Populating the Novel

Populating the Novel

Introduction : the biopolitical imagination -- Populating solitude : Malthus, the masses, and the romantic subject -- Political animals : the Victorian city, demography, and the politics of creaturely life -- Dickens's supernumeraries -- ...

Author: Emily Steinlight

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501710728

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 294

View: 146

Introduction : the biopolitical imagination -- Populating solitude : Malthus, the masses, and the romantic subject -- Political animals : the Victorian city, demography, and the politics of creaturely life -- Dickens's supernumeraries -- The sensation novel and the redundant woman questions -- "Because we are too menny
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Recollections of Encolpius

The Recollections of Encolpius

Instead of populating his novel with Greek freedmen, former slaves, and present slaves, Petronius could have used Roman characters. He chose not to. The only literary genre in earlier Roman history to use such a large number of Greek ...

Author: Gottskálk Jensson

Publisher: Barkhuis

ISBN: 9789080739086

Category: History

Page: 327

View: 838

While nineteenth-century scholars debated whether the fragmentary Satyrica of Petronius should be regarded as a traditional or an original work in ancient literary history, twentieth-century Petronian scholarship tended to take for granted that the author was a unique innovator and his work a synthetic composition with respect to genre. The consequence of this was an excessive emphasis on authorial intention as well as a focus on parts of the text taken out of the larger context, which has increased the already severe state of fragmentation in which today's reader finds the Satyrica. The present study offers a reading of the Satyrica as the mimetic performance of its fictional auctor Encolpius; as an ancient road novel told from memory by a Greek exile who relates how on his travels through Italy he had dealings with people who told stories, gave speeches, recited poetry and made other statements, which he then weaves into his own story and retells through the performance technique of vocal impersonation. The result is a skillfully made narrative fabric, a travelogue carried by a desultory narrative voice that switches identity from time to time to deliver discursively varied and often longish statements in the personae of encountered characters.This study also makes a renewed effort to reconstruct the story told in the Satyrica and to explain how it relates to the identity and origin of its fictional auctor, a poor young scholar who volunteered to act the scapegoat in his Greek home city, Massalia (ancient Marseille), and was driven into exile in a bizarre archaic ritual. Besides relating his erotic suffering on account of his love for the beautiful boy Giton, Encolpius intertwines the various discourses and character statements of his narrative into a subtle brand of satire and social criticism (e.g. a critique of ancient capitalism) in the style of Cynic popular philosophy. Finally, it is argued that Petronius' Satyrica is a Roman remake of a lost Greek text of the same title and belongs - together with Apuleius' Metamorphoses - to the oldest type of Greco-Roman novel, known to antiquity as Milesian fiction. Supplementum 2 in Ancient Narrative
Categories: History

The Carver Chronotope

The Carver Chronotope

In “Discourse in the Novel,” Bakhtin refines the ideas cited above from the essay on the bildangsroman: “The social and historical voices populating language... are organized in the novel into a structured stylistic system that ...

Author: G. P. Lainsbury

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415966337

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 193

View: 219

Raymond Carver's fiction is widely known for its careful documentation of lower-middle-class North America in the 1970s and 80s. Building upon the realist understanding of Carver's work, Raymond Carver's Chronotope uses a central concept of Bakhtin's novelistics to formulate a new context for understanding the celebrated author's minimalist fiction. G. P. Lainsbury describes the critical reception of Carver's work and stakes out his own intellectual and imaginative territory by arguing that Carver's fiction can be understood as diffuse, fragmentary, and randomly ordered. Offering a fresh analysis of Carver's body of work, this book offers an extensive meditation on this major figure in postmodern U.S. fiction.
Categories: Literary Collections

The Sentimental Education of the Novel

The Sentimental Education of the Novel

By materialism, novels designate a society where individuals pursue self-interest and where all social relations turn ... self-centered husband in La Duchesse de Valombray are only three of the “selfish people” populating these novels.

Author: Margaret Cohen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691188249

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 467

The nineteenth-century French novel has long been seen as the heroic production of great men, who confronted in their works the social consequences of the French Revolution. And it is true that French realism, especially as developed by Balzac and Stendhal, was one of the most influential novelistic forms ever invented. Margaret Cohen, however, challenges the traditional account of the genesis of realism by returning Balzac and Stendhal to the forgotten novelistic contexts of their time. Reconstructing a key formative period for the novel, she shows how realist codes emerged in a "hostile take-over" of a prestigious contemporary sentimental practice of the novel, which was almost completely dominated by women writers. Cohen draws on impressive archival research, resurrecting scores of forgotten nineteenth-century novels, to demonstrate that the codes most closely identified with realism were actually the invention of sentimentality, a powerful aesthetic of emerging liberal-democratic society, although Balzac and Stendhal trivialized sentimental works by associating them with "frivolous" women writers and readers. Attention to these gendered struggles over genre explains why women were not pioneers of realism in France during the nineteenth century, a situation that contrasts with England, where women writers played a formative role in inventing the modern realist novel. Cohen argues that to understand how literary codes respond to material factors, it is imperative to see how such factors take shape within the literary field as well as within society as a whole. The book also proposes that attention to literature as a social institution will help critics resolve the current, vital question of how to practice literary history in the wake of poststructuralism.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading with the Senses in Victorian Literature and Science

Reading with the Senses in Victorian Literature and Science

Chapter 2 focuses on the historical figures populating Romola (1862–63), George Eliot's historical novel set in Renaissance-era Florence. Reading Romola alongside the epistemological debates generated by mid-nineteenth-century optics, ...

Author: David Sweeney Coombs

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813943435

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 480

The nineteenth-century sciences cleaved sensory experience into two separate realms: the bodily physics of sensation and the mental activity of perception. This division into two discrete categories was foundational to Victorian physics, physiology, and experimental psychology. As David Sweeney Coombs reveals, however, it was equally important to Victorian novelists, aesthetes, and critics, for whom the distinction between sensation and perception promised the key to understanding literature’s seemingly magical power to conjure up tastes, sights, touches, and sounds from the austere medium of print. In Victorian literature, science, and philosophy, the parallel between reading and perceiving gave rise to momentous debates about description as a mode of knowledge as well as how, and even whether, reading about the world differs from experiencing it firsthand. Examining novels and art criticism by George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, Vernon Lee, and Walter Pater alongside scientific works by Hermann von Helmholtz, William James, and others, this book shows how Victorian literature offers us ways not just to touch but to grapple with the material realities that Clifford Geertz called the "hard surfaces of life."
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Holocaust Writing

Women s Holocaust Writing

8 Populating the novel is a large array of civilians , in the contexts of internment and concentration camps , resistance and intelligence units , and professional or rescue missions at some distance from the war scene .

Author: S. Lillian Kremer

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803278004

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 278

View: 146

Women's Holocaust Writing, the first book of literary criticism devoted to American Holocaust writing by and about women, extends Holocaust and literary studies by examining women's artistic representations of female Holocaust experiences. Beyond racial persecution, women suffered gender-related oppression and coped with the concentration camp universe in ways consistent with their prewar gender socialization. Through close, insightful reading of fiction S. Lillian Kremer explores Holocaust representations in works distinguished by the power of their literary expression and attention to women's diverse experiences.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Art Death and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

Art  Death and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

Many of the other sentences populating the novel's several hundred pages too are syntactically correct but largely devoid of sense, compressed onto (and into) the rim of the false hole formed by the opening and closing syntagms and ...

Author: Efrat Biberman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351698535

Category: Art

Page: 156

View: 216

Art, Death and Lacanian Psychoanalysis examines the relationship between art and death from the perspective of Lacanian psychoanalysis. It takes a unique approach to the topic by making explicit reference to the death drive as manifest in theories of art and in artworks. Freud’s treatment of death focuses not on the moment of biological extinction but on the recurrent moments in life which he called "the death drive" or the "compulsion to repeat": the return precisely of what is most unbearable for the subject. Surprisingly, in some of its manifestations, this painful repetition turns out to be invigorating. It is this invigorating repetition that is the main concern of this book, which demonstrates the presence of its manifestations in painting and literature and in the theoretical discourse concerning them from the dawn of Western culture to the present. After unfolding the psychoanalytical and philosophical underpinnings for the return of the death drive as invigorating repetition in the sphere of the arts, the authors examine various aspects of this repetition through the works of Gerhard Richter, Jeff Wall, and contemporary Israeli artists Deganit Berest and Yitzhak Livneh, as well as through the writings of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce. First to articulate the stimulating aspect of the death drive in its relation to the arts and the conception of art as a varied repetition beyond a limit, Art, Death and Lacanian Psychoanalysis will be indispensable to psychoanalysts, scholars of art theory and aesthetics and those studying at the intersection of art and psychoanalysis.
Categories: Art

Benedikte Naubert 1756 1819 and Her Relations to English Culture

Benedikte Naubert  1756 1819  and Her Relations to English Culture

The motif of adventure may be a residue of the courtly Baroque novel, for example (cf. pp. ... Of course, the novel could also be a translation from the French. ... For instance, in populating eighteenth-century Austria with vicars, ...

Author: Hilary Brown

Publisher: MHRA

ISBN: 9781904350422

Category: History

Page: 161

View: 400

The eighteenth century saw the first significant phase of cultural interchange between Britain and Germany. This study examines the part played in this process by women writers, who were entering the literary world in large numbers for the first time. It asks whether women - as readers, translators, and authors - were particularly receptive to the work of other women, and whether a cross-cultural female literary tradition emerged during the period. The study offers a detailed case-study of the German writer Benedikte Naubert, now known for her collection of fairy-tales but also a prolific novelist. It looks first at Naubert's engagement with English literature, that is to say at her numerous translations of English novels, and at the ways in which Anglophilia influenced the production of her own fiction. It establishes how Naubert's interest in England and English literature was related to her position as a woman writer. It then examines the reception of her novels and stories in Britain, questioning how far the response to her texts can be linked to issues of gender. Naubert's work is compared throughout to that of other women writers, and the study thus sheds new light on the extent to which cross-cultural interchange influenced the development of women's writing in both countries.
Categories: History

Unsettled Remains

Unsettled Remains

... as Jennifer Andrews demonstrates in her essay in this collection, by overturning conventional associations of Native people with gothic “savagery” and populating her novel with spirits and monsters that guide her protagonist.

Author: Cynthia Sugars

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9781554588008

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 324

View: 965

Unsettled Remains: Canadian Literature and the Postcolonial Gothic examines how Canadian writers have combined a postcolonial awareness with gothic metaphors of monstrosity and haunting in their response to Canadian history. The essays gathered here range from treatments of early postcolonial gothic expression in Canadian literature to attempts to define a Canadian postcolonial gothic mode. Many of these texts wrestle with Canada’s colonial past and with the voices and histories that were repressed in the push for national consolidation but emerge now as uncanny reminders of that contentious history. The haunting effect can be unsettling and enabling at the same time. In recent years, many Canadian authors have turned to the gothic to challenge dominant literary, political, and social narratives. In Canadian literature, the “postcolonial gothic” has been put to multiple uses, above all to figure experiences of ambivalence that have emerged from a colonial context and persisted into the present. As these essays demonstrate, formulations of a Canadian postcolonial gothic differ radically from one another, depending on the social and cultural positioning of who is positing it. Given the preponderance, in colonial discourse, of accounts that demonize otherness, it is not surprising that many minority writers have avoided gothic metaphors. In recent years, however, minority authors have shown an interest in the gothic, signalling an emerging critical discourse. This “spectral turn” sees minority writers reversing long-standing characterizations of their identity as “monstrous” or invisible in order to show their connections to and disconnection from stories of the nation.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Verbal Visual Configurations in Postcolonial Literature

Verbal Visual Configurations in Postcolonial Literature

pronounced in her second novel Half of a Yellow Sun, published in 2006 and awarded the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction.1 The ... the “[p]eople” populating the fictional universe “starve and die in the refugee camp where the novel's final ...

Author: Birgit Neumann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000060508

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 282

View: 333

Examining a range of contemporary Anglophone texts, this book opens up postcolonial and transcultural studies for discussions of visuality and vision. It argues that the preoccupation with visual practices in Anglophone literatures addresses the power of images, vision and visual aesthetics to regulate cultural visibility and modes of identification in an unevenly structured world. The representation of visual practices in the imaginative realm of fiction opens up a zone in which established orders of the sayable and visible may be revised and transformed. In 12 chapters, the book examines narrative fiction by writers such as Michael Ondaatje, Derek Walcott, Salman Rushdie, David Dabydeen and NoViolet Bulawayo, who employ word-image relations to explore the historically fraught links between visual practices and the experience of modernity in a transcultural context. Against this conceptual background, the examination of verbal-visual relations will illustrate how Anglophone fiction models alternative modes of re-presentation that reflect critically on hegemonic visual regimes and reach out for new, more pluralized forms of exchange.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature

The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature

... of the novel's eponymous household , consisting of the matriarch Sophia Grieve Ryder , her irresponsible son Wendell , dedicated to populating the planet , his wife Amelia de Grier , his mistress KateCareless , and their children .

Author: Steven R. Serafin

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 0826417779

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1305

View: 392

More than ten years in the making, this comprehensive single-volume literary survey is for the student, scholar, and general reader. The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature represents a collaborative effort, involving 300 contributors from across the US and Canada. Composed of more than 1,100 signed biographical-critical entries, this Encyclopedia serves as both guide and companion to the study and appreciation of American literature. A special feature is the topical article, of which there are 70.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Communities of Care

Communities of Care

Populating the Novel: Literary Form and the Politics of Surplus Life. Cornell University Press, 2018 Stephen, Julia. On Being Ill; with Notes from Sick Rooms [1885]. Wesleyan University Press, 2012. Stern, Kimberly J. The Social Life of ...

Author: Talia Schaffer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691226514

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 502

What we can learn about caregiving and community from the Victorian novel In Communities of Care, Talia Schaffer explores Victorian fictional representations of care communities, small voluntary groups that coalesce around someone in need. Drawing lessons from Victorian sociality, Schaffer proposes a theory of communal care and a mode of critical reading centered on an ethics of care. In the Victorian era, medical science offered little hope for cure of illness or disability, and chronic invalidism and lengthy convalescences were common. Small communities might gather around afflicted individuals to minister to their needs and palliate their suffering. Communities of Care examines these groups in the novels of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Henry James, and Charlotte Yonge, and studies the relationships that they exemplify. How do carers become part of the community? How do they negotiate status? How do caring emotions develop? And what does it mean to think of care as an activity rather than a feeling? Contrasting the Victorian emphasis on community and social structure with modern individualism and interiority, Schaffer’s sympathetic readings draw us closer to the worldview from which these novels emerged. Schaffer also considers the ways in which these models of carework could inform and improve practice in criticism, in teaching, and in our daily lives. Through the lens of care, Schaffer discovers a vital form of communal relationship in the Victorian novel. Communities of Care also demonstrates that literary criticism done well is the best care that scholars can give to texts.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Intelligent Virtual Agents

Intelligent Virtual Agents

Populating Reconstructed Archaeological Sites with Autonomous Virtual Humans Wei Shao1 and Demetri Terzopoulos2 1 Media Research Lab, New York University, ... We also describe an extension of our system and present its novel ...

Author: Jonathan Gratch

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783540375937

Category: Computers

Page: 472

View: 419

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Intelligent Virtual Agents, IVA 2006. The book presents 24 revised full papers and 11 revised short papers together with 3 invited talks and the abstracts of 19 poster papers. The papers are organized in topical sections on social impact of IVAs, IVAs recognizing human behavior, human interpretation of IVA behavior, embodied conversational agents, characteristics of nonverbal behavior and more.
Categories: Computers

Such a Dark Thing

Such a Dark Thing

... David Sosnowski's equally wonderful novel Vamped and the sub-genre busting Spierig Brothers film daybreakers, ... and populating the pages with intelligent, determined, and tough-as-nails survivors struggling to maintain their faith ...

Author: M. Jess Peacock

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781620327197

Category: Religion

Page: 168

View: 992

Evil, death, demons, reanimation, and resurrection. While such topics are often reserved for the darker mindscapes of the vampire subgenre within popular culture, they are equally integral elements of religious history and belief. Despite the cultural shift of presenting vampires in a secular light, the traditional figure of the vampire within cinema and literature has a rich legacy of serving as a theological marker. Whether as a symbol of the allure of sin, as an apologetic for assorted religious icons, or as a gateway into a discussion of liberationist theology, the vampire has served as a spiritual touchstone from Bram Stoker's Dracula, to Stephen King's Salem's Lot, to the HBO television series True Blood. In Such a Dark Thing, Jess Peacock examines how the figure of the vampire is able to traverse and interconnect theology and academia within the larger popular culture in a compelling and engaging manner. The vampire straddles the ineffable chasm between life and death and speaks to the transcendent in all of us, tapping into our fundamental curiosity of what, if anything, exists beyond the mortal coil, giving us a glimpse into the interminable while maintaining a cultural currency that is never dead and buried.
Categories: Religion

A Concise Companion to the Restoration and Eighteenth Century

A Concise Companion to the Restoration and Eighteenth Century

Taught to value the early novel for the nascent “realism” that will give readers an insider's view of the depths of ... In fact, “individual” remains critics' term of choice for the people populating those fictions they call novels.

Author: Cynthia Wall

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470757499

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 853

This Concise Companion presents fresh perspectives on eighteenth-century literature. Contributes to current debates in the field on subjects such as the public sphere, travel and exploration, scientific rhetoric, gender and the book trade, and historical versus literary perceptions of life on London streets. Searches out connections between the remarkable number of new genres that appeared in the eighteenth century. Crosses conventional disciplinary lines. Demonstrates that philosophy, history, politics and social theory both influence and are influenced by literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The New Man Masculinity and Marriage in the Victorian Novel

The New Man  Masculinity and Marriage in the Victorian Novel

4 Mary's innocent question, in addition to exposing the Victorian sexual double standard, encourages a comparison between Dickens's Steerforth and the 'fallen' male characters populating Dixon's novel.

Author: Tara MacDonald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317317791

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 934

By tracing the rise of the New Man alongside novelistic changes in the representations of marriage, MacDonald shows how this figure encouraged Victorian writers to reassess masculine behaviour and to re-imagine the marriage plot in light of wider social changes. She finds examples in novels by Dickens, Anne Brontë, George Eliot and George Gissing.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Science of Character

The Science of Character

Attention to the role of color in both Hardy's novel and hereditary discourse of the period reveals how the conceptualization of this new biological unit entailed ... in Jude the Obscure, see Steinlight, Populating the Novel, chap. 5.

Author: S. Pearl Brilmyer

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226815794

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 510

The Science of Character makes a bold new claim for the power of the literary by showing how Victorian novelists used fiction to theorize how character forms. In 1843, the Victorian philosopher John Stuart Mill called for the establishment of a new science, “the science of the formation of character.” Although Mill’s proposal failed as scientific practice, S. Pearl Brilmyer maintains that it found its true home in realist fiction of the period, which employed the literary figure of character to investigate the nature of embodied experience. Bringing to life Mill’s unrealized dream of a science of character, novelists such as George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Olive Schreiner turned to narrative to explore how traits and behaviors in organisms emerge and develop, and how aesthetic features—shapes, colors, and gestures—come to take on cultural meaning through certain categories, such as race and sex. Engaged with materialist science and philosophy, these authors transformed character from the liberal notion of the inner truth of an individual into a materially determined figuration produced through shifts in the boundaries between the body’s inside and outside. In their hands, Brilmyer argues, literature became a science, not in the sense that its claims were falsifiable or even systematically articulated, but in its commitment to uncovering, through a fictional staging of realistic events, the laws governing physical and affective life. The Science of Character redraws late Victorian literary history to show how women and feminist novelists pushed realism to its aesthetic and philosophical limits in the crucial span between 1870 and 1920.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Encyclopedia of the Novel

Encyclopedia of the Novel

populating his own personal sky. Oe's increasing concern with metafictional modes, including a fascination with language itself, comes to the fore in his extraordinary 1972 novella Waga namida o nuguitamu hi (The Day He Himself Shall ...

Author: Paul Schellinger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135918262

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 838

View: 867

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Hating God

Hating God

To begin with, the novel carries distinctly anti-Christian overtones. The most despicable of all unpleasant characters populating this novel, the aptly named Miss Kilman, is also the only self-declared Christian of the book.

Author: Bernard Schweizer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199781348

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 269

While atheists such as Richard Dawkins have now become public figures, there is another and perhaps darker strain of religious rebellion that has remained out of sight--people who hate God. In this revealing book, Bernard Schweizer looks at men and women who do not question God's existence, but deny that He is merciful, competent, or good. Sifting through a wide range of literary and historical works, Schweizer finds that people hate God for a variety of reasons. Some are motivated by social injustice, human suffering, or natural catastrophes that God does not prevent. Some blame God for their personal tragedies. Schweizer concludes that, despite their blasphemous thoughts, these people tend to be creative and moral individuals, and include such literary lights as Friedrich Nietzsche, Mark Twain, Zora Neale Hurston, Rebecca West, Elie Wiesel, and Philip Pullman. Schweizer shows that literature is a fertile ground for God haters. Many authors, who dare not voice their negative attitude to God openly, turn to fiction to give vent to it. Indeed, Schweizer provides many new and startling readings of literary masterpieces, highlighting the undercurrent of hatred for God. Moreover, by probing the deeper mainsprings that cause sensible, rational, and moral beings to turn against God, Schweizer offers answers to some of the most vexing questions that beset human relationships with the divine.
Categories: Religion

Ramifications

Ramifications

John Powers, NPR 'Daniel Saldaña París knows how to talk about those other tragedies populating daily life (...).' Yuri Herrera 'With this novel Daniel Saldaña París affirms himself as one of the most exceptional authors of his ...

Author: Daniel Saldaña París

Publisher: Charco Press

ISBN: 9781916277830

Category: Fiction

Page: 197

View: 512

The memories we return to most frequently are the most inaccurate, the least faithful to reality... This is the tragic realisation made by the narrator of _Ramifications _as he tries to make sense of the defining event of his childhood: the disappearance of his mother to join the Zapatista uprising that shook Mexico in 1994. Left behind with an emotionally distant father who is singularly unqualified to raise him, and an older sister who only wants to get on with being a teenager, he takes refuge in strange rituals that isolate him from his peers: favouring the left-hand side of his body, trying to tear leaves into perfect halves, obsessively shaping origami figures. Now, two decades older and withdrawn from the world, he folds and unfolds these memories, searching the creases for the truth of what happened to his mother, unaware that he is on the verge of a discovery that will destroy everything he believed he knew about his family.Award-winning Mexican author Daniel Saldaña París masterfully evokes a child’s attempts to interpret events beyond his understanding. Less a Bildungs-roman than a tale of arrested development, this story of a boy growing up in the aptly-named Educación neighbourhood of Mexico City is a rich and moving portrait of a life thwarted by machismo and secrecy.
Categories: Fiction