Railroad Depots of Central Ohio

Railroad Depots of Central Ohio

Railroad Depots of Central Ohio offers a pictorial history of selected depots, centering around Columbus and Franklin County, using old postcards and vintage photographs.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738561746

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 998

By the mid-1850s, the railroad craze had hit central Ohio. Pioneer railroads that were to evolve into portions of the Baltimore and Ohio, New York Central, and Pennsylvania Railroads connected the state capital, Columbus, with the canals, Lake Erie, and the Ohio River. The region was crisscrossed by numerous other lines by 1880; Columbus became the main hub while other railroad centers included Circleville, Delaware, Mansfield, Mount Vernon, Newark, and Zanesville. Hundreds of depots were built throughout central Ohio to serve railroad passengers and to handle baggage, mail, and freight. Depots became the center of commerce and activity at communities--big and small. With the discontinuance of passenger trains across the Buckeye State, many depots disappeared from trackside--many simply demolished, others relocated for non-railroad uses. Railroad Depots of Central Ohio offers a pictorial history of selected depots, centering around Columbus and Franklin County, using old postcards and vintage photographs.
Categories: History

Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio

Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio

Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio shares a tale of the golden age of rail travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th-century photographs of selected depots and other railroad structures.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439632895

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 121

Twelve railroad lines served west central Ohio around 1907 and were the lifeblood of the communities they ran through. Bellefontaine, Bradford, and Crestline became major terminals, and lesser known places like Dola, Ohio City, and Peoria also owe their existence to the iron horse. Around 300 depots served the west central region, with the earliest dating to the late 1840s. The depot was the center of activity in the smallest village to the largest city. Many of the depots no longer exist—victims of progress, nature, or neglect. Some survive as historical museums, various businesses, and residences; a few remain in railroad use. The proud history of railroading lives on in the restored depots at Bucyrus and Galion—two architectural gems of the Buckeye State. Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio shares a tale of the golden age of rail travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th-century photographs of selected depots and other railroad structures.
Categories: Transportation

Railroad Depots of East Central Ohio

Railroad Depots of East Central Ohio

The hilly Alleghany Plateau of eastern Ohio was crossed by a number of primarily east-west rail lines heading toward Chicago, St. Louis, and ports on the Mississippi River during the latter part of the 19th century.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Images of Rail

ISBN: 1540235211

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 203

The hilly Alleghany Plateau of eastern Ohio was crossed by a number of primarily east-west rail lines heading toward Chicago, St. Louis, and ports on the Mississippi River during the latter part of the 19th century. These lines, eventually part of the Baltimore & Ohio, Erie, New York Central, Nickel Plate, and Pennsylvania systems, were joined by shorter lines extending from Lake Erie to the Ohio River, most notably the Wheeling & Lake Erie, designed to tap the coal and clay riches of the region. In order to serve the populace, railroad depots were needed. Smaller communities like Dalton and Dundee received typical combination depots designed to provide passenger, baggage, and freight accommodations. Separate passenger and freight depots were erected in larger communities, including Ashland and Canton. The arrival of the automobile brought a decline to local passenger service and a closing of depots. Some depots continued to serve the railroads in other ways and others were sold and moved from trackside, but many were demolished. Few remain today.
Categories: History

Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio

Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio

Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio offers a glimpse into these golden years of train travel through the use of early postcards and photographs of selected depots and related structures.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738551155

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 497

The first rail lines in northeast Ohio opened for business in July 1850, and by the 1890s, northeast Ohio was laced with railroad tracks. Cleveland was the hub of railroad activity, and important rail-served lake ports developed at Ashtabula, Conneaut, Fairport Harbor, Huron, and Lorain. Akron became a center of southerly east-west lines. Over 310 passenger and combination depots were established at various points along the railroads to serve the needs of passengers traveling throughout northeast Ohio. Depots were the focal point of communities--news arrived over their telegraphs, traveling salesmen gathered on the trackside platforms, depot staff maneuvered four-wheel wagons loaded with baggage, parcels, and milk cans, locals gathered to meet, greet, and send off family and friends. The depot was a veritable beehive of activity at train time. Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio offers a glimpse into these golden years of train travel through the use of early postcards and photographs of selected depots and related structures.
Categories: History

Railroads Depots of Northwest Ohio

Railroads Depots of Northwest Ohio

Only a few depots were built after the NYC takeover , the most obvious being Central Union Terminal in Toledo . Although all the lines had standard depot plans , little repetition of design is evident in northwest Ohio , except along ...

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738534013

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 178

Chartered as early as 1832, Northwestern Ohio railroads were among the first in the Midwest. Toledo, a rapidly developing lake port at the mouth of the Maumee River, was the destination point for many lines; others were just passing through on their way to Chicago and points west. By 1907, 20 lines served the northwestern counties. All had a series of stations along their lines, often with depots or other railroad structures. Although many have come and gone, Northwest Ohio was once home to over 250 passenger or combination depots serving the traveling public. Railroad Depots of Northwest Ohio relives the golden age of railroad travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th century photos of selected depots and related structures.
Categories: History

Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio

Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio

With the decline of rail passenger service, depots became unnecessary--many were demolished. Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio presents a pictorial look at a sampling of these grand structures when they were in their prime.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738584150

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 964

Springfield was the original destination of the two oldest railroad companies to lay rails in Ohio, the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad and the Little Miami Railroad. This would form the first rail link between Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Other routes became more important as rails eventually spread like spokes of a wheel from Cincinnati, and connections were made to Akron, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Indianapolis, Lexington, Louisville, Marietta, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Toledo as well as many other cities by the late 1800s. Hundreds of depots were erected to serve train travelers, ranging from the smallest shelter to the standard combined passenger-freight building to the major city passenger terminal. Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield became railroad centers, and towns like Blanchester, Hamilton, Loveland, Middletown, Morrow, Wilmington, and Xenia, served by more than one line, became busy transfer points. With the decline of rail passenger service, depots became unnecessary--many were demolished. Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio presents a pictorial look at a sampling of these grand structures when they were in their prime.
Categories: History

Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio

Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio

The design has a decided New York Central influence. In this view from 1931, New York Central's Ohio State Limited heads east past the depot. (Dan E. Finfrock collection.) This Big Four depot was originally erected at Kyles, but.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439641071

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 825

Springfield was the original destination of the two oldest railroad companies to lay rails in Ohio, the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad and the Little Miami Railroad. This would form the first rail link between Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Other routes became more important as rails eventually spread like spokes of a wheel from Cincinnati, and connections were made to Akron, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Indianapolis, Lexington, Louisville, Marietta, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Toledo as well as many other cities by the late 1800s. Hundreds of depots were erected to serve train travelers, ranging from the smallest shelter to the standard combined passenger-freight building to the major city passenger terminal. Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield became railroad centers, and towns like Blanchester, Hamilton, Loveland, Middletown, Morrow, Wilmington, and Xenia, served by more than one line, became busy transfer points. With the decline of rail passenger service, depots became unnecessary—many were demolished. Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio presents a pictorial look at a sampling of these grand structures when they were in their prime.
Categories: Transportation

United States Congressional Serial Set

United States Congressional Serial Set

Railroad fare , Little Rock to Saint Louis Supper at depot , Little Rock Sleeper , Little Rock to Saint Louis .. 21. Carriage to hotel , Saint Louis ... Railroad fare , Saint Louis to Columbus , Ohio . Sleeper , Saint Louis to Columbus ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3987031

Category:

Page:

View: 907

Categories:

American Railroad Journal

American Railroad Journal

The three main lines Railroad Depots and Steamboat Landings . to New York , Philadelphia , and Baltimore , are all ... Floyd - Jones , Charles , year ; the central line to Richmond and thence to Dayton , Ohio , is mostly under contract ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951000877136R

Category: Civil engineering

Page:

View: 306

Categories: Civil engineering

Laws and Ordinances for the Government of the City

Laws and Ordinances for the Government of the City

Liens not released . Coinmencement . CENTRAL OHIO RAILROAD COMPANY . AN ACT To authorize the Central Ohio railroad company to acquire a depot in the city of Wheeling . ( Passed April 8th . 1823. ) in relation thereto . Land for depot .

Author: Wheeling (W. Va.).

Publisher:

ISBN: COLUMBIA:CU56559577

Category:

Page: 572

View: 402

Categories:

House Documents Otherwise Publ as Executive Documents

House Documents  Otherwise Publ  as Executive Documents

Guernsey : Central Ohio Railroad passes through the county . Columbiana : railroad across north part of county ; markets at six stations . Stark : 4 miles on an average . Jefferson : county bordered by Ohio River and railroad , and one ...

Author: United States. Congress. House

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:555038375

Category: United States

Page:

View: 214

Categories: United States

Congressional Record

Congressional Record

Columbus , Ohio Commissioner of Education Bills to erect public building at ( see bills S. 1501 ; H. R. 1275 , 4458. ) ... Railroad depot : report of engineer commissioner on site for Resolution of H. R. to appoint ...

Author: United States. Congress

Publisher:

ISBN: UCR:31210018786622

Category: Law

Page:

View: 805

Categories: Law

Railway Locomotives and Cars

Railway Locomotives and Cars

CENTRAL OHIO RAILROAD . and there is an immediate and certain market on the property in supplying the laboring population at the To Contractors . PROPO ROPOSALS will be received at the office of works with the products of the farm .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X002211475

Category: Railroad engineering

Page:

View: 663

Categories: Railroad engineering

Annual Report of the Attorney General of the United States

Annual Report of the Attorney General of the United States

Supper at Chicago , Ill Conveyance to depot Pennsylvania Railroad , Chicago , Ill .. Railroad fare Chicago , Ill . , to Washington , D. C. Sleeping - car Chicago , Ill . , to Washington , D. C 21. Breakfast , Columbus , Ohio .

Author: United States. Department of Justice

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015053587435

Category: Justice, Administration of

Page:

View: 525

Categories: Justice, Administration of

Railroad Depots of Southern Indiana

Railroad Depots of Southern Indiana

The brick passenger depot shown here is a B & O depot located at Madison Avenue and Main Street Still in use by ... The Ohio & Mississippi , the Baltimore & Ohio , the Pennsylvania , and the New York Central Railroads converged here .

Author: David E. Longest

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738539589

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 964

Did you know that Greene County in Indiana has one of the longest land-crossing railroad trestles in the Midwest? Are you aware that the Southern Railway once used half of the railroad tunnels in the state? Indiana's first railroad, built in Shelbyville, was only a mile long, but in 1847, completion of a major steam railroad from Madison to Indianapolis made the state's capital a center of transportation. Unlike canals, railroads could be built just about anywhere. Southern Indiana's quickly growing network of rail lines was able to haul tons of goods at low cost, and enabled settlers to travel great distances in a single day. Railroad Depots of Southern Indiana takes the reader on a journey through the towns and cities that shape Indiana's railroad lore. Images depict regional rail history from the inner workings of now demolished depots to one of the oldest "short lines" in Indiana. Through more than 200 vintage photographs, author David E. Longest documents locomotives, rail equipment, the moving of stock, depots, rail stations, and freight houses, and finishes with a tour of the rail museums and excursions that still allow tourists and aficionados to "ride the rails."
Categories: History

Wisconsin Reports

Wisconsin Reports

I have been engaged in managing railroads , and know the manner in ... since the last term of this court , I have been to the depot of the Central Ohio Railroad , at Zanesville , Ohio , to examine the books of the station office in ...

Author: Wisconsin. Supreme Court

Publisher:

ISBN: SRLF:A0011610037

Category: Law reports, digests, etc

Page:

View: 946

Categories: Law reports, digests, etc

Railroad Depots of Michigan

Railroad Depots of Michigan

This volume portrays some of Michigan's finest railroad stations during their heyday in the second decade of the 20th century.

Author: David J. Mrozek

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738551929

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 909

Michigan has a rich railroad history, which began in November 1836, when the Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad initiated service between Toledo, Ohio, and Adrian, Michigan. That first Erie and Kalamazoo train consisted of stagecoach-like vehicles linked together and pulled by horses. Steam locomotive-hauled trains were still eight months in the future. As these new transportation entities grew and prospered, they put in place more elaborate station buildings in the communities they served. By the end of the 19th century, some of the larger railroad stations being built in Michigan were works of art in their own right. But whatever size and form they took, railroad stations were uniquely styled buildings, and there was generally no mistaking them for anything else. This volume portrays some of Michigan's finest railroad stations during their heyday in the second decade of the 20th century.
Categories: History

The Railroad Station

The Railroad Station

Railroad stations (continued) Cleveland: Union Terminal (1925-29), 132 Colchester: (1846), 54 n. Collinsville, Conn., 52 f. Cologne: Hauptbahnhof (1889-94), 80, 117 f., 136, Fig. 149, k; Deutz (191224), 173 Columbus, Ohio: Union Depot ...

Author: Carroll L. V. Meeks

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486286273

Category: Architecture

Page: 203

View: 953

Profusely illustrated book chronicles the evolution of the architecture of the railroad station in both Europe and America from the 1830s to the 1950s. "Carefully documented by all the apparatus of exacting scholarship, and even better by a fascinating collection of more than 230 pictures." — The New York Times.
Categories: Architecture