lines in an attempt to push his forces into Confederate territory and take Savannah. During their 285-mile 'March to the Sea' the army lived off the land and destroyed all war-making capabilities of the enemy en route. Despite the controversy surrounding it, the march was a success. Supported by photographs, detailed maps, and artwork, this title explores the key personalities and engagements of the march and provides a detailed analysis of the campaign that marked the 'beginning of the end' of the Civil War.
Categories: History

Sherman s March in Myth and Memory

Sherman s March in Myth and Memory

Sherman's March in Myth and Memory examines the emergence of various myths surrounding one of the most enduring campaigns in the annals of military history.

Author: Edward Caudill

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442201279

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 984

General William Tecumseh Sherman's devastating "March to the Sea" in 1864 burned a swath through the cities and countryside of Georgia and into the history of the American Civil War. As they moved from Atlanta to Savannah—destroying homes, buildings, and crops; killing livestock; and consuming supplies—Sherman and the Union army ignited not only southern property, but also imaginations, in both the North and the South. By the time of the general's death in 1891, when one said "The March," no explanation was required. That remains true today. Legends and myths about Sherman began forming during the March itself, and took more definitive shape in the industrial age in the late-nineteenth century. Sherman's March in Myth and Memory examines the emergence of various myths surrounding one of the most enduring campaigns in the annals of military history. Edward Caudill and Paul Ashdown provide a brief overview of Sherman's life and his March, but their focus is on how these myths came about—such as one description of a "60-mile wide path of destruction"—and how legends about Sherman and his campaign have served a variety of interests. Caudill and Ashdown argue that these myths have been employed by groups as disparate as those endorsing the Old South aristocracy and its "Lost Cause," and by others who saw the March as evidence of the superiority of industrialism in modern America over a retreating agrarianism. Sherman's March in Myth and Memory looks at the general's treatment in the press, among historians, on stage and screen, and in literature, from the time of the March to the present day. The authors show us the many ways in which Sherman has been portrayed in the media and popular culture, and how his devastating March has been stamped into our collective memory.
Categories: History

Sherman s March to the Sea

Sherman s March to the Sea

Information packet designed to support a study and/or staff ride to the sites related to MG William T. Sherman's Savannah Campaign, better known as the "March to the Sea" conducted during November and December 1864.

Author: US Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon. Command Historian Office

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:82120493

Category: Georgia

Page: 266

View: 868

Information packet designed to support a study and/or staff ride to the sites related to MG William T. Sherman's Savannah Campaign, better known as the "March to the Sea" conducted during November and December 1864.
Categories: Georgia

Sherman s March to the Sea

Sherman s March to the Sea

In studying a main element of the Lost Cause view of the Civil War, award-winning author John F. Marszalek recounts the March's destructive details, analyzes William T. Sherman's strategy, and describes white and black southern reaction.

Author: John F. Marszalek

Publisher: State House Press

ISBN: UOM:39015061206374

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 613

In the fall of 1864 after his triumphant capture of Atlanta, Union Gen. William T. Sherman mobilized 62,000 of his veteran troops and waged destructive war across Georgia, from Atlanta to Savannah. Unhappy with the killing and maiming of Union and Confederate soldiers in combat blood baths. Sherman decided on purposeful destruction, hoping to insure fewer casualties while helping bring the war to an end as quickly as possible. He repeatedly promised Southerners that he would wage a hard war but would tender a soft peace once the South stopped fighting. The general was true to his word on both counts. In studying a main element of the Lost Cause view of the Civil War, award-winning author John F. Marszalek recounts the march's destructive details, analyzes William T. Sherman's strategy, and describes white and black southern reaction. The result is a gripping tale which demonstrates both how the march affected the Confederacy's last days and how it continues to influence Americans at the beginning of the twenty-first century. John F. Marszalek is Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Mississippi State University. He is the author of twelve books and numerous articles, including Commander of All Lincoln's Armies, A Life of Henry W. Halleck (2004).
Categories: History

The Battle of Griswoldville

The Battle of Griswoldville

This book tells the story of what is sometimes described as the only infantry battle on Sherman's March - the Battle of Griswoldville.

Author: Robert C. Jones

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1461164214

Category: History

Page: 50

View: 126

Love him or hate him, the actions of William Tecumseh Sherman in Georgia in 1864 transformed the Civil War in the space of seven months. From a conflict which was still very much in doubt as to its victor in early 1864, by the time Sherman had captured Atlanta, marched to the Sea, and captured Savannah, the will to fight had largely left the South, and the outcome of the War had become a foregone conclusion. This book tells the story of what is sometimes described as the only infantry battle on Sherman's March - the Battle of Griswoldville. It is the tale of an inexperienced Georgia Militia general ordering an attack across an open, boggy field against an entrenched brigade of Sherman's troops. It is the tale of the bravery of the young boys and old men on that charge, some who had been pressed into emergency service just before the battle. It is the tale of the horror of the Union troops when they examined the dead and wounded, and discovered that many were 15 or younger, and what today we would describe as "senior citizens". It is the tale of a small manufacturing city that was fought over for three days, changing hands several times.
Categories: History

Sherman s March to the Sea

Sherman s March to the Sea

" Sherman's March to the Sea comprehensively covers the campaign, including the fighting and the aftermath of the results. You will learn about Sherman's March to the Sea like you never have before.

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1500533335

Category: History

Page: 42

View: 994

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes accounts of the march written by important participants. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. “I can make this march, and I will make Georgia howl!” – William Tecumseh Sherman “[N]o Civil War commander possessed a more astute appraisal of the nature of the contemporary warfare, how to form and pursue grand strategy, and the critical nexus between war, civil society, popular support, and electoral politics, And few American generals have since.” - Victor Davis Hanson, The Savior Generals William Tecumseh Sherman holds a unique position in American history. Synonymous with barbarity in the South, Sherman is lauded as a war hero in the North, and modern historians consider him the harbinger of total war. As a Union general, Sherman was recognized for his outstanding command of military strategy but criticized for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States, especially in 1864 and 1865. Military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general." Both Grant and Sherman shared the same theory of war: anything that might help the enemy's war effort should be considered a military target. Grant explained to Sherman that the Confederates must be “demoralized and left without hope,” and he instructed Sherman, “Take all provisions, forage and stock wanted for the use of your command. Such as cannot be consumed, destroy. Leave the valley so barren that crows flying over it...will have to carry their provender with them.” This strategy sought the total economic collapse of the South, as well as completely disabling the South's capability of fielding armies. In addition to the wholesale plundering of Southern resources, including taking them from civilians, the Union reversed its policy of swapping prisoners, realizing it had a far bigger reserve of manpower than the South. The Atlanta Campaign was a perfect example of this, as both sides lost about the same number of casualties. By September 1864, however, Sherman still had about 80,000 men, while Hood's army was reduced to about 30,000. Thus, with his remaining forces, about 60,000 strong, Sherman decided to take the unprecedented step of cutting his own communication and supply lines and commencing a widespread march across Georgia, destroying Southern infrastructure and living off the land until his forces reached the coast and linked up with the Union navy. Aside from those plans, Sherman did not appoint a fixed time for his arrival, and the concept of the march greatly concerned the Lincoln Administration, since his men would virtually be on their own without any contact with the rest of the North as they marched straight through the heart of the Confederacy. Grant expressed his own concerns but eventually gave Sherman a simple go-ahead: "Go as you propose." Foragers known as "bummers" (a group comprised of deserters, criminals, and other miscreants) were assigned to seize food from local farms, while the troops (both left and right wings) moved along the railroad lines, ripping up and burning the track as they advanced, leaving miles of severed telegraph lines in their wake. The troops also adopted the habit of heating the train rails over fires and then wrapping them around tree trunks, which became known as "Sherman's neckties." Ultimately, Sherman's armies cut a path of abject destruction 60 miles wide and 300 hundred miles long from Atlanta to Savannah, which some likened to a Biblical blight. And as Sherman had intended, he did indeed made Georgia “howl.” Sherman's March to the Sea comprehensively covers the campaign, including the fighting and the aftermath of the results. You will learn about Sherman's March to the Sea like you never have before.
Categories: History

Atlanta 1864

Atlanta 1864

In this volume author James Donnell explores the entire Atlanta campaign, from Sherman's initial clashes with Joseph E. Johnston's army of Tennessee to the final Confederate resistance under General John Bell Hood.

Author: James Donnell

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472811554

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 306

On September 3, 1864, Union Major-General William Tecumseh Sherman telegraphed the War Department in Washington, D.C., “Atlanta is ours, and fairly won.” The capture of the heart of the south the day before was the end of a fiercely fought four-month campaign in the Western Theater of the Civil War and caused jubilation throughout the North. More importantly for the Union cause, it propelled President Abraham Lincoln to reelection two months later. In this volume author James Donnell explores the entire Atlanta campaign, from Sherman's initial clashes with Joseph E. Johnston's army of Tennessee to the final Confederate resistance under General John Bell Hood. Perfectly complemented by specially commissioned artwork and detailed maps, this study takes the reader from the border of Georgia and Tennessee to Atlanta, with Sherman preparing for his famous March to the Sea.
Categories: History

Sherman s March

Sherman s March

Weaving together hundreds of eyewitness accounts, a noted historian recreates Sherman's devastating sweep through Georgia and the Carolinas in 1864 and 1865 and narrates the experiences of soldiers and civilians "What gives this narrative ...

Author: Burke Davis

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780394757636

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 219

Weaving together hundreds of eyewitness accounts, a noted historian recreates Sherman's devastating sweep through Georgia and the Carolinas in 1864 and 1865 and narrates the experiences of soldiers and civilians
Categories: History

Retracing the Route of Sherman s March to the Sea

Retracing the Route of Sherman s March to the Sea

This book tells the story of Sherman's March to the Sea through the mechanism of looking at what remains today (monuments, buildings, trenches, etc.) at sites associated with those events.

Author: Robert Jones

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1512298700

Category:

Page: 104

View: 896

In November 1864, William Tecumseh Sherman began his March to the Sea. During the six week march, Sherman's army of 62,000 "lived off the land," and cut a swathe of destruction through central Georgia. When Sherman marched into Savannah on December 21, 1864, he had administered a blow to the Confederacy from which it was never able to recover. This book tells the story of Sherman's March to the Sea through the mechanism of looking at what remains today (monuments, buildings, trenches, etc.) at sites associated with those events. Where possible, addresses are included for GPS units. Over 60 photos, maps and newspaper pages are included in this black and white edition.
Categories:

War and Ruin

War and Ruin

This fascinating text is a chronicle of not just the campaign itself, but also a revealing description of how the people of Georgia were affected.

Author: Anne J. Bailey

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0842028501

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 761

>'I can make this march, and make Georgia howl.' -William Tecumseh Sherman The 'March to the Sea' shocked Georgians from Atlanta to Savannah. In the late autumn of 1864, as Sherman's troops cut a four-week long path of terror through Georgia, Sherman accomplished his objective: to destroy civilian morale and with it their support for the Confederate cause. His actions elicited a passionate reaction as tales of his dastardly deeds and destruction burned Sherman's name into the Southern psyche. But does the Savannah Campaign deserve the reputation it has been given? In her new book War and Ruin, Anne J. Bailey examines this event and investigates just how much truth is behind the popular historical notions. Bailey contends that the psychological horror rather than the actual physical damage-which was not as devastating as believed-led to the wilting of Southern morale. War and Ruin looks at the 'March to the Sea' from its inception in Atlanta to its culmination in Savannah. This fascinating text is a chronicle of not just the campaign itself, but also a revealing description of how the people of Georgia were affected. War and Ruin brilliantly combines military history and human interest to achieve a convincing portrayal of what really happened in Sherman's epic effort to smash the Confederate spirit in Georgia.
Categories: History

Sherman Makes Georgia Howl

Sherman Makes Georgia Howl

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes several maps of the battle. *Includes accounts of the fighting written by important generals. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading.

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1984038362

Category:

Page: 174

View: 788

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes several maps of the battle. *Includes accounts of the fighting written by important generals. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. After successfully breaking the Confederate siege at Chattanooga near the end of 1863, William Tecumseh Sherman united several Union armies in the Western theater for the Atlanta Campaign, forming one of the biggest armies in American history. After detaching troops for essential garrisons and minor operations, Sherman assembled his nearly 100,000 men and in May 1864 began his invasion of Georgia from Chattanooga, Tennessee, where his forces spanned a line roughly 500 miles wide. Sherman set his sights on the Confederacy's last major industrial city in the West and General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee, which aimed to protect it. Atlanta's use to the Confederacy lay in its terminus for three major railroad lines that traveled across the South: the Georgia Railroad, Macon and Western, and the Western & Atlantic. U.S. Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant knew this, sending Major General William Tecumseh Sherman's Division of the Mississippi towards Atlanta, with specific instructions, "get into the country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against the war revenues." The city's ability to send supplies to Lee's Army of Northern Virginia made Atlanta all the more important. In August 1864, Sherman moved his forces west across Atlanta and then south of it, positioning his men to cut off Atlanta's supply lines and railroads. When the Confederate attempts to stop the maneuvering failed, the writing was on the wall. On September 1, 1864, Hood and the Army of Tennessee evacuated Atlanta and torched everything of military value. On September 3, 1864, Sherman famously telegrammed Lincoln, "Atlanta is ours and fairly won." Two months later, so was Lincoln's reelection. After the Atlanta campaign, Grant explained to Sherman that the Confederates must be "demoralized and left without hope," and he instructed Sherman, "Take all provisions, forage and stock wanted for the use of your command. Such as cannot be consumed, destroy. Leave the valley so barren that crows flying over it...will have to carry their provender with them." This strategy sought the total economic collapse of the South, as well as completely disabling the South's capability of fielding armies. In addition to the wholesale plundering of Southern resources, including taking them from civilians, the Union reversed its policy of swapping prisoners, realizing it had a far bigger reserve of manpower than the South. The Atlanta Campaign was a perfect example of this, as both sides lost about the same number of casualties. By September 1864, however, Sherman still had about 80,000 men, while Hood's army was reduced to about 30,000. Thus, with his remaining forces, about 60,000 strong, Sherman decided to take the unprecedented step of cutting his own communication and supply lines and commencing a widespread march across Georgia, destroying Southern infrastructure and living off the land until his forces reached the coast and linked up with the Union navy. Aside from those plans, Sherman did not appoint a fixed time for his arrival, and the concept of the march greatly concerned the Lincoln Administration, since his men would virtually be on their own without any contact with the rest of the North as they marched straight through the heart of the Confederacy. Grant expressed his own concerns but eventually gave Sherman a simple go-ahead: "Go as you propose." Ultimately, Sherman's armies cut a path of abject destruction 60 miles wide and 300 hundred miles long from Atlanta to Savannah, which some likened to a Biblical blight. And as Sherman had intended, he did indeed made Georgia "howl."
Categories:

The Siege of Savannah in December 1864 and the Confederate Operations in Georgia and the Third Military District of South Carolina During General Sherman s March from Atlanta to the Sea

The Siege of Savannah in December  1864  and the Confederate Operations in Georgia and the Third Military District of South Carolina During General Sherman s March from Atlanta to the Sea

The Siege of Savannah In December, 1864, & the Confederate Operations in Georgia & the Third Military District of South Carolina During General Sherman's March from Atlanta to the Sea

Author: Charles C. Jones

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 1453831142

Category: History

Page: 142

View: 483

The Siege of Savannah In December, 1864, & the Confederate Operations in Georgia & the Third Military District of South Carolina During General Sherman's March from Atlanta to the Sea
Categories: History

Sherman s March to the Sea 1864

Sherman s March to the Sea 1864

OSPREY PUBLISHING Campaign Sherman's March to the Sea 1864 Atlanta to Savannah David Smith • Illustrated by Richard Hook Campaign • 179 Sherman's March to ...

Author: David Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781846038273

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 752

Riding on the wave of his victory at Atlanta, Union General W. T. Sherman abandoned his supply lines in an attempt to push his forces into Confederate territory and take Savannah. During their 285-mile 'March to the Sea' the army lived off the land and destroyed all war-making capabilities of the enemy en route. Despite the controversy surrounding it, the march was a success. Supported by photographs, detailed maps, and artwork, this title explores the key personalities and engagements of the march and provides a detailed analysis of the campaign that marked the 'beginning of the end' of the Civil War.
Categories: History

Sherman Makes Georgia Howl

Sherman Makes Georgia Howl

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes several maps of the battle. *Includes accounts of the fighting written by important generals. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading.

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1500534773

Category: History

Page: 92

View: 110

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes several maps of the battle. *Includes accounts of the fighting written by important generals. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. After successfully breaking the Confederate siege at Chattanooga near the end of 1863, William Tecumseh Sherman united several Union armies in the Western theater for the Atlanta Campaign, forming one of the biggest armies in American history. After detaching troops for essential garrisons and minor operations, Sherman assembled his nearly 100,000 men and in May 1864 began his invasion of Georgia from Chattanooga, Tennessee, where his forces spanned a line roughly 500 miles wide. Sherman set his sights on the Confederacy's last major industrial city in the West and General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee, which aimed to protect it. Atlanta's use to the Confederacy lay in its terminus for three major railroad lines that traveled across the South: the Georgia Railroad, Macon and Western, and the Western & Atlantic. U.S. Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant knew this, sending Major General William Tecumseh Sherman's Division of the Mississippi towards Atlanta, with specific instructions, “get into the country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against the war revenues.” The city's ability to send supplies to Lee's Army of Northern Virginia made Atlanta all the more important. In August 1864, Sherman moved his forces west across Atlanta and then south of it, positioning his men to cut off Atlanta's supply lines and railroads. When the Confederate attempts to stop the maneuvering failed, the writing was on the wall. On September 1, 1864, Hood and the Army of Tennessee evacuated Atlanta and torched everything of military value. On September 3, 1864, Sherman famously telegrammed Lincoln, “Atlanta is ours and fairly won.” Two months later, so was Lincoln's reelection. After the Atlanta campaign, Grant explained to Sherman that the Confederates must be “demoralized and left without hope,” and he instructed Sherman, “Take all provisions, forage and stock wanted for the use of your command. Such as cannot be consumed, destroy. Leave the valley so barren that crows flying over it...will have to carry their provender with them.” This strategy sought the total economic collapse of the South, as well as completely disabling the South's capability of fielding armies. In addition to the wholesale plundering of Southern resources, including taking them from civilians, the Union reversed its policy of swapping prisoners, realizing it had a far bigger reserve of manpower than the South. The Atlanta Campaign was a perfect example of this, as both sides lost about the same number of casualties. By September 1864, however, Sherman still had about 80,000 men, while Hood's army was reduced to about 30,000. Thus, with his remaining forces, about 60,000 strong, Sherman decided to take the unprecedented step of cutting his own communication and supply lines and commencing a widespread march across Georgia, destroying Southern infrastructure and living off the land until his forces reached the coast and linked up with the Union navy. Aside from those plans, Sherman did not appoint a fixed time for his arrival, and the concept of the march greatly concerned the Lincoln Administration, since his men would virtually be on their own without any contact with the rest of the North as they marched straight through the heart of the Confederacy. Grant expressed his own concerns but eventually gave Sherman a simple go-ahead: "Go as you propose." Ultimately, Sherman's armies cut a path of abject destruction 60 miles wide and 300 hundred miles long from Atlanta to Savannah, which some likened to a Biblical blight. And as Sherman had intended, he did indeed made Georgia “howl.”
Categories: History

Sherman s March to the Sea

Sherman s March to the Sea

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes accounts of the march written by important participants. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading.

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1984038370

Category:

Page: 80

View: 328

*Includes pictures of the battle's important generals. *Includes accounts of the march written by important participants. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. "I can make this march, and I will make Georgia howl!" - William Tecumseh Sherman "[N]o Civil War commander possessed a more astute appraisal of the nature of the contemporary warfare, how to form and pursue grand strategy, and the critical nexus between war, civil society, popular support, and electoral politics, And few American generals have since." - Victor Davis Hanson, The Savior Generals William Tecumseh Sherman holds a unique position in American history. Synonymous with barbarity in the South, Sherman is lauded as a war hero in the North, and modern historians consider him the harbinger of total war. As a Union general, Sherman was recognized for his outstanding command of military strategy but criticized for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States, especially in 1864 and 1865. Military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general." Both Grant and Sherman shared the same theory of war: anything that might help the enemy's war effort should be considered a military target. Grant explained to Sherman that the Confederates must be "demoralized and left without hope," and he instructed Sherman, "Take all provisions, forage and stock wanted for the use of your command. Such as cannot be consumed, destroy. Leave the valley so barren that crows flying over it...will have to carry their provender with them." This strategy sought the total economic collapse of the South, as well as completely disabling the South's capability of fielding armies. In addition to the wholesale plundering of Southern resources, including taking them from civilians, the Union reversed its policy of swapping prisoners, realizing it had a far bigger reserve of manpower than the South. The Atlanta Campaign was a perfect example of this, as both sides lost about the same number of casualties. By September 1864, however, Sherman still had about 80,000 men, while Hood's army was reduced to about 30,000. Thus, with his remaining forces, about 60,000 strong, Sherman decided to take the unprecedented step of cutting his own communication and supply lines and commencing a widespread march across Georgia, destroying Southern infrastructure and living off the land until his forces reached the coast and linked up with the Union navy. Aside from those plans, Sherman did not appoint a fixed time for his arrival, and the concept of the march greatly concerned the Lincoln Administration, since his men would virtually be on their own without any contact with the rest of the North as they marched straight through the heart of the Confederacy. Grant expressed his own concerns but eventually gave Sherman a simple go-ahead: "Go as you propose." Foragers known as "bummers" (a group comprised of deserters, criminals, and other miscreants) were assigned to seize food from local farms, while the troops (both left and right wings) moved along the railroad lines, ripping up and burning the track as they advanced, leaving miles of severed telegraph lines in their wake. The troops also adopted the habit of heating the train rails over fires and then wrapping them around tree trunks, which became known as "Sherman's neckties." Ultimately, Sherman's armies cut a path of abject destruction 60 miles wide and 300 hundred miles long from Atlanta to Savannah, which some likened to a Biblical blight. And as Sherman had intended, he did indeed made Georgia "howl." Sherman's March to the Sea comprehensively covers the campaign, including the fighting and the aftermath of the results. You will learn about Sherman's March to the Sea like you never have before.
Categories:

The Life of Uncle Billy Autobiography of General Sherman

The Life of Uncle Billy  Autobiography of General Sherman

This eBook edition of "The Life of Uncle Billy: Autobiography of General Sherman" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices.

Author: William Tecumseh Sherman

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 9788027241675

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 777

View: 580

This eBook edition of "The Life of Uncle Billy: Autobiography of General Sherman" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. First published ten years after the end of the Civil War, "Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman" were among the first memoirs written by one of the prominent Civil War generals. The memoirs caused a lot of controversy, especially because of the author's unfair treatment of General Grant. General Sherman replied to his critics: "...any witness who may disagree with me should publish his own version of facts in the truthful narration of which he is interested." Contents: From 1820 to the Mexican War, 1846 Early Recollections of California—1846-1848 Missouri, Louisiana, and California—1850-1855 California—1855-1857 California, New York, and Kansas—1857-1859 Louisiana—1859-1861 Missouri—April and May, 1861 From the Battle of Bull Run to Paducah—1861-1862 Battle of Shiloh— March and April, 1862 Shiloh to Memphis- April to July, 1862 Memphis to Arkansas Post— July, 1862, to January, 1863 Vicksburg— January to July, 1863 Chattanooga and Knoxville— July to December, 1863 Meridian Campaign— January and February, 1864 Atlanta Campaign- Nashville and Chattanooga to Kenesaw— March, April, and May, 1864 Atlanta Campaign— Battles About Kenesaw Mountain— June, 1864 Atlanta Campaign— Battles About Atlanta—july, 1864 Capture of Atlanta— August and September, 1864 Atlanta and After— Pursuit of Hood— September and October, 1864 The March to the Sea--from Atlanta to Savannah-- November and December, 1864 Savannah and Pocotaligo-- December, 1864, and January, 1865 Campaign of the Carolinas-- February and March, 1865 End of the War-- From Goldsboro' to Raleigh and Washington-- April and May, 1865 Military Lessons of the War After the War
Categories: Biography & Autobiography