Public Passion

Rethinking the Grounds for Political Justice

Author: Rebecca Kingston

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 077353878X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 237

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Taking a broad historical perspective, Public Passion traces the role of emotion in political thought from its prominence in classical sources, through its resuscitation by Montesquieu, to the present moment. Combining intellectual history, philosophy, and political theory, Rebecca Kingston develops a sophisticated account of collective emotion that demonstrates how popular sentiment is compatible with debate, pluralism, and individual agency and shows how emotion shapes the tone of interactions among citizens. She also analyzes the ways in which emotions are shared and transmitted among citizens of a particular regime, paying particular attention to the connection between political institutions and the psychological dispositions that they foster. Public Passion presents illuminating new ways to appreciate the forms of popular will and reveals that emotional understanding by citizens may in fact be the very basis through which a commitment to principles of justice can be sustained.
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Public Passions

The Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Popular Sympathy in Republican China

Author: Eugenia Lean

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520932676

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2822

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In 1935, a Chinese woman by the name of Shi Jianqiao murdered the notorious warlord Sun Chuanfang as he prayed in a Buddhist temple. This riveting work of history examines this well-publicized crime and the highly sensationalized trial of the killer. In a fascinating investigation of the media, political, and judicial records surrounding this cause célèbre, Eugenia Lean shows how Shi Jianqiao planned not only to avenge the death of her father, but also to attract media attention and galvanize public support. Lean traces the rise of a new sentiment—"public sympathy"—in early twentieth-century China, a sentiment that ultimately served to exonerate the assassin. The book sheds new light on the political significance of emotions, the powerful influence of sensational media, modern law in China, and the gendered nature of modernity.
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Passion Made Public

Elizabethan Lyric, Gender, and Performance

Author: Diana E. Henderson

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252064609

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 279

View: 7829

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Passion Made Public explores the remarkable vitality of lyrical poetry in Elizabethan theatrical performances, analyzing its complex social and aesthetic origins, uses, and messages. Diana Henderson explains how lyric poetry in plays by Peele, Marlowe, and Shakespeare reflected a range of attitudes toward female power and created an alternative landscape in which to reconsider political and sexual ideologies.
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Taming Passion for the Public Good

Policing Sex in the Early Republic

Author: Mark E. Kann

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764673

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 4608

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“Kann's latest tour de force explores the ambivalence, during the founding of our nation, about whether political freedom should augur sexual freedom. Tracing the roots of patriarchal sexual repression back to revolutionary America, Kann asks highly contemporary questions about the boundaries between public and private life, suggesting, provocatively, that political and sexual freedom should go hand in hand. This is a must-read for those interested in the interwining of politics, public life, and sexuality.”—Ben Agger, University of Texas at Arlington The American Revolution was fought in the name of liberty. In popular imagination, the Revolution stands for the triumph of populism and the death of patriarchal elites. But this is not the case, argues Mark E. Kann. Rather, in the aftermath of the Revolution, America developed a society and system of laws that kept patriarchal authority alive and well—especially when it came to the sex lives of citizens. In Taming Passion for the Public Good, Kann contends that that despite the rhetoric of classical liberalism, the founding generation did not trust ordinary citizens with extensive liberty. Through the policing of sex, elites sought to maintain control of individuals' private lives, ensuring that citizens would be productive, moral, and orderly in the new nation. New American elites applauded traditional marriages in which men were the public face of the family and women managed the home. They frowned on interracial and interclass sexual unions. They saw masturbation as evidence of a lack of self-control over one’s passions, and they considered prostitution the result of aggressive female sexuality. Both were punishable offenses. By seeking to police sex, elites were able to keep alive what Kann calls a “resilient patriarchy.” Under the guise of paternalism, they were able simultaneously to retain social control while espousing liberal principles, with the goal of ultimately molding the country into the new American ideal: a moral and orderly citizenry that voluntarily did what was best for the public good.
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Efficiency, Justice and Care

Philosophical Reflections on Scarcity in Health Care

Author: Yvonne Denier

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402052146

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 1276

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This book attempts to answer the question how health care can be incorporated into a comprehensive theory of justice, while realising an acceptable balance between efficiency, justice and care. It seems to be that we can have any two but not all three. Essentially, the central question addressed by this book is the following: how best to square the proverbial welfare circle.
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The Rational Public

Fifty Years of Trends in Americans' Policy Preferences

Author: Benjamin I. Page,Robert Y. Shapiro

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226644806

Category: Social Science

Page: 506

View: 4918

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This monumental study is a comprehensive critical survey of the policy preferences of the American public, and will be the definitive work on American public opinion for some time to come. Drawing on an enormous body of public opinion data, Benjamin I. Page and Robert Y. Shapiro provide the richest available portrait of the political views of Americans, from the 1930's to 1990. They not only cover all types of domestic and foreign policy issues, but also consider how opinions vary by age, gender, race, region, and the like. The authors unequivocally demonstrate that, notwithstanding fluctuations in the opinions of individuals, collective public opinion is remarkably coherent: it reflects a stable system of values shared by the majority of Americans and it responds sensitively to new events, arguments, and information reported in the mass media. While documenting some alarming case of manipulation, Page and Shapiro solidly establish the soundness and value of collective political opinion. The Rational Public provides a wealth of information about what we as a nation have wanted from government, how we have changed our minds over the years, and why. For anyone interested in the short- and long-term trends in Americans' policy preferences, or eager to learn what Americans have thought about issues ranging from racial equality to the MX missile, welfare to abortion, this book offers by far the most sophisticated and detailed treatment available.
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In the Court of Public Opinion

Winning Strategies for Litigation Communications

Author: James F. Haggerty

Publisher: American Bar Association

ISBN: 9781590319857

Category: Law

Page: 319

View: 9676

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This book is your essential guide to understanding how public relations during lawsuits should be handled with the same seriousness and care as any other aspect of the case. Whether you're a lawyer at an outside law firm, corporate counsel, a publicist, a business executive or a senior communications professional, you need a system for managing communications during litigation, to ensure that you win this critical battle.
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Passion and Power

Sexuality in History

Author: Kathy Lee Peiss,Christina Simmons,Robert A. Padgug

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9780877226376

Category: Psychology

Page: 319

View: 7799

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Passion and Power brings together some of the most recent and innovative writings on the history of sexuality and explores the experiences, ideas, and conflicts that have shaped the emergence of modern sexual identities. Arguing that sexuality is not an unchanging biological reality or a universal natural force, the essays in this volume discuss sexuality as an integral part of the history of human experience. Articles on sexual assault, homosexuality, birth control, venereal disease, sexual repression, pornography, and the AIDS epidemic examine the ways that sexuality has become a core element of modern social identity in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States.It is only in recent years that historians have begun to examine the social construction of sexuality. This is the first anthology that addresses this issue from a radical historical perspective, examining sexuality as a field of contention in itself and as part of other struggles rooted in divisions of gender, class, and race. Author note: Kathy Peiss is Associate Professor of History and Women's Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and author of Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-century New York (Temple). >P>Christina Simmons is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Cincinnati-Raymond Walters College.
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