Scottish Witches and Witch Hunters

Scottish Witches and Witch Hunters

This book brings together twelve studies that collectively provide an overview of the main issues of live interest in Scottish witchcraft.

Author: J. Goodare

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137355942

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 582

This book brings together twelve studies that collectively provide an overview of the main issues of live interest in Scottish witchcraft. As well as fresh studies of the well-established topic of witch-hunting, the book also launches an exploration of some of the more esoteric aspects of magical belief and practice.
Categories: History

The Scottish Witch Hunt in Context

The Scottish Witch Hunt in Context

This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-16th century to the early 18th.

Author: Julian Goodare

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719060249

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 828

This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-16th century to the early 18th. It particularly emphasizes the later stages, since scholars are now as keen to explain why witch-hunting declined as why it occurred. There are studies of particular witchcraft panics, including a reassessment of the role of King James VI. The book thus covers a wide range of topics concerned with Scottish witch-hunting - and also places it in the context of other topics: gender relations, folklore, magic and healing, and moral regulation by church and state.
Categories: History

Witch Hunting in Scotland

Witch Hunting in Scotland

Witch-Hunting in Scotland makes fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in witchcraft or in the political, legal and religious history of the early modern period.

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429603907

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 880

Shortlisted for the 2008 Katharine Briggs Award Witch-Hunting in Scotland presents a fresh perspective on the trial and execution of the hundreds of women and men prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft, an offence that involved the alleged practice of maleficent magic and the worship of the devil, for inflicting harm on their neighbours and making pacts with the devil. Brian P. Levack draws on law, politics and religion to explain the intensity of Scottish witch-hunting. Topics discussed include: the distinctive features of the Scottish criminal justice system the use of torture to extract confessions the intersection of witch-hunting with local and national politics the relationship between state-building and witch-hunting and the role of James VI Scottish Calvinism and the determination of zealous Scottish clergy and magistrates to achieve a godly society. This original survey combines broad interpretations of the rise and fall of Scottish witchcraft prosecutions with detailed case studies of specific witch-hunts. Witch-Hunting in Scotland makes fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in witchcraft or in the political, legal and religious history of the early modern period.
Categories: History

Witch Hunt

Witch Hunt

Author: Isabel Adam

Publisher: MacMillan

ISBN: UOM:39015002705682

Category: Procès (Sorcellerie) - Écosse

Page: 256

View: 317

Categories: Procès (Sorcellerie) - Écosse

An Abundance of Witches

An Abundance of Witches

Scotland, as with the rest of Europe, was troubled from time to time by outbreaks of witchcraft which the authorities sought to contain and then to suppress, and the outbreak of 1658-1662 is generally agreed to represent the high water mark ...

Author: P. G. Maxwell-Stuart

Publisher: Tempus Pub Limited

ISBN: STANFORD:36105115115482

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 152

Scotland, as with the rest of Europe, was troubled from time to time by outbreaks of witchcraft which the authorities sought to contain and then to suppress, and the outbreak of 1658-1662 is generally agreed to represent the high water mark of Scottish persecution. These were peculiar years for Scotland. For 9 years Scotland was effectively an English province with largely English officials in charge, but in 1660 this suddenly changed. The tension between imported official English attitudes to witchcraft and the revived fervor of Calvinist religion combined to produce a peculiar atmosphere in which the activities of witches drew hostile attention to an unprecedented degree.
Categories: History

The European Witch Hunt

The European Witch Hunt

A final chapter sets witch-hunting in the context of other episodes of modern persecution. This book is the ideal resource for students exploring the history of witch-hunting.

Author: Julian Goodare

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317198307

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 379

The European Witch-Hunt seeks to explain why thousands of people, mostly lower-class women, were deliberately tortured and killed in the name of religion and morality during three centuries of intermittent witch-hunting throughout Europe and North America. Combining perspectives from history, sociology, psychology and other disciplines, this book provides a comprehensive account of witch-hunting in early modern Europe. Julian Goodare sets out an original interpretation of witch-hunting as an episode of ideologically-driven persecution by the ‘godly state’ in the era of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation. Full weight is also given to the context of village social relationships, and there is a detailed analysis of gender issues. Witch-hunting was a legal operation, and the courts’ rationale for interrogation under torture is explained. Panicking local elites, rather than central governments, were at the forefront of witch-hunting. Further chapters explore folk beliefs about legendary witches, and intellectuals’ beliefs about a secret conspiracy of witches in league with the Devil. Witch-hunting eventually declined when the ideological pressure to combat the Devil’s allies slackened. A final chapter sets witch-hunting in the context of other episodes of modern persecution. This book is the ideal resource for students exploring the history of witch-hunting. Its level of detail and use of social theory also make it important for scholars and researchers.
Categories: History

Demonology and Witch Hunting in Early Modern Europe

Demonology and Witch Hunting in Early Modern Europe

This book brings demonology and witch-hunting back together, while placing both topics in their specific regional cultures.

Author: Julian Goodare

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000080803

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 235

Demonology – the intellectual study of demons and their powers – contributed to the prosecution of thousands of witches. But how exactly did intellectual ideas relate to prosecutions? Recent scholarship has shown that some of the demonologists’ concerns remained at an abstract intellectual level, while some of the judges’ concerns reflected popular culture. This book brings demonology and witch-hunting back together, while placing both topics in their specific regional cultures. The book’s chapters, each written by a leading scholar, cover most regions of Europe, from Scandinavia and Britain through to Germany, France and Switzerland, and Italy and Spain. By focusing on various intellectual levels of demonology, from sophisticated demonological thought to the development of specific demonological ideas and ideas within the witch trial environment, the book offers a thorough examination of the relationship between demonology and witch-hunting. Demonology and Witch-Hunting in Early Modern Europe is essential reading for all students and researchers of the history of demonology, witch-hunting and early modern Europe.
Categories: History

Witches of Fife

Witches of Fife

This book tells the story of what occurred over a period of a century and a half, and offers some explanation as to why it occurred.

Author: Stuart MacDonald

Publisher: Birlinn

ISBN: 9780857907943

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 252

Along the coast of Fife, in villages like Culross and Pittenweem, historical markers and pamphlets now include the fact that some women were executed as witches within these burghs. Still the reality of what happened the night that Janet Cornfoot was lynched in the harbour is hard to grasp as one sits in the harbour of Pittenweem watching the fishing boats unload their catch and the pleasure boats rising with the tide. How could people do this to an old woman? Why was no-one ever brought to justice? And why would anyone defend such a lynching? The task of the historian is to try to make events in the past come alive and seem less strange. This is particularly true in the case of the historian dealing with the witch-hunt. The details are fascinating. Some of the anecdotes are strange. The modern reader finds it hard to imagine illness being blamed on the malevolence of a beggar woman denied charity. It is difficult to understand the economic failure of a sea voyage being attributed to the village hag, not bad weather. Witch-hunting was related to ideas, values, attitudes and political events. It was a complicated process, involving religious and civil authorities, village tensions and the fears of the elite. The witch-hunt in Scotland also took place at a time when one of the main agendas was the creation of a righteous or godly society. As a result, religious authorities had control over aspects of the lives of the people which seem every bit as strange to us today as might any beliefs about magic or witchcraft. That the witch-hunt in Scotland, and specifically in Fife, should have happened at this time was not accidental. This book tells the story of what occurred over a period of a century and a half, and offers some explanation as to why it occurred.
Categories: History

The 1649 50 Scottish Witch hunt

The 1649 50 Scottish Witch hunt

To this date there has been no in depth study of the 1649-50 Scottish witch-hunt.

Author: Paula Hughes

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:966829848

Category:

Page: 406

View: 210

Between April 1649 and July 1650, over 500 people were accused of witchcraft in Scotland. This period represented one of the five "peaks" in witch-hunting in early modern Scotland identified by Christina Larner in her landmark work on the Scottish witch-hunts, Enemies of God (1983). To this date there has been no in depth study of the 1649-50 Scottish witch-hunt. This thesis offers an examination of the 1649-50 witch-hunt, considering the response of the central authorities to the outbreak of witch-hunting in the localities and the efforts to organise and control the witch-hunt. It also considers the actions of the local presbyteries and kirk sessions in the Synod of Lothian and Tweeddale in responding to community pressure for action on suspected witches. A unique approach has been adopted in considering the nature of Covenanting government and how it shaped the central response to the witch-hunt and the attempts to control the witch-hunt "from above". This thesis combines an examination of the volatile political situation in 1649-50 with an analysis of the complex social nature of witchcraft accusations. This thesis brings together the social and political history of the period in the context of explaining the 1649-50 witch-hunt, with particular regard to the synod of Lothian and Tweeddale.
Categories:

Witchcraft in Scotland

Witchcraft in Scotland

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0815310293

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 390

View: 539

Categories: Body, Mind & Spirit

Borders Witch Hunt

Borders Witch Hunt

Mary Craig explores this tremulous period of Scottish history and examines the causes and effects of the 17th century witchcraft trials and executions in the Scottish Borders.

Author: Mary W. Craig

Publisher: Luath Press Ltd

ISBN: 9781910022269

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 220

The years between 1600 and 1700 were a period of war, famine, plague and religious upheaval in Scotland. A time when ordinary women, and men, of the Scottish Borders who fell under the suspicion of the Kirk would face interrogation and torture. A time when fear of Auld Nick turned the world upside down and the cry of witch would almost always lead to the rope and the flame. Mary Craig explores this tremulous period of Scottish history and examines the causes and effects of the 17th century witchcraft trials and executions in the Scottish Borders.
Categories: History

Scottish Witches and Wizards

Scottish Witches and Wizards

"Scottish Witches and Wizards features true accounts of people accused of witchcraft and sorcery from the perilous times of the Scottish witch-hunts.

Author: H. M. Fleming

Publisher:

ISBN: 1899874348

Category: History

Page: 122

View: 377

This accessible and readable book features true accounts primarily from the perilous times of Scottish witch hunts about those who were believed to be witches or wizards. An accusation, however ill formed, often led to trial and being burnt at the stake. Described are the reputed powers of witches and wizards -- including charms, spells, and demonic pacts -- how this magic was used, and what happened to those who were accused: some 3,000 people in all. The book is divided into three sections: introduction, magic, and cases. The first section gives a background to different theories about witches and witchcraft, and explains how a witch was processed through the courts to execution. The second section looks at the practice of witchcraft: what they did and how they did it using spells, charms, and potions. The final section is devoted to different cases, some typical and some more unusual, that occurred from the late sixteenth century up to 1724. Cases included are from Fife, Abderdeenshire, Auldearn, Glasgow, and Edinburgh, as well as the notorious North Berwick trials and infamous Bargarran Case that has been compared to the Salem witch trials. Some of the cases do have a touch of humor to them, as in the Ellen Gray case, about a woman who was accused of having bewitched Thomas Riddell in 1598 so that "his wand lay nevir doune"; he later died from this uncomfortable condition. Scottish Witches and Wizards is an entertaining and instructive book about a mysterious and compelling subject.
Categories: History

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland

This book examines the political, demonological and cultural forces which shaped the North Berwick witchcraft case, and provides edited texts of the accounts of the trials of these witches.

Author: Lawrence Normand

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: UOM:39015053517382

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 961

From 1590 to 1596, Scotland saw its first major witch-hunt. This book examines the political, demonological and cultural forces which shaped the North Berwick witchcraft case, and provides edited texts of the accounts of the trials of these witches.
Categories: History

Witch Hunts in Europe and America

Witch Hunts in Europe and America

Like its predecessors, the Third Edition provides a solid foundation for the study of the practice of safety in degree programs.

Author: William E. Burns

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313321426

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 622

Covering witch hunts from Germany to New England, this concise encyclopedia is a fascinating reference on the hunt to find and persecute those who practiced witchcraft.
Categories: History

Witches and Witch hunters

Witches and Witch hunters

A Reprint of A Treatise of Witchcraft Alexander Roberts, Matthew Hopkins, John
William Brodie-Innes. 33 SCOTTISH WITCHCRAFT TRIALS. the first recorded
case was not until 1563, when, on the 26th of June, Agnes Mullikine, alias Bessie
 ...

Author: Alexander Roberts

Publisher: Sr Books

ISBN: IND:39000005918482

Category: Trials (Witchcraft)

Page: 186

View: 100

Categories: Trials (Witchcraft)

The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe

The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe

A long-standing favourite with students and lecturers alike, this new edition of The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe will be essential reading for those embarking on or looking to advance their studies of the history of witchcraft

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317412410

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 390

The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe, now in its fourth edition, is the perfect resource for both students and scholars of the witch-hunts written by one of the leading names in the field. For those starting out in their studies of witch-beliefs and witchcraft trials, Brian Levack provides a concise survey of this complex and fascinating topic, while for more seasoned scholars the scholarship is brought right up to date. This new edition includes the most recent research on children, gender, male witches and demonic possession as well as broadening the exploration of the geographical distribution of witch prosecutions to include recent work on regions, cities and kingdoms enabling students to identify comparisons between countries. Now fully integrated with Brian Levack’s The Witchcraft Sourcebook, there are links to the sourcebook throughout the text, pointing students towards key primary sources to aid them in their studies. The two books are drawn together on a new companion website with supplementary materials for those wishing to advance their studies, including an extensive guide to further reading, a chronology of the history of witchcraft and an interactive map to show the geographical spread of witch-hunts and witch trials across Europe and North America. A long-standing favourite with students and lecturers alike, this new edition of The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe will be essential reading for those embarking on or looking to advance their studies of the history of witchcraft
Categories: History

Beyond the Witch Trials

Beyond the Witch Trials

This is the first of a two-volume set of books looking at the phenomenon of witchcraft, magic and the occult in Europe since the seventeenth century.

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719066603

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 571

Beyond the witch trials provides an important collection of essays on the nature of witchcraft and magic in European society during the Enlightenment. The book is innovative not only because it pushes forward the study of witchcraft into the eighteenth century, but because it provides the reader with a challenging variety of different approaches and sources of information. The essays, which cover England, Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Germany, Scotland, Finland and Sweden, examine the experience of and attitudes towards witchcraft from both above and below. While they demonstrate the continued widespread fear of witches amongst the masses, they also provide a corrective to the notion that intellectual society lost interest in the question of witchcraft. While witchcraft prosecutions were comparatively rare by the mid-eighteenth century, the intellectual debate did no disappear; it either became more private or refocused on such issues as possession. The contributors come from different academic disciplines, and by borrowing from literary theory, archaeology and folklore they move beyond the usual historical perspectives and sources. They emphasise the importance of studying such themes as the aftermath of witch trials, the continued role of cunning-folk in society, and the nature of the witchcraft discourse in different social contexts. This book will be essential reading for those interested in the decline of the European witch trials and the continued importance of witchcraft and magic during the Enlightenment. More generally it will appeal to those with a lively interest in the cultural history of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This is the first of a two-volume set of books looking at the phenomenon of witchcraft, magic and the occult in Europe since the seventeenth century.
Categories: History

Malevolent Nurture

Malevolent Nurture

In Malevolent Nurture, Deborah Willis explores the dynamics of witchcraft accusation through legal documents, pamphlet literature, religious tracts, and the plays of...

Author: Deborah Willis

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801481945

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 769

In Malevolent Nurture, Deborah Willis explores the dynamics of witchcraft accusation through legal documents, pamphlet literature, religious tracts, and the plays of Shakespeare.
Categories: Literary Criticism