The Law and Practice of the International Court, 1920-2005 (4 vols)

Author: Shabtai Rosenne

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 904740579X

Category: Law

Page: 2048

View: 3825

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Professor Rosenne's books on the law and practice of the Court have not only grown in size and number of volumes, but also in authority. They can be found on the desks of judges, counsel, scholars and university students alike and for all of them they are the indispensable guide to the Court's jurisprudence.
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International Law

Author: Malcolm N. Shaw

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316061272

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 3929

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This new edition of International Law confirms the text's status as the definitive book on the subject. Combining both his expertise as academic and practitioner, Malcolm Shaw's survey of the subject motivates and challenges both student and professional. By offering an unbeatable combination of clarity of expression and academic rigour, he ensures both understanding and critical analysis in an engaging and authoritative style. The text has been updated throughout to reflect recent case law and treaty developments. It retains the detailed references which encourage and assist further reading and study.
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The International Court of Justice

Author: Hugh Thirlway

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198779070

Category:

Page: 240

View: 7047

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An easily accessible and comprehensive study of the International Court of Justice, this book succinctly explains all aspects of the world's most important court, including an overview of its composition and operation, jurisdiction, procedure, and the nature and impact of its judgments.
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In Whose Name?

A Public Law Theory of International Adjudication

Author: Armin von Bogdandy,Ingo Venzke

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191026956

Category: Law

Page: 400

View: 2363

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The vast majority of all international judicial decisions have been issued since 1990. This increasing activity of international courts over the past two decades is one of the most significant developments within the international law. It has repercussions on all levels of governance and has challenged received understandings of the nature and legitimacy of international courts. It was previously held that international courts are simply instruments of dispute settlement, whose activities are justified by the consent of the states that created them, and in whose name they decide. However, this understanding ignores other important judicial functions, underrates problems of legitimacy, and prevents a full assessment of how international adjudication functions, and the impact that it has demonstrably had. This book proposes a public law theory of international adjudication, which argues that international courts are multifunctional actors who exercise public authority and therefore require democratic legitimacy. It establishes this theory on the basis of three main building blocks: multifunctionality, the notion of an international public authority, and democracy. The book aims to answer the core question of the legitimacy of international adjudication: in whose name do international courts decide? It lays out the specific problem of the legitimacy of international adjudication, and reconstructs the common critiques of international courts. It develops a concept of democracy for international courts that makes it possible to constructively show how their legitimacy is derived. It argues that ultimately international courts make their decisions, even if they do not know it, in the name of the peoples and the citizens of the international community.
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The Evolutionary Interpretation of Treaties

Author: Eirik Bjorge

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191025771

Category: Law

Page: 280

View: 8659

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If an old treaty regulating 'commerce' or forbidding 'degrading treatment of persons' is to be interpreted decades after its conclusion, does 'commerce' or 'degrading treatment of persons' have the same meaning at the time of interpretation as they had when the treaty was concluded? The evolutionary interpretation of treaties has proven one of the most controversial topics in the practice of international law. Indeed, it has been seen as going against the very grain of the law of treaties, and has been argued to be contrary to the intention of the parties, breaching the principle of consent. This book asks what the place of evolutionary interpretation is within the understanding of treaties, at a time when many important international legal instruments are over five decades old. It sets out to place the evolutionary interpretation of treaties on a firm footing within the Vienna rules of interpretation, as codified in Articles 3133 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. The book demonstrates that the evolutionary interpretation of treatiesin common with all other types of interpretationis in fact based upon an objective understanding of the intention of the parties. In order to marry intention and evolution, the book argues that, on the one hand, evolutionary interpretation is the product of the correct application of Articles 3133 and, on the other, that Articles 3133 are geared towards the objective establishment of the intention of the parties. The evolutionary interpretation of treaties is therefore shown to represent an intended evolution.
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Litigating International Law Disputes

Weighing the Options

Author: Natalie Klein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107017068

Category: Law

Page: 534

View: 7697

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This book examines why states resort to international adjudication or arbitration for the resolution of their disputes.
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