Russia and the Idea of the West

Russia and the Idea of the West

Nicholas Turgenev, cited in Robert F. Byrnes, “Attitudes toward the West,” in Ivo J.
Lederer, ed., Russian Foreign Policy (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1962),
pp. 116–17. 12. Konstantin Aksakov, cited in Nicholas Riasanovsky, Russia ...

Author: Robert English

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231504744

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 588

An intriguing "intellectual portrait" of a generation of Soviet reformers, this book is also a fascinating case study of how ideas can change the course of history. In most analyses of the Cold War's end the ideological aspects of Gorbachev's "new thinking" are treated largely as incidental to the broader considerations of power—as gloss on what was essentially a retreat forced by crisis and decline. Robert English makes a major contribution by demonstrating that Gorbachev's foreign policy was in fact the result of an intellectual revolution. English analyzes the rise of a liberal policy-academic elite and its impact on the Cold War's end. English worked in the archives of the USSR Foreign Ministry and also gained access to the restricted collections of leading foreign-policy institutes. He also conducted nearly 400 interviews with Soviet intellectuals and policy makers—from Khrushchev- and Brezhnev-era Politburo members to Perestroika-era notables such as Eduard Shevardnadze and Gorbachev himself. English traces the rise of a "Westernizing" worldview from the post-Stalin years, through a group of liberals in the late1960s–70s, to a circle of close advisers who spurred Gorbachev's most radical reforms.
Categories: Political Science

Russia and Western Civilization Cutural and Historical Encounters

Russia and Western Civilization  Cutural and Historical Encounters

Despite much that had gone wrong in recent Russian history, “a national
conscience which would be able to find a more authentic expression of the true
Russian idea is not yet strangled in us.” Only from within this universalist
perspective was ...

Author: Russell Bova

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317460558

Category: Education

Page: 392

View: 294

This volume introduces readers to an age-old question that has perplexed both Russians and Westerners. Is Russia the eastern flank of Europe? Or is it really the heartland of another civilization? In exploring this question, the authors present a sweeping survey of cultural, religious, political, and economic developments in Russia, especially over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Based on the inter-disciplinary Russian studies program at Dickinson College, this splendid collection will complement many curricula. The text features highlight boxes and selected illustrations. Each chapter ends with a glossary, study questions, and a reading list.
Categories: Education

Russia and the Idea of Europe

Russia and the Idea of Europe

Europe returned as a priority in the Soviet debate about the capitalist West as
well as in foreign policy, with the state declaring 1987 'the year of Europe'. From
1987 to 1989, the state's position on the EC and on the US presence in Western ...

Author: Iver B. Neumann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134824076

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 764

The end of the Soviet system and the transition to the market in Russia, coupled with the inexorable rise of nationalism, has brought to the fore the centuries-old debate about Russia's relationship with Europe. In Russia and the Idea of Europe Iver Neumann discusses whether the tensions between self-referencing romantic nationalist views and Europe-orientated liberal views can ever be resolved. Drawing on a wide range of Russian sources, Neumann outlines the argument as it has unfolded over the last two hundred years, showing how Russia is caught between the attraction of an economically, politically and socially more developed Europe, and the attraction of being able to play a European -style inperial role in less-developed Asia. Neumann argues that the process of delineating a European "other" from the Russian self is an active form of Russian identity formation. The Russian debate about Europe is also a debate about what Rusia is and should be.
Categories: Political Science

Russia Between East and West

Russia Between East and West

Marlène Laruelle THE GENESIS OF EURASIANISM The Orient occupies a
unique space in the history of Russian thought. A number of intellectuals have
taken an interest in this theme since the nineteenth century in order to define the
place ...

Author: Dmitry Shlapentokh

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004154155

Category: Social Science

Page: 198

View: 283

Throughout most of Russian history, two views of who the Russians are have dominated the minds of Russian intellectuals. Westerners assumed that Russia was part of the West, whilst Slavophiles saw Russia as part of a Slavic civilization. At present, it is Eurasianism that has emerged as the paradigm that has made attempts to place Russia in a broad civilizational context and it has recently become the only viable doctrine that is able to provide the very ideological justification for Russia's existence as a multiethnic state. Eurasians assert that Russia is a civilization in its own right, a unique blend of Slavic and non-Slavic, mostly Turkic, people. While it is one of the important ideological trends in present-day Russia, Eurasianism, with its origins among Russian emigrants in the 1920s, has a long history. Placing Eurasianism in a broad context, this book covers the origins of Eurasianism, dwells on Eurasianism's major philosophical paradigms, and places Eurasianism in the context of the development of Polish and Turkish thought. The final part deals with the modern modification of Eurasianism. The book is of great relevance to those who are interested in Russian/European and Asian history area studies.
Categories: Social Science

Stalin s Last Generation

Stalin s Last Generation

and seem to have found resonance among the Soviet population, many other
elements of the post-war anti-Western campaign remained shrouded in
mysterious ... Robert English, Russia and the Idea of the West (New York, 2000),
pp. 44–5.

Author: Juliane Fürst

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191614507

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 285

'Stalin's last generation' was the last generation to come of age under Stalin, yet it was also the first generation to be socialized in the post-war period. Its young members grew up in a world that still carried many of the hallmarks of the Soviet Union's revolutionary period, yet their surroundings already showed the first signs of decay, stagnation, and disintegration. Stalin's last generation still knew how to speak 'Bolshevik', still believed in the power of Soviet heroes and still wished to construct socialism, yet they also liked to dance and dress in Western styles, they knew how to evade boring lectures and lessons in Marxism-Leninism, and they were keen to forge identities that were more individual than those offered by the state. In this book, Juliane Fürst creates a detailed picture of late Stalinist youth and youth culture, looking at young people from a variety of perspectives: as children of the war, as recipients and creators of propaganda, as perpetrators of crime, as representatives of fledgling subcultures, as believers, as critics, and as drop-outs. In the process, she illuminates not only the complex relationship between the Soviet state and its youth, but also provides a new interpretative framework for understanding late Stalinism - the impact of which on Soviet society's subsequent development has hitherto been underestimated, including its role in the ultimate demise of the USSR.
Categories: History

Arctic Politics the Law of the Sea and Russian Identity

Arctic Politics  the Law of the Sea and Russian Identity

Russia and the West – The Foreign Policy Perspective Abstract: Russia's
relations with the West have been at the heart of ... discourse in Russia, this
chapter engages with the Russian idea that the West is trying to encircle Russia
in the Arctic.

Author: G. Hønneland

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137414069

Category: Political Science

Page: 131

View: 146

This book analyses the Russian opposition to the 2010 Barents Sea delimitation agreement in light of both the Law of the Sea and Russian identity, arguing that the agreement's critics and proponents inscribe themselves into different Russian narratives about Russia's rightful place in the world.
Categories: Political Science

Russian Elite Image of Iran

Russian Elite Image of Iran

friendly Orthodox Slavic country, was a big shock, even for pro-Western liberals.
At this point, the idea that the West could, indeed, strike Russia became not just
an assertion of opposition or semi-opposition but one held by at least a ...

Author:

Publisher: Strategic Studies Institute

ISBN: 9781584873983

Category: Elite (Social sciences)

Page: 91

View: 312

The evolution of the Russian elite?s view of Iran is traced over the past 20 years of post-Soviet history. The major thesis and outcome are as follows. 1. During most of the late Soviet and post-Soviet period, two major trends in the approach to Iran have dominated the Russian elite. The first emphasizes the strategic importance of Russia's rapprochement with Iran and is mostly supported by Russian Imperial Nationalists, notably those defined as "Eurasianists." For these groups, an Iran-Russia rapprochement would not be a temporary use of Iran as a bargaining chip in dealing with the West, but a permanent alliance. The second group believes that Russia should use Iran as a bargaining chip in dealing with the United States and as a useful trade partner, but not a permanent ally. Supporters of this view usually see Russia either as a self-contained country or as close to the West, mostly Europe.
Categories: Elite (Social sciences)

Lonely Power

Lonely Power

Russia's leaders, desperately trying to avert the pending economic collapse,
gave no thought to political nuance or the need to adjust to Russia's new
international role. Indeed, they were in unanimous agreement that the West
should ...

Author: Lilia Shevtsova

Publisher: Carnegie Endowment

ISBN: 9780870032981

Category: History

Page: 394

View: 571

In Lonely Power, adapted from the Russian version, Lilia Shevtsova questions the veracity of clichTs about Russiauby both insiders and outsidersuand analyzes Russia's trajectory and how the West influences the country's modernization.
Categories: History

The Extreme Nationalist Threat in Russia

The Extreme Nationalist Threat in Russia

Yet, it should by no means be confused with 'Blairism' in the West as the latter
represents an amalgam of social democratic and liberal ideas. The Western
equivalent of Russian 'Third Way' thinking is profoundly conservative. Its
proponents ...

Author: Thomas Parland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134296774

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 955

This book examines the nature of the extreme right in contemporary Russia, arguing in particular that, alongside a continuing tradition which emphasizes Russia's orthodox and traditional past, an increasingly important intellectual current is drawing on Western European neo-fascist ideas and adapting them to the Russian situation. This book examines this intellectual current within the context of increasing conservatism across Russia as a whole, showing how the new ideas have an impact right across the political spectrum, and assessing the threat posed by them and their proponents.
Categories: History

Soviet Russian Dialectical Materialism Diamat

Soviet Russian Dialectical Materialism  Diamat

This nation which could not comprehend the intellectual world of Western Europe
— whose culture was so different from its own—was deeply shaken by many
ideas from the West. Sooner or later the idea was bound to arise that Russia
alone ...

Author: J.E. Blakeley

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401036290

Category: Philosophy

Page: 193

View: 400

This book offers a critical outline of the sources of the history, of the spirit and of the doctrines of present-day Soviet Russian Dialectical Materialism ('Diamat'), i.e. of the philosophical foundations of Marxism Leninism. It is scarcely necessary to stress the usefulness of a short outline of this kind, as Russian sources are not easily accessible in the West and as it is of considerable interest to know the doctrines which make up the faith of the Communists* in all countries. The material for this book was first made public in a series of lectures at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland), first in French in the summer term of 1949, later in English at the Summer School in the same year. The French text, slightly expanded, was translated into German by Miss M. Hoerkens, Dipl. rer. pol. Various imperfections in the wording of the text and in the bibliography can be explained by the process of formation of this book. The author hopes that such imperfections will not prove disturbing.
Categories: Philosophy

Russia s Foreign Policy

Russia s Foreign Policy

Conservatives rejected the idea that the West had made a considerable
contribution to world development and insisted that Soviet Russia had little to
learn from Western modernity. To them, the moral authority in the world lay
unquestionably ...

Author: Andrei P. Tsygankov

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9780742567542

Category: Political Science

Page: 292

View: 637

A third edition of this book is now available. Now fully updated and revised, this clear and comprehensive text explores the past thirty years of Soviet/Russian international relations, comparing foreign policy formation under Gorbachev, Yeltsin, Putin, and Medvedev. Challenging conventional views of Moscow's foreign policy, Andrei P. Tsygankov shows that definitions of national interest depend on visions of national identity and is rooted both in history and domestic politics. Yet the author also highlights the role of the external environment in affecting the balance of power among competing domestic groups. Drawing on both Russian and Western sources, Tsygankov shows how Moscow's policies have shifted under different leaders' visions of Russia's national interests. He gives an overview of the ideas and pressures that motivated Russian foreign policy in five different periods: the Gorbachev era of the late 1980s, the liberal "Westernizers" era under Kozyrev in the early 1990s, the relatively hardline statist policy under Primakov, the more pragmatic statist course under Putin, and the assertive policy of the late Putin and early Medvedev era. Evaluating the successes and failures of Russia's foreign policies, Tsygankov explains its many turns as Russia's identity and interaction with the West have evolved. The book concludes with reflections on the emergence of the post-Western world and the challenges it presents to Russia's enduring quest for great-power status along with its desire for a special relationship with Western nations.
Categories: Political Science

Natasha s Dance

Natasha s Dance

The constant repetition of these epithets signalled the emergence of an ideology
– a distinctive view of Russia in the mirror of the West. The idea that the West was
morally corrupt was echoed by virtually every Russian writer from Pushkin to ...

Author: Orlando Figes

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 9781466862890

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 841

History on a grand scale--an enchanting masterpiece that explores the making of one of the world's most vibrant civilizations A People's Tragedy, wrote Eric Hobsbawm, did "more to help us understand the Russian Revolution than any other book I know." Now, in Natasha's Dance, internationally renowned historian Orlando Figes does the same for Russian culture, summoning the myriad elements that formed a nation and held it together. Beginning in the eighteenth century with the building of St. Petersburg--a "window on the West"--and culminating with the challenges posed to Russian identity by the Soviet regime, Figes examines how writers, artists, and musicians grappled with the idea of Russia itself--its character, spiritual essence, and destiny. He skillfully interweaves the great works--by Dostoevsky, Stravinsky, and Chagall--with folk embroidery, peasant songs, religious icons, and all the customs of daily life, from food and drink to bathing habits to beliefs about the spirit world. Figes's characters range high and low: the revered Tolstoy, who left his deathbed to search for the Kingdom of God, as well as the serf girl Praskovya, who became Russian opera's first superstar and shocked society by becoming her owner's wife. Like the European-schooled countess Natasha performing an impromptu folk dance in Tolstoy's War and Peace, the spirit of "Russianness" is revealed by Figes as rich and uplifting, complex and contradictory--a powerful force that unified a vast country and proved more lasting than any Russian ruler or state.
Categories: History

Russian Approaches to International Law

Russian Approaches to International Law

Almost 600 years later, Russian and Western representatives meet in the UN SC,
PACE of the CoE, OSCE, and other settings, ... Russian approach to international
law is the powerful idea of Russia's civilizational distinctness from the West.

Author: Lauri Mälksoo

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191034695

Category: Law

Page: 290

View: 459

This book addresses a simple question: how do Russians understand international law? Is it the same understanding as in the West or is it in some ways different and if so, why? It answers these questions by drawing on from three different yet closely interconnected perspectives: history, theory, and recent state practice. The work uses comparative international law as starting point and argues that in order to understand post-Soviet Russia's state and scholarly approaches to international law, one should take into account the history of ideas in Russia. To an extent, Russian understandings of international law differ from what is considered the mainstream in the West. One specific feature of this book is that it goes inside the language of international law as it is spoken and discussed in post-Soviet Russia, especially the scholarly literature in the Russian language, and relates this literature to the history of international law as discipline in Russia. Recent state practice such as the annexation of Crimea in 2014, Russia's record in the UN Security Council, the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, prominent cases in investor-state arbitration, and the creation of the Eurasian Economic Union are laid out and discussed in the context of increasingly popular 'civilizational' ideas, the claim that Russia is a unique civilization and therefore not part of the West. The implications of this claim for the future of international law, its universality, and regionalism are discussed.
Categories: Law

The Russian Idea

The Russian Idea

The crucial importance of the problem of the philosophy of history •East and West
Russia and Europe • Chaadaev • The Slavophils and the Westernizers • The
Two-sidedness of Russian ThoughtRussian Universalism •State and People ...

Author:

Publisher: SteinerBooks

ISBN: 9781584204923

Category:

Page:

View: 530

Categories:

The Agony of the Russian Idea

The Agony of the Russian Idea

Russia. FOR MANY DECADES young minds in the Soviet Union were taught to
think in terms of “historical necessity. ... Although both Marxist and contemporary
Western concepts of historical necessity are rooted in the idea of progress, there
 ...

Author: Tim McDaniel

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400822157

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 182

Boris Yeltsin's attempts at democratic reform have plunged a long troubled Russia even further into turmoil. This dramatic break with the Soviet past has left Russia politically fragmented and riddled with corruption, its people with little hope for the future. In a fascinating account for anyone interested in Russia's current political struggles, Tim McDaniel explores the inability of all its leaders over the last two centuries--tsars and Communist rulers alike--to create the foundations of a viable modern society. The problem then and now, he argues, is rooted in a cultural trap endemic to Russian society and linked to a unique sense of destiny embodied by the "Russian idea." In its most basic sense, the Russian idea is the belief that Russia can forge a path in the modern world that sets itself apart from the West through adherence to shared beliefs, community, and equality. These cultural values, according to McDaniel, have mainly reversed the values of Western society rather than having provided a real alternative to them. By relying on the Russian idea in their programs of change, dictatorial governments almost unavoidably precipitated social breakdown. When the Yeltsin government declared war on the Communist past, it broke with deeply held Russian values and traditions. McDaniel shows that in cutting people off from their pasts and promoting the West as the sole model of modernity, the reformers have simultaneously undermined the foundations of Russian morality and the people's sense of a future. Unwittingly, the Yeltsin government has thereby annihilated its own authority. McDaniel lived in Russia for three years during both the Communist and post-Communist periods. Basing his analysis on broad historical research, extensive travels, countless interviews and conversations, and friendships with Russians from all walks of life, McDaniel emphasizes the perils of assuming that Russians understand the world in the same way that we do, and so can and should become like us. Challenging and provocative in its claims, this book is intended for anyone seeking to understand Russia's attempts to create a new society.
Categories: History

Russian Foreign Policy in the Twenty first Century and the Shadow of the Past

Russian Foreign Policy in the Twenty first Century and the Shadow of the Past

The Kremlin continued to attack both the idea and the model of Western Europe,
but Soviet and East European ... for political and economic reasons, Western
ideas began to flow into Russia despite the Kremlin's best attempts to seal its ...

Author: Robert Legvold

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231141222

Category: Political Science

Page: 534

View: 292

Because the turbulent trajectory of Russia's foreign policy since the collapse of the Soviet Union echoes previous moments of social and political transformation, history offers a special vantage point from which to judge the current course of events. In this book, a mix of leading historians and political scientists examines the foreign policy of contemporary Russia over four centuries of history. The authors explain the impact of empire and its loss, the interweaving of domestic and foreign impulses, long-standing approaches to national security, and the effect of globalization over time. Contributors focus on the underlying patterns that have marked Russian foreign policy and that persist today. These patterns are driven by the country's political makeup, geographical circumstances, economic strivings, unsettled position in the larger international setting, and, above all, its tortured effort to resolve issues of national identity. The argument here is not that the Russia of Putin and his successors must remain trapped by these historical patterns but that history allows for an assessment of how much or how little has changed in Russia's approach to the outside world and creates a foundation for identifying what must change if Russia is to evolve. A truly unique collection, this volume utilizes history to shed crucial light on Russia's complex, occasionally inscrutable relationship with the world. In so doing, it raises the broader issue of the relationship of history to the study of contemporary foreign policy and how these two enterprises might be better joined.
Categories: Political Science

Russian Thought After Communism

Russian Thought After Communism

... WALICKI 4 Russian Philosophers of the Silver Age as Critics of Marxism
Introductory Remarks It is no exaggeration to say that in nineteenth - century
Russian thought the idea of progress was even more central and pronounced
than in West ...

Author: James Patrick Scanlan

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN: 1563243881

Category: Philosophy

Page: 238

View: 639

An examination of Russia's philosophical heritage. It extends from the Slavophiles to the philosophers of the Silver Age, from emigre religious thinkers to Losev and Bakhtin and assesses the meaning for Russian culture as a whole.
Categories: Philosophy

Political Ideologies in Contemporary Russia

Political Ideologies in Contemporary Russia

It is even more significant that Russian public figures and philosophers examine
the idea of multiculturalism with constant reference to similar practices and
debates taking place in the West. Therefore, the extent to which the Russian idea
and ...

Author: Elena Chebankova

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228004387

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 693

In the realm of political discourse there is a distinct gap in understanding between Russia and the West. To an outsider, the ideas that animate the actions of Russia's ruling elite, opposition, and civil society - from the motivations driving Russia's political actors to the class structure and international and domestic constraints that shape Russia's political thinking - remain shrouded in mystery. Contrary to the view that a bleak discursive uniformity reigns in Vladimir Putin's Russia, Political Ideologies in Contemporary Russia shows that the country is engaging in serious theoretical debates across a wide spectrum of modern ideologies including liberalism, nationalism, feminism, and multiculturalism. Elena Chebankova argues that the nation is fragmented and the state seeks to balance the various ideological movements to ensure that none dominates. She shows that each of the main ideological trends is far from uniform, but the major opposition is between liberalism and traditionalism. The pluralistic picture she describes contests many current portrayals of Russia as an authoritarian or even totalitarian state. Offering an alternative to the Western lens through which to view global politics, Political Ideologies in Contemporary Russia is a major contribution to our understanding of this world power.
Categories: Political Science

Russian Architecture and the West

Russian Architecture and the West

It is revealing, however, that it was not the most traditional of the Kremlin's
churches - those built by Russian masters (the ... Western powers made it
impossible to invite foreign masters to Russia who could have introduced
Western ideas.

Author: Dmitriĭ Olegovich Shvidkovskiĭ

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300109122

Category: Architecture

Page: 434

View: 692

This is the first book to show the development of Russian architecture over the past thousand years as a part of the history of Western architecture. Dmitry Shvidkovsky, Russia’s leading architectural historian, departs from the accepted notion that Russian architecture developed independent of outside cultural influences and demonstrates that, to the contrary, the influence of the West extends back to the tenth century and continues into the present. He offers compelling assessments of all the main masterpieces of Russian architecture and frames a radically new architectural history for Russia. The book systematically analyzes Russian buildings in relation to developments in European art, pointing out where familiar European features are expressed in Russian projects. Special attention is directed toward decorations based on Byzantine models; the heritage of Italian master builders and carvers; the impact of architects and others sent by Elizabeth I; the formation of the Russian Imperial Baroque; the Enlightenment in Russian art; and 19th- and 20th-century European influences. With over 300 specially commissioned photographs of sites throughout Russia and western Europe, this magnificent book is both beautiful and groundbreaking.
Categories: Architecture