Saving the Soul of Georgia

Donald L. Hollowell and the Struggle for Civil Rights

Author: Maurice C. Daniels

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820345962

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 285

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"This is a biography of Donald Hollowell, one of Georgia's foremost civil rights attorneys. The bulk of the manuscript is focused on Hollowell's career as a lawyer and, in particular, his work on key cases in the 1950s and 1960s, but Daniels also includes a discussion of Hollowell's early years, education, military service, and employment as a regional director of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. In researching the book, Daniels relied on personal interviews as well as the personal papers of civil rights advocates and Southern opposition leaders, court records, newspaper accounts, and other archival sources that offered insight into Hollowell's activism and lawyering. In addition, Daniels conducted three extensive personal interviews with Hollowell that provide firsthand information about his childhood and early background, the influences on his desire to become an advocate for social justice, and his experiences as a civil rights activist and lawyer. Daniels also conducted several interviews with Hollowell's wife, Louise T. Hollowell, to whom he was married for 62 years. The narrative captures Hollowell's civil rights work in Atlanta as well as his work with grassroots leaders in other parts of Georgia. It covers well- known civil rights cases such as the desegregation of University of Georgia while also chronicling the lesser known, yet nonetheless significant, desegregation cases that provided the groundwork for that case. Daniels illuminates Hollowell's behind-the scenes work to help bring about social change in Georgia, his collaboration with proponents of direct action, and the intersection of his work with that of Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund's campaign for equal justice"--
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The Search for Justice

Lawyers in the Civil Rights Revolution, 1950–1975

Author: Peter Charles Hoffer

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022661445X

Category: Law

Page: 224

View: 7123

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The civil rights era was a time of pervasive change in American political and social life. Among the decisive forces driving change were lawyers, who wielded the power of law to resolve competing concepts of order and equality and, in the end, to hold out the promise of a new and better nation. The Search for Justice is a look the role of the lawyers throughout the period, focusing on one of the central issues of the time: school segregation. The most notable participants to address this issue were the public interest lawyers of the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund, whose counselors brought lawsuits and carried out appeals in state and federal courts over the course of twenty years. But also playing a part in the story were members of the bar who defended Jim Crow laws explicitly or implicitly and, in some cases, also served in state or federal government; lawyers who sat on state and federal benches and heard civil rights cases; and, finally, law professors who analyzed the reasoning of the courts in classrooms and public forums removed from the fray. With rich, copiously researched detail, Hoffer takes readers through the interactions of these groups, setting their activities not only in the context of the civil rights movement but also of their full political and legal legacies, including the growth of corporate private legal practice after World War II and the expansion of the role of law professors in public discourse, particularly with the New Deal. Seeing the civil rights era through the lens of law enables us to understand for the first time the many ways in which lawyers affected the course and outcome of the movement.
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Lockheed, Atlanta, and the Struggle for Racial Integration

Author: Randall L. Patton

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820355143

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 2741

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Lockheed has been one of American's largest corporations and most important defense contractors from World War II to the present day (since 1995 as part of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company). During the postwar era, its executives enacted complicated business responses to black demands for equality. Based on the papers of a personnel executive, the memoir of an African American employee, interviews, and company publications, this narrative history offers a unique inside perspective on the evolution of equal employment and affirmative action policies at Lockheed Aircraft's massive Georgia plant from the early 1950s through the early 1980s. Randall L. Patton provides a rare, perhaps unique, account of African American struggle and management response, set within the context of the regional and national struggles for civil rights. The book describes the complex interplay of black protest, federal policy, and management action in a crucial space in the national economy and within the South, contributing to business history, policy history, labor history, and civil rights history.
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Ground Crew

The Fight to End Segregation at Georgia State

Author: Maurice C. Daniels

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820355976

Category: African Americans

Page: 200

View: 8880

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"In the case Hunt v. Arnold, Barbara Hunt, Myra Dinsmore, and Iris Welch won a groundbreaking federal injunction against the all-white Georgia State College in downtown Atlanta. In contrast to the widespread coverage of the University of Georgia case, the plaintiffs in this case, along with local activists involved in the case and the court victory itself, have been overlooked in civil rights history. Daniels sheds light on this forgotten piece of the fight to end segregation in the state of Georgia" --
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Ground Crew

The Fight to End Segregation at Georgia State

Author: Maurice C. Daniels

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 082035595X

Category: African Americans

Page: 200

View: 7041

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"In the case Hunt v. Arnold, Barbara Hunt, Myra Dinsmore, and Iris Welch won a groundbreaking federal injunction against the all-white Georgia State College in downtown Atlanta. In contrast to the widespread coverage of the University of Georgia case, the plaintiffs in this case, along with local activists involved in the case and the court victory itself, have been overlooked in civil rights history. Daniels sheds light on this forgotten piece of the fight to end segregation in the state of Georgia" --
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Southern Cultures: The Help Special Issue

Volume 20: Number 1 – Spring 2014 Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615932

Category: History

Page: 112

View: 1785

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Southern Cultures: The Help Special Issue Volume 20: Number 1 – Spring 2014 Table of Contents Front Porch, by Harry L. Watson "Lauded for her endless gifts and selfless generosity, Mammy is summoned from the kitchen to refute the critics of southern race relations; cruelly circumscribed and taken for granted, she silently confirms them all." The Divided Reception of The Help by Suzanne W. Jones The more one examines the reception of The Help, the less one is able to categorize the reception as divided between blacks and whites or academics and general readers or those who have worked as domestics and those who haven't. Black Women's Memories and The Help by Valerie Smith "Cultural products—literary texts, television series, films, music, theatre, etc.—that look back on the Movement tell us at least as much about how contemporary culture views its own racial politics as they do about the past they purport to represent, often conveying the fantasy that the United States has triumphed over and transcended its racial past." "A Stake in the Story": Kathryn Stockett's The Help, Ellen Douglas's Can't Quit You, Baby, and the Politics of Southern Storytelling by Susan V. Donaldson "Like The Help, Can't Quit You, Baby focuses on the layers of habit, antipathy, resentment, suspicion, attachment, and silence linking white employer and black employee, but in ways that are far more unsettling." "We Ain't Doin' Civil Rights": The Life and Times of a Genre, as Told in The Help by Allison Graham "Perhaps because the modern Civil Rights Movement and television news came of age together, the younger medium was destined to become an iconographic feature of the civil rights genre." Every Child Left Behind: Minny's Many Invisible Children in The Help by Kimberly Wallace-Sanders "The question arises: wouldn't the mammy characters be rendered more believable in their altruism if it extended beyond white children to all children?" Kathryn Stockett's Postmodern First Novel by Pearl McHaney "Pleasure and anger are dependent on one another for heightened authenticity. Discussing The Help with delight and outrage seems just the right action." Not Forgotten: Twenty-Five Years Out from Telling Memories Conversations Between Mary Yelling and Susan Tucker compiled and introduced by Susan Tucker "I am glad she used what the women told us and made something different from it. She made people listen. I know it is fiction, and I know not everyone liked it, but she made people not forget. What more can you want?" Mason-Dixon Lines Prayer for My Children poetry by Kate Daniels About the Contributors Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.
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