The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire

The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire

JOHN HENDERSON The turnaround : a volume retrospect on Roman satires Does a Companion suit Roman Satire ? Is a Companion what Roman Satire needs ? It is easy to see a point in building a team to accompany study of the topic .

Author: Kirk Freudenburg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521803594

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 736

Satire as a distinct genre of writing was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE. Regarded by them as uniquely 'their own', satire held a special place in the Roman imagination as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of a 'real Roman'. In this Cambridge Companion an international team of scholars provides a stimulating introduction to Roman satire's core practitioners and practices, placing them within the contexts of Greco-Roman literary and political history. Besides addressing basic questions of authors, content, and form, the volume looks to the question of what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and goes on to treat the genre's further development, reception, and translation in Elizabethan England and beyond. Included are studies of the prosimetric, 'Menippean' satires that would become the models of Rabelais, Erasmus, More, and (narrative satire's crowning jewel) Swift.
Categories: History

Roman Satire

Roman Satire

There is significance in the fact that Byron himself in his satiric work departed from the couplet into the octet , based on Pulci's Morgante Maggiore , which is familiar to us in The Vision of Judgement ( a lampoon rather than a satire ) ...

Author: J. Wight Duff

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520369962

Category: Humor

Page: 222

View: 773

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1936.
Categories: Humor

Roman Satire

Roman Satire

Recent valuable work on a smaller scale includes A. Cucciarelli, ''Speaking from Silence: The Stoic Paradoxes of Persius,'' in K. Freudenburg, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire (Cambridge, 2005), 62–80; P. Connor, ...

Author: Daniel Hooley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470777084

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 241

This compact and critically up-to-date introduction to Roman satire examines the development of the genre, focusing particularly on the literary and social functionality of satire. It considers why it was important to the Romans and why it still matters. Provides a compact and critically up-to-date introduction to Roman satire. Focuses on the development and function of satire in literary and social contexts. Takes account of recent critical approaches. Keeps the uninitiated reader in mind, presuming no prior knowledge of the subject. Introduces each satirist in his own historical time and place – including the masters of Roman satire, Lucilius, Horace, Persius, and Juvenal. Facilitates comparative and intertextual discussion of different satirists.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Figuring Genre in Roman Satire

Figuring Genre in Roman Satire

Rudd, Themes in Roman Satire, 1; cf. Nichols, who emphasizes satire's blend of attack and moral analysis (“indirect aggression against a target or targets which are made to seem blameworthy within a given context”; Insinuation, 35), ...

Author: Catherine Keane

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190293048

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 528

Satirists are social critics, but they are also products of society. Horace, Persius, and Juvenal, the verse satirists of ancient Rome, exploit this double identity to produce their colorful commentaries on social life and behavior. In a fresh comparative study that combines literary and cultural analysis, Catherine Keane reveals how the satirists create such a vivid and incisive portrayal of the Roman social world. Throughout the tradition, the narrating satirist figure does not observe human behavior from a distance, but adopts a range of charged social roles to gain access to his subject matter. In his mission to entertain and moralize, he poses alternately as a theatrical performer and a spectator, a perpetrator and victim of violence, a jurist and criminal, a teacher and student. In these roles the satirist conducts penetrating analyses of Rome's definitive social practices "from the inside." Satire's reputation as the quintessential Roman genre is thus even more justified than previously recognized. As literary artists and social commentators, the satirists rival the grandest authors of the classical canon. They teach their ancient and modern readers two important lessons. First, satire reveals the inherent fragilities and complications, as well as acknowledging the benefits, of Roman society's most treasured institutions. The satiric perspective deepens our understanding of Roman ideologies and their fault lines. As the poets show, no system of judgment, punishment, entertainment, or social organization is without its flaws and failures. At the same time, readers are encouraged to view the satiric genre itself as a composite of these systems, loaded with cultural meaning and highly imperfect. The satirist who functions as both subject and critic trains his readers to develop a critical perspective on every kind of authority, including his own.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition

Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition

“Horazens Satire 1,7 und die antike Eposparodie.” Poetica 1:8–23. ... Reading Roman Comedy: Poetics and Playfulness in Plautus and Terence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Shero, L. R. 1923. “The Cena in Roman Satire.

Author: Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316240786

Category: History

Page:

View: 408

Quintilian famously claimed that satire was tota nostra, or totally ours, but this innovative volume demonstrates that many of Roman satire's most distinctive characteristics derived from ancient Greek Old Comedy. Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill analyzes the writings of Lucilius, Horace, and Persius, highlighting the features that they crafted on the model of Aristophanes and his fellow poets: the authoritative yet compromised author; the self-referential discussions of poetics that vacillate between defensive and aggressive; the deployment of personal invective in the service of literary polemics; and the abiding interest in criticizing individuals, types, and language itself. The first book-length study in English on the relationship between Roman satire and Old Comedy, Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition will appeal to students and researchers in classics, comparative literature, and English.
Categories: History

English Versions of Roman Satire in the Earlier Eighteenth Century

English Versions of Roman Satire in the Earlier Eighteenth Century

Miller abandoned the third satire after verse 75 and jumped to the fourth, taking it up at verse 78, the familiar ... up things he's never seen, who cannot keep secrets, this is the black-hearted one, this one, you, O Roman, beware.

Author: William Kupersmith

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN: 0874139600

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 271

View: 534

This book discusses Imitations of the ancient Roman verse satirists Horace, Juvenal, and Perseus published in Britain in the first half of the eighteenth century. It endeavors to put major writers such as Alexander Pope and Samuel Johnson in the context of lesser writers of the period. It also devotes attention to other canonical writers such as Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, and Christopher Smart.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Function of Humour in Roman Verse Satire

The Function of Humour in Roman Verse Satire

BIBLIOGRAPHIES Anderson, W. S., 'Recent Work in Roman Satire (1937–1955)', CW 50 (1956–7), 33–40. —— 'Recent Work in Roman Satire (1955–1962)', CW 57 (1963–4), 293–301 & 343–8. —— 'Recent Work in Roman Satire (1962–1968)', ...

Author: Maria Plaza

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199281114

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 370

View: 714

Roman satire has always attracted a large audience through its aesthetic merit. As for content, it has traditionally been held that the aim of Horace, Persius, and Juvenal is to offer moral criticism. Maria Plaza argues that behind the moralizing facade the reader may find more sinister motives, such as fear, envy, and sexual sensationalism. In this study she uses an analysis of humour to investigate the complex essence of Roman satire.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Function of Humour in Roman Verse Satire

The Function of Humour in Roman Verse Satire

BIBLIOGRAPHIES Anderson, W. S., 'Recent Work in Roman Satire (1937–1955)', CW 50 (1956–7), 33–40. —— 'Recent Work in Roman Satire (1955–1962)', CW 57 (1963–4), 293–301 & 343–8. —— 'Recent Work in Roman Satire (1962–1968)', ...

Author: Maria Plaza

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191535840

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 564

Maria Plaza sets out to analyse the function of humour in the Roman satirists Horace, Persius, and Juvenal. Her starting point is that satire is driven by two motives, which are to a certain extent opposed: to display humour, and to promote a serious moral message. She argues that, while the Roman satirist needs humour for his work's aesthetic merit, his proposed message suffers from the ambivalence that humour brings with it. Her analysis shows that this paradox is not only socio-ideological but also aesthetic, forming the ground for the curious, hybrid nature of Roman satire.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Themes in Roman Satire

Themes in Roman Satire

Author: Niall Rudd

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: UOM:39015012085216

Category: Latin literature

Page: 242

View: 169

Categories: Latin literature

Figuring Genre in Roman Satire

Figuring Genre in Roman Satire

In these roles the satirist conducts penetrating analyses of Rome's definitive social practices "from the inside." Satire's reputation as the quintessential Roman genre is thus even more justified than previously recognized."--BOOK JACKET.

Author: Catherine Keane

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195183306

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 182

View: 189

In these roles the satirist conducts penetrating analyses of Rome's definitive social practices "from the inside." Satire's reputation as the quintessential Roman genre is thus even more justified than previously recognized."--BOOK JACKET.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire

The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire

Besides addressing basic questions of authors, content, and form, the volume looks to the question of what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and goes on to treat the genre's further development, reception, and ...

Author: Kirk Freudenburg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139826570

Category: History

Page:

View: 920

Satire as a distinct genre of writing was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE. Regarded by them as uniquely 'their own', satire held a special place in the Roman imagination as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of a 'real Roman'. In this Cambridge Companion an international team of scholars provides a stimulating introduction to Roman satire's core practitioners and practices, placing them within the contexts of Greco-Roman literary and political history. Besides addressing basic questions of authors, content, and form, the volume looks to the question of what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and goes on to treat the genre's further development, reception, and translation in Elizabethan England and beyond. Included are studies of the prosimetric, 'Menippean' satires that would become the models of Rabelais, Erasmus, More, and (narrative satire's crowning jewel) Swift.
Categories: History

Latin Verse Satire

Latin Verse Satire

Greek satyr plays, which he was able to separate completely from Roman satire. An inability to separate these two distinct genres had caused confusion in the previous century. Casaubons's second book is a thoroughly documented study of ...

Author: Paul Allen Miller

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134371952

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 874

A wide variety of texts by the Latin satirists are presented here in a fully loaded resource to provide an innovative reading of satire's relation to Roman ideology. Brimming with notes, commentaries, essays and texts in translation, this book succeeds in its mission to help the student understand the history of Latin's modern scholarly reception. Focusing on the linguistic difficulties and problems of usage, and examining aspects of meter and style necessary for poetry appreciation, the commentary places each selection in its own historical context then using essays and critical excerpt, the genre's most salient features are elucidated to provide a further understanding of its place in history. Extremely student friendly, this stands well both as a companion to Latin Erotic Elegy and in its own right as an invaluable fund of knowledge for any Latin literature scholar.
Categories: History

Essays on Roman Satire

Essays on Roman Satire

This work develops his thesis that Roman satire was designed as a literary form and that the proper stance of the critic is to elucidate its art.

Author: William S. Anderson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400853151

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 514

View: 876

Irvine Anderson carefully reconstructs the years between 1933 and 1950 and provides a case study of the evolution of U.S. foreign oil policy and of the complex relationships between the U.S. government and the business world. Originally published in 1982. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Roman Satire

Roman Satire

This study appraises the work of all the Roman satirists, from the 2nd century BC, to the end of the reign of Hadrian in AD 138.

Author: Michael Coffey

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN: UOM:39015021819928

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 306

View: 330

This study appraises the work of all the Roman satirists, from the 2nd century BC, to the end of the reign of Hadrian in AD 138. The satirists' work is shown to reflect the constantly changing society in which they lived, and its topics range from the morally earnest to the bawdy. Certain themes are examined which are common to some degree to all the satirists - autobiographical revelation, personal invective, political and ethical judgements and literary criticism. The book provides an exposition of the tradition of verse satire from Lucilius through Horace and Persius to Juvenal, with an assessment of the structure and distinctive literary quality of each satire. It discusses satire in the Menippean tradition, a composite form of prose and verse which was used first by Varro, then by Petronius and by Seneca in his "Apocolocyntosis", a comical and malicious satire on the deification of the emperor Claudius.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Persius and the Programmatic Satire

Persius and the Programmatic Satire

Following Callimachus , Roman satirists , iambists and epigrammatists profess innocence , inhibited more by the ethical and rhetorical dictation of charity and humanity in matters appertaining to the comic , than by legal considerations ...

Author: J. C. Bramble

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521038049

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 665

A critical study of Persius' poetic aims, aversions and techniques, based mainly on an extended analysis of Satires I. John Bramble shows how Persius' discontent with conventional literary language led him to compress the existing satiric idiom and create a powerful individual style. The author situates Persius' work in the tradition of Roman satire, and shows how he takes the concepts and metaphors of literary criticism back to their physical origins, to indict moral and literary decadence through a series of images connected with, for example, gluttony and sexual excess. This is a model study of a classical text, which makes consistent sense of a difficult and subtle manner, and answers questions posed by the potentially constricting nature of Roman poetic form. It also reconstructs the referential framework of ideas and associations upon which a sophisticated writer addressing a discriminating audience could draw.
Categories: History

Laughing Atoms Laughing Matter

Laughing Atoms  Laughing Matter

CHAPTER 6 o Civic Satire in Roman Satura and Lucretius One of the enduring characteristics of the Roman genre of satire is its involvement with Roman social and political life. The satirist is not only a poet of comic blame but also a ...

Author: T.H.M. Gellar-Goad

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472131808

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 671

"The aim of this study is to track De Rerum Natura along two paths of satire. One is the broad boulevard of satiric literature from the beginnings of Greek poetry to the plays, essays, and broadcast media of the modern world. The other is the narrower lane of Roman verse satire, satura, whose canon begins in the Middle Republic with Ennius and Lucilius and closes with Juvenal, an author of the Flavian era. The first main portion of this book (chapters 2-3) focuses on Lucretius and Roman satura, while the following chapters broaden the scope to satiric elements of Lucretius more generally, but still with plenty of reference to the poets of Roman satura as satirists par excellence. By examining how Lucretius' poem employs the tools, techniques, and tactics of satire-by evaluating how and where in De Rerum Natura the speaker functions as a satirist-we gain, I argue, a fuller, richer understanding of how the poem works and how its poetry interacts with its purported philosophical program. Attention to the role of De Rerum Natura in the more specific tradition of Roman verse satire demonstrates that Lucretius' poem stands as a detour on the genre's highway, a swerve in the trajectory of satura. The numerous satiric passages and frequently satiric narrator of De Rerum Natura draw on earlier Roman satire, and in turn the poem influences the later satiric verse of Horace, Persius, and Juvenal. While De Rerum Natura is not in and of itself a member of the Roman genre of satire, it is an important player in the genre's development"--
Categories: History

A Roman Verse Satire Reader

A Roman Verse Satire Reader

The trademark exuberance of Lucilius, gentleness of Horace, abrasiveness of Persius, and vehemence of Juvenal are the diverse satiric styles on display in this Reader.

Author: Catherine Keane

Publisher: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers

ISBN: 1610410246

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 142

View: 332

The trademark exuberance of Lucilius, gentleness of Horace, abrasiveness of Persius, and vehemence of Juvenal are the diverse satiric styles on display in this Reader. Witnesses to the spectacular growth of Rome's political and military power, the expansion and diversification of its society, and the evolution of a wide spectrum of its literary genres, satirists provide an unparalleled window into Roman culture: from trials of the urban poor to the smarmy practices of legacy hunters, from musings on satire and the satirist to gruesome scenes from a gladiatorial contest, from a definition of virtue to the scandalous sexual display of wayward women. Provocative and entertaining, challenging and yet accessible, Roman verse satire is a motley dish stuffed to its readers' delights.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Roman Eloquence

Roman Eloquence

In this essay I shall show how Roman rhetorical theory and practice pervade Roman satire from Lucilius onwards and I shall argue that the familiarity of the Roman audience with the rhetorical frameworks and conventions exploited by the ...

Author: William J. Dominik

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415125448

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

View: 781

Rhetoric is once again becoming valued as an essential element in the exploration of the ancient world. This volume is part of a general renaissance in the study of rhetoric and draws together established and newer scholars in the field to produce a probing and innovative analysis of the role played by rhetoric in Roman culture. Utilizing a variety of critical approaches and methodologies, the contributors examine not only the role of rhetoric in Roman society but also the relationship between rhetoric and Rome's major literary genres.RomanEloquenceemphasizes the theory and practice of rhetoric in a variety of social, political and literary contexts, and reveals the important role played by rhetoric in the formation of the various genres of literatures.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century Satire

The Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century Satire

Victoria Rimell, “The Poor Man's Feast, in The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire, ed. Kirk Freudenberg (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 84. * John Henderson, 'The Turnaround: A Volume Retrospect on Roman Satires, ...

Author: Paddy Bullard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191043703

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 816

View: 582

Eighteenth century Britain thought of itself as a polite, sentimental, enlightened place, but often its literature belied this self-image. This was an age of satire, and the century's novels, poems, plays, and prints resound with mockery and laughter, with cruelty and wit. The street-level invective of Grub Street pamphleteers is full of satire, and the same accents of raillery echo through the high scepticism of the period's philosophers and poets, many of whom were part-time pamphleteers themselves. The novel, a genre that emerged during the eighteenth century, was from the beginning shot through with satirical colours borrowed from popular romances and scandal sheets. This Handbook is a guide to the different kinds of satire written in English during the 'long' eighteenth century. It focuses on texts that appeared between the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660 and the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789. Outlier chapters extend the story back to first decade of the seventeenth century, and forward to the second decade of the nineteenth. The scope of the volume is not confined by genre, however. So prevalent was the satirical mode in writing of the age that this book serves as a broad and characteristic survey of its literature. The Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth-Century Satire reflects developments in historical criticism of eighteenth-century writing over the last two decades, and provides a forum in which the widening diversity of literary, intellectual, and socio-historical approaches to the period's texts can come together.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Roman Satire

Roman Satire

This general study of Roman satire both describes the historical development of Roman verse satire as a homogenous genre and examines the great Roman satiric poets as individuals.

Author: Ulrich Knoche

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106001541264

Category: Rome

Page: 243

View: 302

This general study of Roman satire both describes the historical development of Roman verse satire as a homogenous genre and examines the great Roman satiric poets as individuals.
Categories: Rome