The Complete Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon, Book 1 (Vol. 1-3)

Author: C. H. Spurgeon

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1329007239

Category: Religion

Page: 502

View: 2525

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The story of Charles Haddon Spurgeon's life is nothing less than titanic. Within 2 years and 6 months of accepting the pastorate of the New Park Street Chapel as a boy of 19, the Sunday service grew from 242 to over 7,000 in attendance. What can account for the meteoric rise in popularity? Why did so many wish to hear his sermons? It is the same reason why one ought to study the sermons of Spurgeon to this day: in a famished land of moralism, he preached the bread of Jesus Christ. Containing the first three volumes of the sixty-three volumes published from the Metropolitan Tabernacle pulpit, this book holds 164 sermons, 'as plump as a partridge, and as full of meat as an egg.' David A. Attebury is currently pursuing a Masters of Divinity from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.
Release

Reading for Redemption

Practical Christian Criticism

Author: Christian R. Davis

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1498273459

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 130

View: 3616

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The goal of this book is to define and explain the archetypal pattern of redemption that underlies our whole notion of resolution in literature and to demonstrate, through multiple examples, that successful literature--poems and stories that have shown endurance or popularity--uses this pattern in specific ways. This theory should help readers to interpret both particular works of literature and the general notion of literature. The pattern of redemption employed here, in its ideal form, involves the sacrifice of an innocent redeemer to save something that has been lost. Because this pattern of redemption is typically associated with Christianity, this book can be taken as proposing a Christian theory of criticism. Current textbooks on literary criticism and theory cover a range of perspectives, such as Marxism, feminism, multiculturalism, reader response, and queer theory, but they invariably ignore the field of Christian criticism. Therefore, this book may be most useful as a supplementary text for courses in literary criticism that might include a Christian perspective. At the same time, however, the terms and methodology proposed here are not exclusive to or dependant on Christian beliefs, so readers of all types may find this approach useful. The greatest strength of this book is its application of the theory to numerous examples from a wide range of genres and periods of literature, testing the theory on classical and Shakespearean works such as the Iliad and Odyssey, Hamlet and Coriolanus; best sellers such as The Lord of the Rings, Le Petit Prince, Valley of the Dolls, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows; horror stories such as Frankenstein; postcolonial novels such as Things Fall Apart and The Kite Runner; and lyric poems. Consequently, even readers who are skeptical of the assumptions used here should find the many concrete examples thought-provoking.
Release