Louisiana History

Louisiana History

Louisiana History 3 ( Fall 1962 ) : 297-315 . Adapted from the author's M.A. thesis , Louisiana State University , 1959 . ... Rachel Swayze O'Connor ( 1774-1846 ) 2117 Craven , Avery O. Rachel of Old Louisiana .

Author: Florence M. Jumonville

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313282404

Category: Reference

Page: 782

View: 753

Provides a comprehensive guide to the literature of Louisiana history.
Categories: Reference

Runaway Slaves

Runaway Slaves

Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press , 1989 . Blockson , Charles L. Hippocrene Guide ... Advice Among Masters : The Ideal in Slave Management in the Old South . Westport , Conn . ... Craven , Avery O. Rachel of Old Louisiana .

Author: John Hope Franklin

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195084519

Category: History

Page: 455

View: 568

Presents details about plantation life before the Civil War when slaves frequently rebelled against their masters and escaped
Categories: History

Magnolia Mound

Magnolia Mound

Translated from the French Lafayette in America by A. Levasseur , Lafayette's secretary , who accompanied him on his American travels . Craven , Avery O. Rachel of Old Louisiana . Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press , 1975.

Author: Bannon, Lois Elmer

Publisher: Pelican Publishing

ISBN: 1455608084

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The Sugar Masters

The Sugar Masters

Planters and Slaves in Louisiana's Cane World, 1820--1860 Richard Follett ... Butler, W. E. Down among the Sugar Cane: The Story of Louisiana Sugar Plantations and Their Railroads. ... Craven, Avery O. Rachel of Old Louisiana.

Author: Richard Follett

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807132470

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 788

Focusing on the master-slave relationship in Louisiana's antebellum sugarcane country, The Sugar Masters explores how a modern, capitalist mind-set among planters meshed with old-style paternalistic attitudes to create one of the South's most insidiously oppressive labor systems. As author Richard Follett vividly demonstrates, the agricultural paradise of Louisiana's thriving sugarcane fields came at an unconscionable cost to slaves. Thanks to technological and business innovations, sugar planters stood as models of capitalist entrepreneurship by midcentury. But above all, labor management was the secret to their impressive success. Follett explains how in exchange for increased productivity and efficiency they offered their slaves a range of incentives, such as greater autonomy, improved accommodations, and even financial remuneration. These material gains, however, were only short term. According to Follett, many of Louisiana's sugar elite presented their incentives with a "facade of paternal reciprocity" that seemingly bound the slaves' interests to the apparent goodwill of the masters, but in fact, the owners sought to control every aspect of the slaves's lives, from reproduction to discretionary income. Slaves responded to this display of paternalism by trying to enhance their rights under bondage, but the constant bargaining process invariably led to compromises on their part, and the grueling production pace never relented. The only respite from their masters' demands lay in fashioning their own society, including outlets for religion, leisure, and trade. Until recently, scholars have viewed planters as either paternalistic lords who eschewed marketplace values or as entrepreneurs driven to business success. Follett offers a new view of the sugar masters as embracing both the capitalist market and a social ideology based on hierarchy, honor, and paternalism. His stunning synthesis of empirical research, demographics study, and social and cultural history sets a new standard for this subject.
Categories: History

They Were Her Property

They Were Her Property

Clayton, Ronnie W. Mother Wit: The Ex- Slave Narratives of the Louisiana Writers' Project. New York: Peter Lang, 1990. ... The Plantation Mistress: Woman's World in the Old South. ... Craven, Avery O. Rachel of Old Louisiana.

Author: Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300251838

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 517

Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in History A bold and searing investigation into the role of white women in the American slave economy “Compelling.”—Renee Graham, Boston Globe “Stunning.”—Rebecca Onion, Slate “Makes a vital contribution to our understanding of our past and present.”—Parul Sehgal, New York Times Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave‑owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South’s slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave‑owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave‑owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America.
Categories: History

Louisiana History

Louisiana History

5 Avery Craven , Rachel of Old Louisiana ( Baton Rouge , 1975 ) , 8 , 11 , 109. Craven acknowledges that Rachel O'Connor was typical in that Southern women had always assumed temporary management of the plantation in the absence of ...

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ISBN: UVA:X006168259

Category: Louisiana

Page:

View: 756

Categories: Louisiana

Southern Honor

Southern Honor

See Avery O. Craven, Rachel of Old Louisiana (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1975), pp. 22-27; quotation, p. 27. See also John A. Quitman to Col. Brush, August 23, 1823, in J. F. H. Claiborne, Life and Correspondence of ...

Author: Bertram Wyatt-Brown

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199725625

Category: History

Page: 597

View: 424

A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award, hailed in The Washington Post as "a work of enormous imagination and enterprise" and in The New York Times as "an important, original book," Southern Honor revolutionized our understanding of the antebellum South, revealing how Southern men adopted an ancient honor code that shaped their society from top to bottom. Using legal documents, letters, diaries, and newspaper columns, Wyatt-Brown offers fascinating examples to illuminate the dynamics of Southern life throughout the antebellum period. He describes how Southern whites, living chiefly in small, rural, agrarian surroundings, in which everyone knew everyone else, established the local hierarchy of kinfolk and neighbors according to their individual and familial reputation. By claiming honor and dreading shame, they controlled their slaves, ruled their households, established the social rankings of themselves, kinfolk, and neighbors, and responded ferociously against perceived threats. The shamed and shameless sometimes suffered grievously for defying community norms. Wyatt-Brown further explains how a Southern elite refined the ethic. Learning, gentlemanly behavior, and deliberate rather than reckless resort to arms softened the cruder form, which the author calls "primal honor." In either case, honor required men to demonstrate their prowess and engage in fierce defense of individual, family, community, and regional reputation by duel, physical encounter, or war. Subordination of African-Americans was uppermost in this Southern ethic. Any threat, whether from the slaves themselves or from outside agitation, had to be met forcefully. Slavery was the root cause of the Civil War, but, according to Wyatt-Brown, honor pulled the trigger. Featuring a new introduction by the author, this anniversary edition of a classic work offers readers a compelling view of Southern culture before the Civil War.
Categories: History

Women in American Agriculture

Women in American Agriculture

Rachel of Old Louisiana . Rachel of old Louisiana . Baton Rouge , LA : Louisiana State University Press , 1975. 122 pp . Story of widow on an antebellum cotton plantation . Representative of the plight of many such women .

Author: Darla Fera

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89074321563

Category: Farmers' spouses

Page: 30

View: 566

Categories: Farmers' spouses

Fatal Self Deception

Fatal Self Deception

Rachel O'Connor to Mary Moore, Jan. 23, 1826; Nov. 28, 1840, in A. B. W. Webb, ed., Mistress ofEvergreen Plantation: Rachel O'Connor's Legacy ofLetters, 1823–1845 (Albany, N.Y., 1983), 13, 228; Avery O. Craven, Rachel of Old Louisiana ...

Author: Eugene D. Genovese

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139501637

Category: History

Page:

View: 735

Slaveholders were preoccupied with presenting slavery as a benign, paternalistic institution in which the planter took care of his family and slaves were content with their fate. In this book, Eugene D. Genovese and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese discuss how slaveholders perpetuated and rationalized this romanticized version of life on the plantation. Slaveholders' paternalism had little to do with ostensible benevolence, kindness and good cheer. It grew out of the necessity to discipline and morally justify a system of exploitation. At the same time, this book also advocates the examination of masters' relations with white plantation laborers and servants - a largely unstudied subject. Southerners drew on the work of British and European socialists to conclude that all labor, white and black, suffered de facto slavery, and they championed the South's 'Christian slavery' as the most humane and compassionate of social systems, ancient and modern.
Categories: History

Mammon and Manon in Early New Orleans

Mammon and Manon in Early New Orleans

Avery O. Craven , Rachel of Old Louisiana ( 1975 ; reprint , Baton Rouge : Louisiana State Univ . Press , 1995 ) , 106. The statistic on slaves is computed from the inventory on 115–22 . Claiborne to Jefferson , 27 Oct. 1804 , TPQ , 315 ...

Author: Thomas N. Ingersoll

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 1572330244

Category: History

Page: 490

View: 419

"Since Louisiana fell under the administration of France and Spain before becoming a U.S. territory in 1803, the case of New Orleans offers an opportunity to test the long-standing thesis that slave regimes under the French, Spanish, and Anglo-Americans were significantly different. Ingersoll finds that, by contrast, the city's development was remarkably continuous, affected mainly by the changing volume of its slave trade between 1719 and 1808 and thereafter primarily by urban conditions."--Couv.
Categories: History