Roman Pottery in the Archaeological Record

Roman Pottery in the Archaeological Record

This book examines how Romans used their pottery and the implications of these practices on the archaeological record.

Author: J. Theodore Peña

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139464277

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 322

This book examines how Romans used their pottery and the implications of these practices on the archaeological record. It is organized around a flow model for the life cycle of Roman pottery that includes a set of eight distinct practices: manufacture, distribution, prime use, reuse, maintenance, recycling, discard, reclamation. J. Theodore Peña evaluates how these practices operated, how they have shaped the archaeological record, and the implications of these processes on archaeological research through the examination of a wide array of archaeological, textual, representational and comparative ethnographic evidence. The result is a rich portrayal of the dynamic that shaped the archaeological record of the ancient Romans that will be of interest to archaeologists, ceramicists, and students of material culture.
Categories: Social Science

Pottery in the Archaeological Record

Pottery in the Archaeological Record

In Classical Archaeology, attention to these processes received an impetus by J. Theodore Pena's 2007 monograph, Roman Pottery in the Archaeological Record, which considered how ceramic vessels were made, used and stayed in use serving ...

Author: Mark L. Lawall

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9788771240887

Category: Art

Page: 168

View: 727

Archaeologist are increasingly focusing on the transformation of artifacts from their use in the past to their appearance in the archaeological record, trying to identiy the natural and cultural processes that created the archaeological record we study today. In Classical Archaeology, attention to these processes received an impetus by J. Theodore Pena's 2007 monograph, Roman Pottery in the Archaeological Record, which considered how ceramic vessels were made, used and stayed in use serving various secondary purposes, before finally being discarded. Pena relied mainly on evidence from Roman Italy, which raises the question of the impact of similar cultural forces on pottery from other periods and places. His work accentuates the need to continue the process of building and developing explicit interpretive models of ceramic life-histories in Mediterranean archeology. With a view to beginning to address these challenges, the editors invited a group of specialists in the pottery of Greece and the rest of the Eastern Mediterranean to a colloquium in Athens in June 2008, asking the contributors to recondiser Pena's general models, approaches and examples from their own particular geographic and cultural perspectives. This publication constitutes the proceedings of this colloquium.
Categories: Art

Roman Pottery

Roman Pottery

Author: Kevin Greene

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015029710335

Category: Pottery - Archaeology

Page: 64

View: 140

Categories: Pottery - Archaeology

Pottery in Archaeology

Pottery in Archaeology

This revised edition provides an up-to-date account of the many different kinds of information that can be obtained through the archaeological study of pottery.

Author: Clive Orton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107433939

Category: Social Science

Page: 356

View: 493

This revised edition provides an up-to-date account of the many different kinds of information that can be obtained through the archaeological study of pottery. It describes the scientific and quantitative techniques that are now available to the archaeologist, and assesses their value for answering a range of archaeological questions. It provides a manual for the basic handling and archiving of excavated pottery so that it can be used as a basis for further studies. The whole is set in the historical context of the ways in which archaeologists have sought to gain evidence from pottery and continue to do so. There are case studies of several approaches and techniques, backed up by an extensive bibliography.
Categories: Social Science

Understanding the Archaeological Record

Understanding the Archaeological Record

Extending the concept of the archaeological record to include eco— facts does,
however, raise the issue of the ... the past fell within the domain of archaeology,
including folklore and manuscripts as well as church buildings and Roman
pottery.

Author: Gavin Lucas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107010260

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 411

Machine generated contents note: 1. The trouble with theory; 2. The total record; 3. Formation theory; 4. Materialized culture; 5. Archaeological entities; 6. Archaeological interventions; 7. A 'new' social archaeology?
Categories: Social Science

TRAC 2013

TRAC 2013

Proceedings of the Twenty-Third Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology
Conference, London 2013 Hannah Platts, Caroline Barron, ... Ted Peña (2007)
refines Schiffer's model in his study of Roman pottery in the archaeological
record.

Author: Hannah Platts

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781782976905

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 455

The twenty-third Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (TRAC) was held at King’s College, London in Spring 2013. During the three-day conference nearly papers were delivered, discussing issues from a wide range of geographical regions of the Roman Empire, and applying various theoretical and methodological approaches. Sessions included those looking at Roman–Barbarian interactions; identity and funerary monuments in ancient Italy; migration and social identity in the Roman Near East; theoretical approaches to Roman small finds; formation processes of in-fills in urban sites; and new reflections on Roman glass. This volume contains a selection of papers from the conference sessions.
Categories: History

The Measure of Civilization

The Measure of Civilization

“some archaeological Correlates of ranked societies.” american antiquity 42:421
–48. Peña, theodore. 2007. Roman Pottery in the archaeological Record.
Cambridge, uK: Cambridge university Press. Perdue, Peter. 2005. China
Marches West: ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400844760

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 138

A groundbreaking look at Western and Eastern social development from the end of the ice age to today In the past thirty years, there have been fierce debates over how civilizations develop and why the West became so powerful. The Measure of Civilization presents a brand-new way of investigating these questions and provides new tools for assessing the long-term growth of societies. Using a groundbreaking numerical index of social development that compares societies in different times and places, award-winning author Ian Morris sets forth a sweeping examination of Eastern and Western development across 15,000 years since the end of the last ice age. He offers surprising conclusions about when and why the West came to dominate the world and fresh perspectives for thinking about the twenty-first century. Adapting the United Nations' approach for measuring human development, Morris's index breaks social development into four traits—energy capture per capita, organization, information technology, and war-making capacity—and he uses archaeological, historical, and current government data to quantify patterns. Morris reveals that for 90 percent of the time since the last ice age, the world's most advanced region has been at the western end of Eurasia, but contrary to what many historians once believed, there were roughly 1,200 years—from about 550 to 1750 CE—when an East Asian region was more advanced. Only in the late eighteenth century CE, when northwest Europeans tapped into the energy trapped in fossil fuels, did the West leap ahead. Resolving some of the biggest debates in global history, The Measure of Civilization puts forth innovative tools for determining past, present, and future economic and social trends.
Categories: Social Science

The Fall of Rome

The Fall of Rome

which combined archaeological evidence with modern ethnographic data,
divided Roman pottery production into a number of different categories: at its
simplest, 'household production', characterized by a rough appearance and very
basic ...

Author: Bryan Ward-Perkins

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191622366

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 860

Why did Rome fall? Vicious barbarian invasions during the fifth century resulted in the cataclysmic end of the world's most powerful civilization, and a 'dark age' for its conquered peoples. Or did it? The dominant view of this period today is that the 'fall of Rome' was a largely peaceful transition to Germanic rule, and the start of a positive cultural transformation. Bryan Ward-Perkins encourages every reader to think again by reclaiming the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world, and reminding us of the very real horrors of barbarian occupation. Attacking new sources with relish and making use of a range of contemporary archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans, in a world of economic collapse, marauding barbarians, and the rise of a new religious orthodoxy. He also looks at how and why successive generations have understood this period differently, and why the story is still so significant today.
Categories: History

Roman Archaeology for Historians

Roman Archaeology for Historians

This work is a key resource for students of ancient history, and for those studying the archaeology of the Roman period.

Author: Ray Laurence

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415505925

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 547

Roman Archaeology for Historians provides students of Roman history with a guide to the contribution of archaeology to the study of their subject. It discusses the issues with the use of material and textual evidence to explain the Roman past, and the importance of viewing this evidence in context. It also surveys the different approaches to the archaeological material of the period and examines key themes that have shaped Roman archaeology. At the heart of the book lies the question of how archaeological material can be interpreted and its relevance for the study of ancient history. It includes discussion of the study of landscape change, urban topography, the economy, the nature of cities, new approaches to skeletal evidence and artefacts in museums. Along the way, readers gain access to new findings and key sites - many of which have not been discussed in English before and many, for which, access may only be gained from technical reports. Roman Archaeology for Historians provides an accessible guide to the development of archaeology as a discipline and how the use of archaeological evidence of the Roman world can enrich the study of ancient history, while at the same time encouraging the integration of material evidence into the study of the period's history. This work is a key resource for students of ancient history, and for those studying the archaeology of the Roman period.
Categories: History

Classical Greece

Classical Greece

Ancient Histories and Modern Archaeologies John Disney Professor of
Archaeology Cyprian Broodbank Ian Morris, ... In particular he suggests that we
should be ' wary ' of ' economic conclusions ' which are based ' on the DAVID
W. J. GILL evidence of painted pottery alone ' ( p . ... Tartessos ) so great a profit
on their wares as no Greeks The same cannot be said for Roman pottery where
there ever did ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521456789

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 173

A reassessment of the archaeology of classical Greece, using modern archaeological approaches to provide a richer understanding of Greek society.
Categories: History

An Archaeological Record of Rome from the Seventh to the Second Century B C

An Archaeological Record of Rome from the Seventh to the Second Century B C

Since , further , the technique of making black glazed vases with painted
inscriptions is known to have been practiced in Rome , 138 there remains no
good argument against the hypothesis that the pocula were made in a Roman
pottery and ...

Author: Inez Scott Ryberg

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X001100073

Category: Archaeology

Page: 247

View: 429

Categories: Archaeology

The Secret History of the Roman Roads of Britain

The Secret History of the Roman Roads of Britain

... Earth for archaeologists', The SAA Archaeological Record 10:4, 7–11 Nash-
Williams, V.E. (1969), The Roman Frontier ... Current Archaeology 151, 272–3
Northern Archaeological Associates (2005), Iron Age Settlement and Roman
Pottery ...

Author: M.C. Bishop

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473837478

Category: History

Page: 210

View: 399

There have been many books on Britain's Roman roads, but none have considered in any depth their long-term strategic impact. Mike Bishop shows how the road network was vital not only in the Roman strategy of conquest and occupation, but influenced the course of British military history during subsequent ages. The author starts with the pre-Roman origins of the network (many Roman roads being built over prehistoric routes) before describing how the Roman army built, developed, maintained and used it. Then, uniquely, he moves on to the post-Roman history of the roads. He shows how they were crucial to medieval military history (try to find a medieval battle that is not near one) and the governance of the realm, fixing the itinerary of the royal progresses. Their legacy is still clear in the building of 18th century military roads and even in the development of the modern road network. Why have some parts of the network remained in use throughout?The text is supported with clear maps and photographs. Most books on Roman roads are concerned with cataloguing or tracing them, or just dealing with aspects like surveying. This one makes them part of military landscape archaeology.
Categories: History

An Archaeology of Identity

An Archaeology of Identity

In this section , I will consider some general issues pertaining to the technologies
— primarily pottery , in the archaeological record for Roman Britain - before
looking at the meat part of the actual diet . In both cases I will also describe the ...

Author: Andrew Gardner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: STANFORD:36105124102729

Category: Social Science

Page: 311

View: 338

What happened to Roman soldiers in Britain during the decline of the empire in the 4th and 5th centuries? Did they withdraw, defect, or go native? More than a question of military history, this is the starting point for Andrew Gardner's incisive exploration of social identity in Roman Britain, in the Roman Empire, and in ancient society. Drawing on the sociological theories of Anthony Giddens and others, Gardner shapes an approach that focuses on the central role of practice in the creation and maintenance of identities--nationalist, gendered, class, and ethnic. This theory is then tested against the material remains of Roman soldiers in Britain to show how patterning of stratigraphy, architecture, and artifacts supports his theoretical construct. The result is a retelling of the story of late Roman Britain sharply at odds with the traditional text-driven histories and a theory of human action that offers much to current debates across the social sciences.
Categories: Social Science

The Cambridge World History of Slavery Volume 1 The Ancient Mediterranean World

The Cambridge World History of Slavery  Volume 1  The Ancient Mediterranean World

CHAPTER 9 ARCHAEOLOGY AND GREEK SLAVERY ian morris introduction
What can archaeologists contribute to the ... labour and capital in Roman pottery
kilns, insisting that 'archaeological evidence or archaeological analysis by itself ...

Author: Keith Bradley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521840668

Category: History

Page: 632

View: 780

"Most societies in the past have had slaves, and almost all peoples have at some time in their pasts been both slaves as well as owners of slaves. Recent decades have seen a significant increase in our understanding of the historical role played by slavery and wide interest across a range of academic disciplines in the evolution of the institution. Exciting and innovative research methodologies have been developed, and numerous fruitful debates generated. Further, the study of slavery has come to providestrong connections between academic research and the wider public interest at a time when such links have in general been weak. The CambridgeWorld History of Slavery responds to these trends by providing for the first time, in four volumes, a comprehensive global history of this widespread phenomenon from the ancient world to the present day. Volume I surveys the history of slavery in the ancient Mediterranean world. Although chapters are devoted to the ancient Near East and the Jews, its principal concern is with the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. These are often considered as the first examples in world history of genuine slave societies because of the widespread prevalence of chattel slavery, which is argued to have been a cultural manifestation of the ubiquitous violence in societies typified by incessant warfare"--Provided by publisher.
Categories: History

Hispania and the Roman Mediterranean AD 100 700

Hispania and the Roman Mediterranean  AD 100 700

Peña , J.T. ( 1999 ) , The Urban Economy During the Early Dominate : pottery
evidence from the Palatine Hill ( British Archaeological Reports , International
Series 784 ) , Oxford . Peña , J.T. ( 2007 ) , Roman Pottery in the Archaeological ...

Author: Paul Reynolds

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN: UCSD:31822036452985

Category: Art

Page: 372

View: 492

Gathers together and reviews the evidence for trends in production of table wares and amphora-borne goods across the Iberian Peninsula and Balearics from the second to the seventh century AD.
Categories: Art

The Greco Roman East

The Greco Roman East

The three case studies deal with pottery , an important form of archaeological
evidence for trade throughout the Roman empire ; with coins , artefacts of
obvious relevance to economic questions ; and with bathing technology . Dura -
Europos ...

Author: Stephen Colvin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521828759

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 924

Publisher Description
Categories: History

Early Rome Synthesis of archaeological evidence 2 pts

Early Rome  Synthesis of archaeological evidence  2 pts

256 , the stylistic similarities between the Cumaean and Roman Impasto pottery
of the early Iron Age are so great that some shapes are even identical , proving
them to be synchronous . In particular the specimens of Expansive Impasto in ...

Author: Einar Gjerstad

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015037027730

Category: Excavations (Archaeology)

Page:

View: 140

Categories: Excavations (Archaeology)

Pottery in Roman Britain

Pottery in Roman Britain

Roman pottery and the archaeologist But high - value possessions are normally
cared for , so identical samian might survive ... Roman pottery was mainly
available only to tribal aristocrats , making little impact on the archaeological
record ...

Author: Guy de la Bedoyere

Publisher: Shire Publications

ISBN: UOM:39015053374743

Category: Social Science

Page: 72

View: 761

This book looks at how pottery was made and circulated and how pottery can be useful to archaeologists. It goes on to look at the different types of wares that existed in the four centuries of Roman Britain. These include vessels imported from the most exotic regions of the Roman Empire, products of the samian industries of Gaul and those of local kitchenware industries in Britain. Products were as diverse as bowls, amphorae and lamps, while fired clay was also used to make tiles, figurines and even moulds for metalworking. The wide range of illustrations makes the book invaluable both to students and to archaeologists digging on-site, as well as to those interested in finding out more about a remarkable period of life in the history of Britain.
Categories: Social Science

The Fall of the Roman Empire

The Fall of the Roman Empire

Only one other waterborne summit is recorded in fourthcentury sources, this time
on the Rhine – again, a Roman emperor (Valentinian) needed to secure one
frontier to tackle a problem on another. ... That these privileges were real and
enjoyed by the Goths is visible in the archaeological record. Fourthcentury Gothic
sites are littered with the pottery sherds of Roman amphorae, most of them
broken wine ...

Author: Peter Heather

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199741182

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 681

The death of the Roman Empire is one of the perennial mysteries of world history. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors Rome called barbarians into an enemy capable of dismantling an Empire that had dominated their lives for so long. A leading authority on the late Roman Empire and on the barbarians, Heather relates the extraordinary story of how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome on every possible level, eventually pulled the empire apart. He shows first how the Huns overturned the existing strategic balance of power on Rome's European frontiers, to force the Goths and others to seek refuge inside the Empire. This prompted two generations of struggle, during which new barbarian coalitions, formed in response to Roman hostility, brought the Roman west to its knees. The Goths first destroyed a Roman army at the battle of Hadrianople in 378, and went on to sack Rome in 410. The Vandals spread devastation in Gaul and Spain, before conquering North Africa, the breadbasket of the Western Empire, in 439. We then meet Attila the Hun, whose reign of terror swept from Constantinople to Paris, but whose death in 453 ironically precipitated a final desperate phase of Roman collapse, culminating in the Vandals' defeat of the massive Byzantine Armada: the west's last chance for survival. Peter Heather convincingly argues that the Roman Empire was not on the brink of social or moral collapse. What brought it to an end were the barbarians.
Categories: History

The Romanization of Britain

The Romanization of Britain

7 THE DEVELOPED ECONOMY The economy of later Roman Britain , as seen
through the archaeological evidence , shows a ... Pottery in particular has been
widely studied to produce information about both its production and its
distribution ...

Author: Martin Millett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521428645

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 481

This book sets out to provide a new synthesis of recent archaeological work in Roman Britain.
Categories: History