The Politics of Resentment

The Politics of Resentment

With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the “liberal elite.” Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the ...

Author: Katherine J. Cramer

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226349251

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 418

Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government in the wake of the Great Recession. In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. How could this happen? How is it that the very people who stand to benefit from strong government services not only vote against the candidates who support those services but are vehemently against the very idea of big government? With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the “liberal elite.” Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the distinct values of their communities and allocate a fair share of resources. What can look like disagreements about basic political principles are therefore actually rooted in something even more fundamental: who we are as people and how closely a candidate’s social identity matches our own. Using Scott Walker and Wisconsin’s prominent and protracted debate about the appropriate role of government, Cramer illuminates the contours of rural consciousness, showing how place-based identities profoundly influence how people understand politics, regardless of whether urban politicians and their supporters really do shortchange or look down on those living in the country. The Politics of Resentment shows that rural resentment—no less than partisanship, race, or class—plays a major role in dividing America against itself.
Categories: Political Science

The Politics of Resentment

The Politics of Resentment

But that does not mean that fruitful conversations should not continue. In The Politics of Resentment, Jeremy Engels picks up this thread, examining the costs of violent political rhetoric for our society and the future of democracy.

Author: Jeremy Engels

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271071985

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 776

In the days and weeks following the tragic 2011 shooting of nineteen Arizonans, including congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, there were a number of public discussions about the role that rhetoric might have played in this horrific event. In question was the use of violent and hateful rhetoric that has come to dominate American political discourse on television, on the radio, and at the podium. A number of more recent school shootings have given this debate a renewed sense of urgency, as have the continued use of violent metaphors in public address and the dishonorable state of America’s partisan gridlock. This conversation, unfortunately, has been complicated by a collective cultural numbness to violence. But that does not mean that fruitful conversations should not continue. In The Politics of Resentment, Jeremy Engels picks up this thread, examining the costs of violent political rhetoric for our society and the future of democracy. The Politics of Resentment traces the rise of especially violent rhetoric in American public discourse by investigating key events in American history. Engels analyzes how resentful rhetoric has long been used by public figures in order to achieve political ends. He goes on to show how a more devastating form of resentment started in the 1960s, dividing Americans on issues of structural inequalities and foreign policy. He discusses, for example, the rhetorical and political contexts that have made the mobilization of groups such as Nixon’s “silent majority” and the present Tea Party possible. Now, in an age of recession and sequestration, many Americans believe that they have been given a raw deal and experience feelings of injustice in reaction to events beyond individual control. With The Politics of Resentment, Engels wants to make these feelings of victimhood politically productive by challenging the toxic rhetoric that takes us there, by defusing it, and by enabling citizens to have the kinds of conversations we need to have in order to fight for life, liberty, and equality.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Politics and Resentment

Politics and Resentment

... and the mobilization of political resentments in general—and counter-cosmopolitanism and antisemitism in particular. Which independent variables, generalizable factors and contributing conditions can be isolated and controlled?

Author: Lars Rensmann

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004190474

Category: Religion

Page: 516

View: 395

Democratic polities continue to be faced with politics of resentment. The first comparative study of its kind, this book rigorously examines the contemporary relevance of antisemitism and counter-cosmopolitan resentments in the European Union and beyond.
Categories: Religion

The Politics Of Resentment

The Politics Of Resentment

How could a social stratum, once aligned with the left, end up at the opposite end of the political spectrum? This was the set of problems which The Politics of Resentment took on, and it did so through close analysis of a particular ...

Author:

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781412838436

Category: Political Science

Page: 539

View: 900

The establishment of the Third Republic in France in the 1870s swept the nobility from power and established republican government supported by the professional classes, the peasantry, and small businessmen. Paris shopkeepers at first allied themselves with this new republican order but then broke away from it, claiming it favored the rise of large department stores that threatened their livelihood. This work offers a broader interpretation of their protests within the context of general social and cultural developments, providing a colorful and convincing description and analysis of Parisian politics in this critical era of French history. Historians' previous explanations of shopkeeper discontent during the period have centered on the rise of the department store. In contrast, Nord shifts the locus of interpretation to the impact of Baron Haussmann's rebuilding of Paris and the economic crisis of the 1880s on the Paris retail market. In addition, the author challenges the assumption that retailers' protest translates directly into a politics of reaction. His interpretation is an example of social history at its best, and will appeal to those interested in France, social movements, and nineteenth-century Europe. Available for the first time in paperback, this edition includes a new introduction by the author that discusses the book's themes--politics of consumption, nationalism, anti-Semitism--in terms of current historiographical concerns. He also examines whether our own era is not one of political realignment with a potential for right-wing extremism.
Categories: Political Science

The Return of Resentment

The Return of Resentment

In The Return of Resentment, Robert A. Schneider explores these questions and more, moving from eighteenth-century Britain to the aftermath of the French Revolution to social movements throughout the twentieth century.

Author: Robert A. Schneider

Publisher:

ISBN: 022658643X

Category:

Page: 288

View: 728

Categories:

Identity

Identity

The New York Times bestselling author of The Origins of Political Order offers a provocative examination of modern identity politics: its origins, its effects, and what it means for domestic and international affairs of state In 2014, ...

Author: Francis Fukuyama

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9780374717483

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 623

The New York Times bestselling author of The Origins of Political Order offers a provocative examination of modern identity politics: its origins, its effects, and what it means for domestic and international affairs of state In 2014, Francis Fukuyama wrote that American institutions were in decay, as the state was progressively captured by powerful interest groups. Two years later, his predictions were borne out by the rise to power of a series of political outsiders whose economic nationalism and authoritarian tendencies threatened to destabilize the entire international order. These populist nationalists seek direct charismatic connection to “the people,” who are usually defined in narrow identity terms that offer an irresistible call to an in-group and exclude large parts of the population as a whole. Demand for recognition of one’s identity is a master concept that unifies much of what is going on in world politics today. The universal recognition on which liberal democracy is based has been increasingly challenged by narrower forms of recognition based on nation, religion, sect, race, ethnicity, or gender, which have resulted in anti-immigrant populism, the upsurge of politicized Islam, the fractious “identity liberalism” of college campuses, and the emergence of white nationalism. Populist nationalism, said to be rooted in economic motivation, actually springs from the demand for recognition and therefore cannot simply be satisfied by economic means. The demand for identity cannot be transcended; we must begin to shape identity in a way that supports rather than undermines democracy. Identity is an urgent and necessary book—a sharp warning that unless we forge a universal understanding of human dignity, we will doom ourselves to continuing conflict.
Categories: Political Science

Thunder on the Right

Thunder on the Right

Drawing from his own experiences as a conservative, Crawford shows that the New Right is, in reality, anticonservative and reveals its damaging effect on the conservative cause

Author: Alan Pell Crawford

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: UOM:39015005192870

Category: Political Science

Page: 381

View: 982

Drawing from his own experiences as a conservative, Crawford shows that the New Right is, in reality, anticonservative and reveals its damaging effect on the conservative cause
Categories: Political Science

Nation Class and Resentment

Nation  Class and Resentment

This timely book provides an extensive account of national identities in three of the constituent nations of the United Kingdom: Wales, Scotland and England.

Author: Robin Mann

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137466747

Category: Social Science

Page: 249

View: 324

This timely book provides an extensive account of national identities in three of the constituent nations of the United Kingdom: Wales, Scotland and England. In all three contexts, identity and nationalism have become questions of acute interest in both academic and political commentary. The authors take stock of a wealth of empirical material and explore how attitudes to nation and state can be understood by relating them to changes in contemporary capitalist economies, and the consequences for particular class fractions. The book argues that these changes give rise to a set of resentments among people who perceive themselves to be losing out, concluding that class resentments, depending on historical and political factors relevant to each nation, can take the form of either sub-state nationalism or right wing populism. Nation, Class and Resentment shows that the politics of resentment is especially salient in England, where the promotion of a distinct national identity is problematic. Students and scholars across a range of disciplines, including sociology and politics, will find this study of interest.
Categories: Social Science

The Politics of Resentment

The Politics of Resentment

Philip Resnick explores what makes British Columbia stand apart as a region of Canada and looks at the views of politicians, opinion-makers and ordinary citizens on various issues.

Author: Philip Resnick

Publisher: IRPP

ISBN: 0774808047

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 278

The Politics of Resentment is the first book to examine the role that British Columbia has played in the evolving Canadian unity debate. Philip Resnick explores what makes British Columbia stand apart as a region of Canada. He looks at the views of politicians, opinionmakers, and ordinary British Columbians on their sense of estrangement from central Canada, on the challenges posed by Quebec nationalism, and on what they see as the future of Canadian unity. He concludes with an examination of the likely BC response in the event of a "yes" vote in any future Quebec referendum on sovereignty.
Categories: History