Representing the South Pacific

Colonial Discourse from Cook to Gauguin

Author: Rod Edmond

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521550543

Category: History

Page: 307

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Examines representations of the South Pacific by explorers, missionaries, travellers, writers, and artists, 1767-1914.
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Migrations

Journeys in Time and Place

Author: Rod Edmond

Publisher: Bridget Williams Books

ISBN: 1927131464

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 6504

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"Traces the journeys of his Scottish forebears as they separately made their way to New Zealand. The migration story begins with Charles Murray leaving Aberdeenshire in 1884 to become a missionary on the island of Ambrym. On the other side of Scotland, Catherine McLeod and her family had already abandoned their small coastal croft and sailed for Tasmania"--Back cover.
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Katherine Mansfield and the (Post)colonial

Author: Gerri Kimber

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748669124

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 1952

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This volume addresses issues raised by Katherine Mansfield's nomadic rootlessness as an 'extraterritorial' writer. Contributions draw on postcolonial and diasporic frameworks to examine Mansfield's insights into colony and empire.
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A New Imperial History

Culture, Identity and Modernity in Britain and the Empire, 1660-1840

Author: Kathleen Wilson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521007962

Category: History

Page: 385

View: 6105

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This pioneering collection of essays charts an exciting new field in British studies, 'the new imperial history'. Leading scholars from history, literature and cultural studies tackle problems of identity, modernity and difference in eighteenth-century Britain and the empire. They examine, from interdisciplinary perspectives, the reciprocal influences of empire and culture, the movements of peoples, practices and ideas effected by slavery, diaspora and British dominance, and ways in which subaltern, non-western and non-elite people shaped British power and knowledge. The essays move through Britain, America, India, Africa and the South Pacific in testament to the networks of people, commodities and entangled pasts forged by Britain's imperial adventures. Based on ground-breaking research, these analyses of the imperial dimensions of British culture and identities in global contexts will challenge the notion that empire was something that happened 'out there', and they demonstrate its long-lasting implications for British identity and everyday life.
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Islands in History and Representation

Author: Rod Edmond

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415286664

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 7187

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"Early essays in the collection address the significance of islands in the Atlantic economy of the eighteenth century. The focus then shifts to the exploration of the Pacific, which presented Europe with new island-groups to explore, exploit, and imagine.
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Strangers in the South Seas

The Idea of the Pacific in Western Thought : an Anthology

Author: Richard Lansdown

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824829026

Category: Travel

Page: 429

View: 322

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Long before Magellan entered the Pacific in 1521 Westerners entertained ideas of undiscovered oceans, mighty continents, and paradisal islands at the far ends of the earth-such ideas would have a long life and a deep impact in both the Pacific and the West. With the discovery of Tahiti in 1767 another powerful myth was added to this collection: the noble savage. For the first time Westerners were confronted by a people who seemed happier than themselves. This revolution in the human sciences was accompanied by one in the natural sciences after Darwin's momentous visit to the Galapagos Islands. The Pacific produced other challenges for nineteenth-century researchers on race and culture, and for those intent on exporting their religions to this immense quarter of the globe. As the century wore on, the region presented opportunities and dilemmas for the imperial powers, a process was accelerated by the Pacific War between 1941 and 1945. Strangers in the South Seas recounts and illustrates this story using a wealth of primary texts. It includes generous excerpts from the work of explorers, soldiers, naturalists, anthropologists, artists, and writers--some famous, some obscure. It shows how "the Great South Sea" has been an irreplaceable "distant mirror" of the West and its intellectual obsessions since the Renaissance.
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A Companion to Folklore

Author: Regina F. Bendix,Galit Hasan-Rokem

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444354388

Category: Social Science

Page: 696

View: 3794

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A Companion to Folklore presents an original and comprehensive collection of essays from international experts in the field of folklore studies. Unprecedented in depth and scope, this state-of-the-art collection uniquely displays the vitality of folklore research across the globe. An unprecedented collection of original, state of the art essays on folklore authored by international experts Examines the practices and theoretical approaches developed to understand the phenomena of folklore Considers folklore in the context of multi-disciplinary topics that include poetics, performance, religious practice, myth, ritual and symbol, oral textuality, history, law, politics and power as well as the social base of folklore Selected by Choice as a 2013 Outstanding Academic Title
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Native American Whalemen and the World

Indigenous Encounters and the Contingency of Race

Author: Nancy Shoemaker

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469622580

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3315

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In the nineteenth century, nearly all Native American men living along the southern New England coast made their living traveling the world's oceans on whaleships. Many were career whalemen, spending twenty years or more at sea. Their labor invigorated economically depressed reservations with vital income and led to complex and surprising connections with other Indigenous peoples, from the islands of the Pacific to the Arctic Ocean. At home, aboard ship, or around the world, Native American seafarers found themselves in a variety of situations, each with distinct racial expectations about who was "Indian" and how "Indians" behaved. Treated by their white neighbors as degraded dependents incapable of taking care of themselves, Native New Englanders nevertheless rose to positions of command at sea. They thereby complicated myths of exploration and expansion that depicted cultural encounters as the meeting of two peoples, whites and Indians. Highlighting the shifting racial ideologies that shaped the lives of these whalemen, Nancy Shoemaker shows how the category of "Indian" was as fluid as the whalemen were mobile.
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Christian Missions and the Enlightenment

Author: Brian Stanley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136865616

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 1967

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Addresses the nature of the influence of the European Enlightenment on the beliefs and practice of the Protestant missionaries who went to Asia and Africa from the mid-eighteenth century onwards, particularly British missions and the formative role of the Scottish Enlightenment on their thinking.
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Dark Vanishings

Discourse on the Extinction of Primitive Races, 1800-1930

Author: Patrick Brantlinger

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801468671

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 3432

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Patrick Brantlinger here examines the commonly held nineteenth-century view that all "primitive" or "savage" races around the world were doomed sooner or later to extinction. Warlike propensities and presumed cannibalism were regarded as simultaneously noble and suicidal, accelerants of the downfall of other races after contact with white civilization. Brantlinger finds at the heart of this belief the stereotype of the self-exterminating savage, or the view that "savagery" is a sufficient explanation for the ultimate disappearance of "savages" from the grand theater of world history. Humanitarians, according to Brantlinger, saw the problem in the same terms of inevitability (or doom) as did scientists such as Charles Darwin and Thomas Henry Huxley as well as propagandists for empire such as Charles Wentworth Dilke and James Anthony Froude. Brantlinger analyzes the Irish Famine in the context of ideas and theories about primitive races in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and elsewhere. He shows that by the end of the nineteenth century, especially through the influence of the eugenics movement, extinction discourse was ironically applied to "the great white race" in various apocalyptic formulations. With the rise of fascism and Nazism, and with the gradual renewal of aboriginal populations in some parts of the world, by the 1930s the stereotypic idea of "fatal impact" began to unravel, as did also various more general forms of race-based thinking and of social Darwinism.
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