Reading History in Early Modern England

Reading History in Early Modern England

A study of writing, publishing and marketing history books in the early modern period.

Author: D. R. Woolf

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521780462

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 371

A study of writing, publishing and marketing history books in the early modern period.
Categories: History

Reading Material in Early Modern England

Reading Material in Early Modern England

Reading Material in Early Modern England rediscovers the practices and representations of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English readers.

Author: Heidi Brayman Hackel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521842514

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 322

View: 681

Reading Material in Early Modern England rediscovers the practices and representations of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English readers. By telling their stories and insisting upon their variety, Brayman Hackel displaces both the singular 'ideal' reader of literacy theory and the elite male reader of literacy history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading the Roman Republic in Early Modern England

Reading the Roman Republic in Early Modern England

Woolf, D. R., The Idea of History in Early Stuart England: erudition, ideology, and
the light of truth from the accession of JamesI to the Civil War (Toronto, 1990).
Woolf, D. R., 'Little Crosby and the Horizons of Early Modern Historical Culture' in
 ...

Author: Freyja Cox Jensen

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004233034

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 795

Placing the reading of history in its cultural and educational context, and examining the processes by which ideas about ancient Rome circulated, this study provides the first assessment of the significance of Roman history, broadly conceived, in early modern England.
Categories: History

Reading Authority and Representing Rule in Early Modern England

Reading Authority and Representing Rule in Early Modern England

Examples are drawn from a broad range of source, including royal portraits, architecture, coins and medals and written texts.This is a volume that presents the history of society and state as a cultural as well as an institutional or ...

Author: Kevin Sharpe

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441145581

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 912

Reading Authority and Representing Rule in Early Modern England explores the publication and reception of authority in early modern England. Examples are drawn from a broad range of source, including royal portraits, architecture, coins and medals and written texts.This is a volume that presents the history of society and state as a cultural as well as an institutional or political history. The author, Kevin Sharpe, was a leading scholar in interdisciplinary approaches to the study of early modern Britain. He pioneered the application of methods and approaches from other disciplines, such as literary criticism, reception studies and visual culture, to the study of the English Renaissance state. This will be an important text for anyone studying early modern England, as well as for those interested in the methods of cultural history and the explication of written and visual texts.
Categories: History

Women Reading and the Cultural Politics of Early Modern England

Women  Reading  and the Cultural Politics of Early Modern England

A study of the representation of reading in early modern Englishwomen's writing, this book exists at the intersection of textual criticism and cultural history.

Author: Edith Snook, Dr

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781351871495

Category:

Page:

View: 808

A study of the representation of reading in early modern Englishwomen's writing, this book exists at the intersection of textual criticism and cultural history. It looks at depictions of reading in women's printed devotional works, maternal advice books, poetry, and fiction, as well as manuscripts, for evidence of ways in which women conceived of reading in sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England. Among the authors and texts considered are Katherine Parr, Lamentation of a Sinner; Anne Askew, The Examinations of Anne Askew; Dorothy Leigh, The Mothers Blessing; Elizabeth Grymeston, Miscelanea Meditations Memoratives; Aemelia Lanyer, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum; and Mary Wroth, The First Part of the Countess of Montgomery's Urania. Attentive to contiguities between representations of reading in print and reading practices found in manuscript culture, this book also examines a commonplace book belonging to Anne Cornwallis (Folger Folger MS V.a.89) and a Passion poem presented by Elizabeth Middleton to Sarah Edmondes (Bod. MS Don. e.17). Edith Snook here makes an original contribution to the ongoing scholarly project of historicizing reading by foregrounding female writers of the early modern period. She explores how women's representations of reading negotiate the dynamic relationship between the public and private spheres and investigates how women might have been affected by changing ideas about literacy, as well as how they sought to effect change in devotional and literary reading practices. Finally, because the activity of reading is a site of cultural conflict - over gender, social and educational status, and the religious or national affiliation of readers - Snook brings to light how these women, when they write about reading, are engaged in structuring the cultural politics of early modern England.
Categories:

Reading Shakespeare s Poems in Early Modern England

Reading Shakespeare   s Poems in Early Modern England

This is the first comprehensive study of early modern texts, readings, and readers of Shakespeare's poems in print and manuscript, Reading Shakespeare's Poems in Early Modern England makes a compelling contribution both to Shakespeare ...

Author: S. Roberts

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230286849

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 699

This is the first comprehensive study of early modern texts, readings, and readers of Shakespeare's poems in print and manuscript, Reading Shakespeare's Poems in Early Modern England makes a compelling contribution both to Shakespeare studies and the history of the book. Examining gendered readerships and the use of erotic works, reading practises and manuscript culture, textual forms and transmission, literary taste and the canonisation of Shakespeare, this book argues that historicist criticism can no longer ignore histories of reading.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Illustrating the Past in Early Modern England

Illustrating the Past in Early Modern England

Through a close examination of the relationship of image to text in light of contemporary discussions of poetic and aesthetic practice, the book demonstrates that the struggle between the image and the word played a profoundly important ...

Author: James A. Knapp

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351928908

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 322

View: 205

Illustrating the Past is a study of the status of visual and verbal media in early modern English representations of the past. It focuses on general attitudes towards visual and verbal representations of history as well as specific illustrated books produced during the period. Through a close examination of the relationship of image to text in light of contemporary discussions of poetic and aesthetic practice, the book demonstrates that the struggle between the image and the word played a profoundly important role in England's emergent historical self-awareness. The opposition between history and story, fact and fiction, often tenuous, provided a sounding board for deeper conflicts over the form in which representations might best yield truth from history. The ensuing schism between poets and historians over the proper venue for the lessons of the past manifested itself on the pages of early modern printed books. The discussion focuses on the word and image relationships in several important illustrated books printed during the second half of the sixteenth century-including Holinshed's Chronicles (1577) and Foxe's Book of Martyrs (1563, 1570)-in the context of contemporary works on history and poetics, such as Sir Philip Sidney's Apology for Poetry and Thomas Blundeville's The true order and Method of wryting and reading Hystories. Illustrating the Past specifically answers two important questions concerning the resultant production of literary and historical texts in the period: Why did the use of images in printed histories suddenly become unpopular at the end of the sixteenth century? and What impact did this publishing trend have on writers of literary and historical texts?
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading Sensations in Early Modern England

Reading Sensations in Early Modern England

This book argues that a new aesthetic vocabulary based on the theory of the passions was formulated in the Renaissance to describe the affective power of literature.

Author: K. Craik

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230206083

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 788

How did Renaissance literature affect readers' minds, bodies and souls? In what ways did the history of literary experience overlap with the history of humours and emotions? This book argues that a new aesthetic vocabulary based on the theory of the passions was formulated in the Renaissance to describe the affective power of literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Uses of History in Early Modern England

The Uses of History in Early Modern England

The essays give the history of both religion and politics their proper place, and put historical writing in the context of other literary activities.

Author: Paulina Kewes

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0873282191

Category: History

Page: 449

View: 215

Publisher Description
Categories: History

Books and Readers in Early Modern England

Books and Readers in Early Modern England

The essays draw on an array of documentary evidence—from library catalogs, prefaces, title pages and dedications, marginalia, commonplace books, and letters to ink, paper, and bindings—to explore individual reading habits and ...

Author: Jennifer Andersen

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812204711

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 404

Books and Readers in Early Modern England examines readers, reading, and publication practices from the Renaissance to the Restoration. The essays draw on an array of documentary evidence—from library catalogs, prefaces, title pages and dedications, marginalia, commonplace books, and letters to ink, paper, and bindings—to explore individual reading habits and experiences in a period of religious dissent, political instability, and cultural transformation. Chapters in the volume cover oral, scribal, and print cultures, examining the emergence of the "public spheres" of reading practices. Contributors, who include Christopher Grose, Ann Hughes, David Scott Kastan, Kathleen Lynch, William Sherman, and Peter Stallybrass, investigate interactions among publishers, texts, authors, and audience. They discuss the continuity of the written word and habits of mind in the world of print, the formation and differentiation of readerships, and the increasing influence of public opinion. The work demonstrates that early modern publications appeared in a wide variety of forms—from periodical literature to polemical pamphlets—and reflected the radical transformations occurring at the time in the dissemination of knowledge through the written word. These forms were far more ephemeral, and far more widely available, than modern stereotypes of writing from this period suggest.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Local Identities in Late Medieval and Early Modern England

Local Identities in Late Medieval and Early Modern England

Catherine F . Patterson is Associate Professor of History and Associate Dean of
the College of Liberal Arts and Social ... Among his books are The Idea of History
in Early Stuart England ( 1990 ) , Reading History in Early Modern England ...

Author: Norman L. Jones

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: STANFORD:36105123359882

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 342

It is axiomatic that English people came to understand their places in society differently by the late seventeenth century. This collection explores how that happened by exploring how membership in communities was defined, and how individuals and corporate groups acted out their understanding of their places in society. Keith Wrightson’s powerful exploration of how concepts of neighborliness evolved as the economy changed is joined with Marjorie K. McIntosh’s work on changing identity politics in market towns. The confusions over identity and community inherent in border towns are taken up by K.J. Kesselring, while David Dean examines the mnemonic devices used in the Elizabethan Lottery to understand how people saw their communities. The overlapping worlds of London, Court and country are portrayed by Alexandra Johnston and Joseph Ward, while Catherine Patterson looks at the rhetoric of urban magistracy. The complexity of London’s communities is explored by Shannon McSheffrey in her work on the liminal place of the late medieval clergy and sexual morality; by Ian Archer in his portrait of the charity of London widows; and by Paul Griffiths in a concluding chapter on the rhetorics of London’s civil and religious identity, as seen in the discussions of growth that swirled around the building of Bridewell Hospital.
Categories: History

Women s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England

Women   s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England

This collection reveals the valuable work that women achieved in publishing, printing, writing and reading early modern English books, from those who worked in the book trade to those who composed, selected, collected and annotated books.

Author: Valerie Wayne

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350110021

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 397

This collection reveals the valuable work that women achieved in publishing, printing, writing and reading early modern English books, from those who worked in the book trade to those who composed, selected, collected and annotated books. Women gathered rags for paper production, invested in books and oversaw the presses that printed them. Their writing and reading had an impact on their contemporaries and the developing literary canon. A focus on women's work enables these essays to recognize the various forms of labour -- textual and social as well as material and commercial -- that women of different social classes engaged in. Those considered include the very poor, the middling sort who were active in the book trade, and the elite women authors and readers who participated in literary communities. Taken together, these essays convey the impressive work that women accomplished and their frequent collaborations with others in the making, marking, and marketing of early modern English books.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe

The collaborative research of this book covers four themes: the affective world; practical knowledge for life; politics and religion; arts, science and humanities.

Author: Amanda L. Capern

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000709599

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 238

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe is a comprehensive and ground-breaking survey of the lives of women in early-modern Europe between 1450 and 1750. Covering a period of dramatic political and cultural change, the book challenges the current contours and chronologies of European history by observing them through the lens of female experience. The collaborative research of this book covers four themes: the affective world; practical knowledge for life; politics and religion; arts, science and humanities. These themes are interwoven through the chapters, which encompass all areas of women’s lives: sexuality, emotions, health and wellbeing, educational attainment, litigation and the practical and leisured application of knowledge, skills and artistry from medicine to theology. The intellectual lives of women, through reading and writing, and their spirituality and engagement with the material world, are also explored. So too is the sheer energy of female work, including farming and manufacture, skilled craft and artwork, theatrical work and scientific enquiry. The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe revises the chronological and ideological parameters of early-modern European history by opening the reader’s eyes to an exciting age of female productivity, social engagement and political activism across European and transatlantic boundaries. It is essential reading for students and researchers of early-modern history, the history of women and gender studies.
Categories: History

Women Beauty and Power in Early Modern England

Women  Beauty and Power in Early Modern England

Divided into three sections on cosmetics, clothes and hairstyling, this book explores how early modern women regarded beauty culture and in what ways skin, clothes and hair could be used to represent racial, class and gender identities, and ...

Author: Edith Snook

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230302235

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 395

Divided into three sections on cosmetics, clothes and hairstyling, this book explores how early modern women regarded beauty culture and in what ways skin, clothes and hair could be used to represent racial, class and gender identities, and to convey political, religious and philosophical ideals.
Categories: Social Science

Blood Bodies and Families in Early Modern England

Blood  Bodies and Families in Early Modern England

This text gives readers an overview of how feminist historians have been interpreting the history of the family, ever since Laurence Stone's seminal work : Family, sex, and marriage in England (1977).

Author: Patricia M. Crawford

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 0582405130

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 325

This text gives readers an overview of how feminist historians have been interpreting the history of the family, ever since Laurence Stone's seminal work : Family, sex, and marriage in England (1977). The text is divided into three parts on the following themes: bodies and reproduction; maternity from a feminist perspective; and family relationships.
Categories: History

A Concise History of History

A Concise History of History

This is a truly global account of the process of progressive intercultural contact that led to the hegemony of Western historiographical methods.

Author: Daniel Woolf

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108697064

Category: History

Page:

View: 506

This short history of history is an ideal introduction for those studying or teaching the subject as part of courses on the historian's craft, historical theory and method, and historiography. Spanning the earliest known forms of historical writing in the ancient Near East right through to the present and covering developments in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas, it also touches on the latest topics and debates in the field, such as 'Big History', 'Deep History' and the impact of the electronic age. It features timelines listing major dynasties or regimes throughout the world alongside historiographical developments; guides to key thinkers and seminal historical works; further reading; a glossary of terms; and sample questions to promote further debate at the end of each chapter. This is a truly global account of the process of progressive intercultural contact that led to the hegemony of Western historiographical methods.
Categories: History

Reading Green in Early Modern England

Reading Green in Early Modern England

Unveiling various versions and interpretations of green, this book offers a cultural history of a color that illuminates the distinctive valences greenness possessed in early modern culture.

Author: Leah Knight

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317071228

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 180

View: 907

Green in early modern England did not mean what it does today; but what did it mean? Unveiling various versions and interpretations of green, this book offers a cultural history of a color that illuminates the distinctive valences greenness possessed in early modern culture. While treating green as a panacea for anything from sore eyes to sick minds, early moderns also perceived verdure as responsive to their verse, sympathetic to their sufferings, and endowed with surprising powers of animation. Author Leah Knight explores the physical and figurative potentials of green as they were understood in Renaissance England, including some that foreshadow our paradoxical dependence on and sacrifice of the green world. Ranging across contexts from early modern optics and olfaction to horticulture and herbal health care, this study explores a host of human encounters with the green world: both the impressions we make upon it and those it leaves with us. The first two chapters consider the value placed on two ways of taking green into early modern bodies and minds-by seeing it and breathing it in-while the next two address the manipulation of greenery by Orphic poets and medicinal herbalists as well as grafters and graffiti artists. A final chapter suggests that early modern modes of treating green wounds might point toward a new kind of intertextual ecology of reading and writing. Reading Green in Early Modern England mines many pages from the period - not literally but tropically, metaphorically green - that cultivate a variety of unexpected meanings of green and the atmosphere and powers it exuded in the early modern world.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading the Early Modern Passions

Reading the Early Modern Passions

In speaking to the question of the historicity and variability of emotions within individuals, several of these essays investigate specific emotions, such as sadness, courage, and fear.

Author: Gail Kern Paster

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812218725

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 894

How translatable is the language of the emotions across cultures and time? What connotations of particular emotions, strongly felt in the early modern period, have faded or shifted completely in our own? If Western culture has traditionally held emotion to be hostile to reason and the production of scientific knowledge, why and how have the passions been lauded as windows to higher truths? Assessing the changing discourses of feeling and their relevance to the cultural history of affect, Reading the Early Modern Passions offers fourteen interdisciplinary essays on the meanings and representations of the emotional universe of Renaissance Europe in literature, music, and art. Many in the early modern era were preoccupied by the relation of passion to action and believed the passions to be a natural force requiring stringent mental and physical disciplines. In speaking to the question of the historicity and variability of emotions within individuals, several of these essays investigate specific emotions, such as sadness, courage, and fear. Other essays turn to emotions spread throughout society by contemporary events, such as a ruler's death, the outbreak of war, or religious schism, and discuss how such emotions have widespread consequences in both social practice and theory. Addressing anxieties about the power of emotions; their relation to the public good; their centrality in promoting or disturbing an individual's relation to God, to monarch, and to fellow human beings, the authors also look at the ways emotion serves as a marker or determinant of gender, ethnicity, and humanity. Contributors to the volume include Zirka Filipczak, Victoria Kahn, Michael Schoenfeldt, Bruce Smith, Richard Strier, and Gary Tomlinson.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Readers Audiences and Coteries in Early Modern England

Readers  Audiences and Coteries in Early Modern England

This book draws on and contributes to the wealth of recent research in the history of the book and the history of reading.

Author: Geoff Baker

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN: STANFORD:36105123331832

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 120

View: 483

This book draws on and contributes to the wealth of recent research in the history of the book and the history of reading. All six case studies contained here are linked by the general theme of how a particular text, or type of text, may have been appropriated by an individual, a group of readers, or the author themselves. The contributors consider how the physical form of the text impacts on its readership, concluding that early modern texts do not hold a fixed meaning but are instead interpreted and appropriated in a different manner by each individual reader. Through discussions of a range of different publications, the contributors to this volume describe a period that was both vibrant and inventive in its literary output. The extension of literacy and the increased access to written material made possible by the printing press raised concerns of legitimacy and reputation, an aspect explored here in relation to the publication of plays, as well as concerns over the efficacy and role of censorship within the literary marketplace. This volume seeks to add a further contribution to the increasing interdisciplinary dialogue over the history of the book, the history of reading and the networks of exchange involved in the 'textual culture' of early modern England. Concerned with reading practices throughout the period, the contributors come from the fields of both English and history and provide a variety of new interpretations on the presentation of texts, the aims of their authors, and the ways in which their audiences received them. The range of literary and historical material covered within the chapters of this volume represents a valuable reinforcement of the need for interdisciplinary study through a demonstration of the benefits of collaboration between literary and historical scholars.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Godly Reading

Godly Reading

In contrast to long-standing claims about the connections between advanced Protestantism and emergent individualism and interiority, the book demonstrates the importance of communal and public forms of reading in the practice of godly piety ...

Author: Andrew Cambers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107692245

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 507

This innovative study explores the history of Puritanism and the history of reading in the long seventeenth century. Drawing on a wide range of significant but understudied source materials, it seeks to advance our understanding of Puritan or 'godly' culture by examining the place of reading within that culture between c.1580 and 1720. In contrast to long-standing claims about the connections between advanced Protestantism and emergent individualism and interiority, the book demonstrates the importance of communal and public forms of reading in the practice of godly piety. Andrew Cambers employs a novel framework, based around the spaces and places of early modern reading, to offer a revised understanding of the nature of Puritanism and of the practice and representation of reading during the period. Moving beyond existing interpretations, Godly Reading opens up fresh discussions and debates about the nature of early modern reading and religion.
Categories: History