Jewish Religious Life in Poland Since 1750

Jewish Religious Life in Poland Since 1750

Collectively, these essays offer a different perspective. The volume has five sections.

Author: Francois Guesnet

Publisher:

ISBN: 1906764751

Category:

Page: 500

View: 580

Following tremendous advances in recent years in the study of religious belief, this volume adopts a fresh understanding of Jewish religious life in Poland. Approaches deriving from the anthropology,history, phenomenology, psychology, and sociology of religion have replaced the methodologies of social or political history that were applied in the past, offering fascinating new perspectives. The well-established interest in hasidism continues, albeit from new angles, but topics that have barely been considered before are well represented here too. Women's religious practice gains new prominence, and a focus on elites has given way to a consideration of the beliefs and practices of ordinary people. Reappraisals of religious responses to secularization and modernity, both liberal and Orthodox, offer more nuanced insights into this key issue. Other research areas representedhere include the material history of Jewish religious life in eastern Europeand the shift of emphasis from theology to praxis in the search for thedefining quality of religious experience. The contemporary reassessments in this volume, with their awareness of emerging techniques that have the potential to extract fresh insights from source materials both old and new, show how our understanding of what it means to be Jewish is continuing to expand.
Categories:

American Warsaw

American Warsaw

Ewa Morawska, “Polish- Jewish Relations in America, 1880–1940: Old Elements, New Configurations,” in Polish Jewish ... Mieczysław B. Biskupski and Antony Polonsky, Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. 19 (Oxford, 2007), 73–77. 33.

Author: Dominic A. Pacyga

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226406756

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 955

A comprehensive and engaging history of a century of Polish immigration and influence in Chicago. Every May, a sea of 250,000 people decked out in red and white head to Chicago’s Loop to celebrate the Polish Constitution Day Parade. In the city, you can tune in to not one but four different Polish-language radio stations or jam out to the Polkaholics. You can have lunch at pierogi food trucks or pick up pączkis at the grocery store. And if you’re lucky, you get to take off work for Casimir Pulaski Day. For more than a century, Chicago has been home to one of the largest Polish populations outside of Poland, and the group has had an enormous influence on the city’s culture and politics. Yet, until now, there has not been a comprehensive history of the Chicago Polonia. With American Warsaw, award-winning historian and Polish American Dominic A. Pacyga chronicles more than a century of immigration, and later emigration back to Poland, showing how the community has continually redefined what it means to be Polish in Chicago. He takes us from the Civil War era until today, focusing on how three major waves of immigrants, refugees, and fortune seekers shaped and then redefined the Polonia. Pacyga also traces the movement of Polish immigrants from the peasantry to the middle class and from urban working-class districts dominated by major industries to suburbia. He documents Polish Chicago’s alignments and divisions: with other Chicago ethnic groups; with the Catholic Church; with unions, politicians, and city hall; and even among its own members. And he explores the ever-shifting sense of Polskość, or “Polishness.” Today Chicago is slowly being eclipsed by other Polish immigrant centers, but it remains a vibrant—and sometimes contentious—heart of the Polish American experience. American Warsaw is a sweeping story that expertly depicts a people who are deeply connected to their historical home and, at the same time, fiercely proud of their adopted city. As Pacyga writes, “While we were Americans, we also considered ourselves to be Poles. In that strange Chicago ethnic way, there was no real difference between the two.”
Categories: History

All Religion Is Inter Religion

All Religion Is Inter Religion

43, 51; and Yaakov Mazor, “The Badkhn in Contemporary Hasidic Society: Social, Historical, and Musical Observations,” Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry 16 (2003). 33 See Oytseres hanigunim, vol. 1 (Jerusalem: 5764 [2003–2004]), 151.

Author: Kambiz GhaneaBassiri

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350062221

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 450

All Religion Is Inter-Religion analyses the ways inter-religious relations have contributed both historically and philosophically to the constructions of the category of “religion” as a distinct subject of study. Regarded as contemporary classics, Steven M. Wasserstrom's Religion after Religion (1999) and Between Muslim and Jew (1995) provided a theoretical reorientation for the study of religion away from hierophanies and ultimacy, and toward lived history and deep pluralism. This book distills and systematizes this reorientation into nine theses on the study of religion. Drawing on these theses--and Wasserstrom's opus more generally--a distinguished group of his colleagues and former students demonstrate that religions can, and must, be understood through encounters in real time and space, through the complex relations they create and maintain between people, and between people and their pasts. The book also features an afterword by Wasserstrom himself, which poses nine riddles to students of religion based on his personal experiences working on religion at the turn of the twenty-first century.
Categories: Religion

A Romantic Century in Polish Music

A Romantic Century in Polish Music

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry vol. 19 (2007), “Polish-Jewish Relations in North America,” Anthony Polonsky and Mieczysław Biskupski, ed. 33 See Magdalena Dziadek's two chapters in the present volume, “Polish Reception of Wagner's Music ...

Author: Maja Trochimczyk

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9780981969336

Category: Music

Page: 248

View: 948

Categories: Music

Nazi Germany And the Jews The Years Of Extermination

Nazi Germany And the Jews  The Years Of Extermination

Alexander B. Rossino, “Polish 'Neighbors' and German Invaders: Anti-Jewish Violence in the Bialystok District during the Opening Weeks of Operation Barbarossa,” Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry 16 (2003), pp. 441–42. 158.

Author: Saul Friedlander

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781780227573

Category: History

Page: 896

View: 626

The second and concluding volume of the definitive two-volume account of the Holocaust With THE YEARS OF EXTERMINATION, Friedlander completes his work on Nazi Germany and the Jews. The book describes and interprets the history of the persecution and murder of the Jews throughout occupied Europe. The implementation of German extermination policies and measures depended on the submissiveness of political authorities, the assistance of local police forces and the passivity or co-operation of the populations, primarily of their political and spiritual elites. The implementation also depended on the readiness of the victimes to submit to orders, often with the hope of modifying them or surviving long enough to escape the German vice. This multifaceted representation - at all levels and in all different places - enhances the perception of the magnitude, complexity and interrelatedness of the multiple components of this history. Based on a vast variety of documents and an overwhelming choir of voices, Friedlander manages to avoid domesticating the memory of unparalleled and horrific events. The convergence of these various aspects gives THE YEARS OF EXTERMINATION its unique aulity. In this work the history of the Holocaust has found its definitive representation.
Categories: History

Capitalism s Hidden Worlds

Capitalism s Hidden Worlds

... Building 2 [hereafter abbreviated as GARF-1 (Building 1 of the Archive) or GARF-2 (Building 2)]. 5. Ibid., vol. 3, 6. 6. Ibid., 33. 7. Gennady Estraikh, “The Soviet Shtetl in the 1920's,” Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry 17 (2004): ...

Author: Kenneth Lipartito

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812251814

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 215

Observers see free markets, the relentless pursuit of profit, and the unremitting drive to commodify everything as capitalism's defining characteristics. These most visible economic features, however, obscure a range of other less evident, often unmeasured activities that occur on the margins and in the concealed corners of the formal economy. The range of practices in this large and diverse hidden realm encompasses traders in recycled materials and the architects of junk bonds and shadow banking. It includes the black and semi-licit markets that allow wealthy elites to avoid taxes and the unmeasured domestic and emotional labor of homemakers and home care workers. By some estimates, the unmeasured economic activity that occurs within the household, informal market, and underground economy amounts to a substantial portion of all economic activity in the world, as much as 30 percent in some countries. Capitalism's Hidden Worlds sheds new light on this shadowy economic landscape by reexamining how we think about the market. In particular, it scrutinizes the missed connections between the official, visible realm of exchange and the uncounted and invisible sectors that border it. While some hidden markets emerged in opposition to the formal economy, much of the obscured economy described in this volume operates as the other side of the legitimate, state-sanctioned marketplace. A variety of historical actors—from fortune tellers and forgers to tax lawyers and black market consumers—have constructed this unseen world in tandem with the observable public world of transactions. Others, such as feminist development economists and government regulators, have worked to bring the darkened corners of the economy to light. The essays in Capitalism's Hidden Worlds explore how the capitalist marketplace sustains itself, how it acquires legitimacy and even prestige, and how the marginalized and the dispossessed find ways to make ends meet. Contributors: Bruce Baker, Eileen Boris, Eli Cook, Hannah Frydman, James Hollis, Owen Hyman, Anna Kushkova, Christopher McKenna, Kenneth Mouré, Philip Scranton, Bryan Turo.
Categories: History

From Maimonides to Microsoft

From Maimonides to Microsoft

In Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Focusing on Galicia, eds. Israel Bartal and Antony ... In German-Jewish History in Modern Times: Volume 2 Emancipation and Acculturation, 1780–1871, ed. ... Jewish Social Studies 33:87–119. ——— . 2004.

Author: Neil Weinstock Netanel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199707331

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 766

Jewish copyright law is a rich body of jurisprudence that developed in parallel with modern copyright laws and the book privileges that preceded them. Jewish copyright law owes its origins to a reprinting ban that the Rome rabbinic court issued for three books of Hebrew grammar in 1518. It continues to be applied today, notably in a rabbinic ruling outlawing pirated software, issued at Microsoft's request. In From Maimonides to Microsoft, Professor Netanel traces the historical development of Jewish copyright law by comparing rabbinic reprinting bans with secular and papal book privileges and by relaying the stories of dramatic disputes among publishers of books of Jewish learning and liturgy.. He describes each dispute in its historical context and examines the rabbinic rulings that sought to resolve it. Remarkably, the rabbinic reprinting bans and copyright rulings address some of the same issues that animate copyright jurisprudence today: Is copyright a property right or just a right to receive fair compensation? How long should copyrights last? What purposes does copyright serve? While Jewish copyright law has borrowed from its secular law counterpart at key junctures, it fashions strikingly different answers to those key questions. The story of Jewish copyright law also intertwines with the history of the Jewish book trade and with steadfast efforts of rabbinic leaders to maintain their authority to regulate that trade in the face of the dramatic erosion of Jewish communal autonomy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This book will thus be of considerable interest to students of Jewish law and history as well as copyright scholars and practitioners.
Categories: Law

Homelands

Homelands

There is a large volume of such material (mainly reports) sent by the Polish Bureau of the All-Russian Communist Party ... See also Richard Pipes, Jews and the Russian Revolution: a note in Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol.

Author: Nick Baron

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 9780857287441

Category: History

Page:

View: 337

This new volume, by a team of international scholars, explores aspects of population displacement and statehood at a crucial juncture in modern European history, when the entire continent took on the aspect of a 'laboratory atop a mass graveyard' (Tomas Masaryk).
Categories: History

The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies

The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies

33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. Paula E. Hyman (1995), Gender and Assimilation in Modern Jewish History: The Roles and Representation of Women. Seattle: University of Washington Press, ... Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Vol.

Author: Dean Phillip Bell

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781472513267

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 947

The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies is a comprehensive reference guide, providing an overview of Jewish Studies as it has developed as an academic sub-discipline. This volume surveys the development and current state of research in the broad field of Jewish Studies - focusing on central themes, methodologies, and varieties of source materials available. It includes 11 core essays from internationally-renowned scholars and teachers that provide an important and useful overview of Jewish history and the development of Judaism, while exploring central issues in Jewish Studies that cut across historical periods and offer important opportunities to track significant themes throughout the diversity of Jewish experiences. In addition to a bibliography to help orient students and researchers, the volume includes a series of indispensable research tools, including a chronology, maps, and a glossary of key terms and concepts. This is the essential reference guide for anyone working in or exploring the rich and dynamic field of Jewish Studies.
Categories: Religion

The Death of the Shtetl

The Death of the Shtetl

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. 17, ed. ... Rosa Lehmann, “Jewish Patrons and Polish Clients: Patronage in a Small Galician Town,” in Polin, vol. ... 92–152; idem, “Buczacz and Krzemieniec,” Yad Vashem Studies 33 (2005), pp.

Author: Yehuda Bauer

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300152098

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 249

The author recounts the destruction of small Jewish towns in Poland and Russia at the hands of the Nazis in 1941-1942.
Categories: History

Poles in Illinois

Poles in Illinois

between Poles and Jews in Chicago, 1900–1930,” Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry 19 (2007): 117–33, esp. table 1. 2. See F. Niklewicz, Historja Polaków w Stanie Illinois (Green Bay, WI: n.p., 1938), 4, 33. 3. Kruszka, History of Poles in ...

Author: John Radzilowski

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780809337231

Category: Chicago (Ill.)

Page: 244

View: 266

"This short, clear, and comprehensive history of Poles in the state of Illinois from 1818 to the present shows a rich story of diversity and the changing nature of Polish ethnicity in the state over the past 200 years"--
Categories: Chicago (Ill.)

Joe Salsberg

Joe Salsberg

10 Polonsky, Jews in Poland and Russia, 2: 275, 281; see also Glenn Dynner, “The Hasidic Conquest of Small-Town Central Poland, 1754—1818,” in Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. 17, The Shtetl: Myth and Reality, ed.

Author: Gerald Tulchinsky

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442665323

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 232

View: 815

This book follows the life and intellectual journey of Joseph Baruch Salsberg, a Polish-Jewish immigrant who became a major figure of the Ontario Left, a leading voice for human rights in the Ontario legislature, and an important journalist in the Jewish community. His life trajectory mirrored many of the most significant transformations in Canadian political and social life in the twentieth century. Award-winning historian Gerald Tulchinsky traces Salsberg’s personal and professional journey – from his entrance into Toronto’s oppressive garment industry at age 14, which led to his becoming active in emerging trade unions, to his rise through the ranks of the Communist Party of Canada and the Workers’ Unity League. Detailing Salsberg’s time as an influential Toronto alderman and member of the Ontario legislature, the book also examines his dramatic break with communism and his embrace of a new career in journalism. Tulchinsky employs historical sources not used before to explain how Salsberg’s family life and surrounding religious and social milieu influenced his evolution as a Zionist, an important labour union leader, a member of the Communist Party of Canada, and a prominent member of Toronto’s Jewish community.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Cambridge History of Judaism Volume 7 The Early Modern World 1500 1815

The Cambridge History of Judaism  Volume 7  The Early Modern World  1500   1815

... Accusation of Ritual Murder in Poland, 1500–1800,” in Gershon David Hundert, ed., Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. ... 33 Avrie Bar-Levav, “Ritualization of Jewish Life and Death in the Early Modern Period,” Leo Baeck Institute ...

Author: Jonathan Karp

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108138215

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 761

This seventh volume of The Cambridge History of Judaism provides an authoritative and detailed overview of early modern Jewish history, from 1500 to 1815. The essays, written by an international team of scholars, situate the Jewish experience in relation to the multiple political, intellectual and cultural currents of the period. They also explore and problematize the 'modernization' of world Jewry over this period from a global perspective, covering Jews in the Islamic world and in the Americas, as well as in Europe, with many chapters straddling the conventional lines of division between Sephardic, Ashkenazic, and Mizrahi history. The most up-to-date, comprehensive, and authoritative work in this field currently available, this volume will serve as an essential reference tool and ideal point of entry for advanced students and scholars of early modern Jewish history.
Categories: Religion

The Dark Heart of Hitler s Europe

The Dark Heart of Hitler s Europe

... movements: John A. Armstrong, Ukrainian Nationalism (New York, 1963), 18–25, 33–45. 19. Quoted in Andrzej Żbikowski, 'Why did Jews welcome the Soviet Armies?' in Antony Polonsky (ed.), Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Volume 13: ...

Author: Martin Winstone

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780857725196

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 995

After the German attack on Poland in 1939, vast swathes of Polish territory, including Warsaw and Krakow, were occupied by the Nazis in an administration which became known as the 'General Government'. The region was not directly incorporated into the Third Reich but was ruled by a German regime, headed by the brutal and corrupt Governor General Hans Frank. This was indeed the dark heart of Hitler's empire. As the first genuine Nazi colony, the General Government became the principal 'racial laboratory' of the Third Reich. As such, it was the site, and main source of victims, of Aktion Reinhard, the largest killing operation in human history in which at least 1.7 million Jews were murdered in just 18 months, and of a campaign of terror, exploitation and ultimately ethnic cleansing against the Polish population which was intended to serve as a template for the rest of eastern Europe. It was a place where 42,000 people could be shot in two days, where thousands of children could be abducted from their families, never to see their homeland again, and where guidebooks could invite German tourists to enjoy the culture and nightlife of cities that were 'now free of Jews'. This book provides a thorough history of the Nazi occupation regime and the experiences of the Poles, Jews and others who were trapped in its clutches. Employing sources ranging from diaries and testimony to previously underused material such as travel guides and poetry, Martin Winstone provides a unique insight into the occupation regime which dominated much of Poland during World War II with such disastrous consequences.
Categories: History

Lviv Wroc aw Cities in Parallel

Lviv     Wroc  aw  Cities in Parallel

... 33 34 Stephen Greenblatt, “Theatrical Mobility,” in Greenblatt, ed. Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 76. Michael Steinlauf, “Jewish Theatre in Poland,” POLIN: Studies in Polish Jewry vol.

Author: Jan Fellerer

Publisher: Central European University Press

ISBN: 9789633863244

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 677

After World War II, Europe witnessed the massive redrawing of national borders and the efforts to make the population fit those new borders. As a consequence of these forced changes, both Lviv and Wrocław went through cataclysmic changes in population and culture. Assertively Polish prewar Lwów became Soviet Lvov, and then, after 1991, it became assertively Ukrainian Lviv. Breslau, the third largest city in Germany before 1945, was in turn "recovered" by communist Poland as Wrocław. Practically the entire population of Breslau was replaced, and Lwów's demography too was dramatically restructured: many Polish inhabitants migrated to Wrocław and most Jews perished or went into exile. The forced migration of these groups incorporated new myths and the construction of official memory projects. The chapters in this edited book compare the two cities by focusing on lived experiences and "bottom-up" historical processes. Their sources and methods are those of micro-history and include oral testimonies, memoirs, direct observation and questionnaires, examples of popular culture, and media pieces. The essays explore many manifestations of the two sides of the same coin—loss on the one hand, gain on the other—in two cities that, as a result of the political reality of the time, are complementary.
Categories: History

The Nation in the Village

The Nation in the Village

The Genesis of Peasant National Identity in Austrian Poland, 1848–1914 Keely Stauter-Halsted ... An excellent overview of Jewish conditions in Galicia is Israel Bartal and Antony Polonsky, eds., Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol.

Author: Keely Stauter-Halsted

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501702235

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 452

How do peasants come to think of themselves as members of a nation? The widely accepted argument is that national sentiment originates among intellectuals or urban middle classes, then "trickles down" to the working class and peasants. Keely Stauter-Halsted argues that such models overlook the independent contribution of peasant societies. She explores the complex case of the Polish peasants of Austrian Galicia, from the 1848 emancipation of the serfs to the eve of the First World War. In the years immediately after emancipation, Polish-speaking peasants were more apt to identify with the Austrian Emperor and the Catholic Church than with their Polish lords or the middle classes of the Galician capital, Cracow. Yet by the end of the century, Polish-speaking peasants would cheer, "Long live Poland" and celebrate the centennial of the peasant-fueled insurrection in defense of Polish independence. The explanation for this shift, Stauter-Halsted says, is the symbiosis that developed between peasant elites and upper-class reformers. She reconstructs this difficult, halting process, paying particular attention to public life and conflicts within the rural communities themselves. The author's approach is at once comparative and interdisciplinary, drawing from literature on national identity formation in Latin America, China, and Western Europe. The Nation in the Village combines anthropology, sociology, and literary criticism with economic, social, cultural, and political history.
Categories: History

Messengers of Disaster

Messengers of Disaster

Edward Raczynski to Lord Winterton, January 13, 1939, quoted in Bernard Wasserstein, “Polish Influences on British Policy Regarding Jewish Rescue Efforts in Poland 1939–1945,” in Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol.

Author: Annette Becker

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 9780299333201

Category: Genocide

Page: 304

View: 107

Leading up to the second World War, two Polish men witnessed the targeted extermination of Jews under Adolf Hitler and the German Reich before the reality of the Holocaust was known, but their messages were met with skepticism and denial. Annette Becker examines how Jan Karski and Raphael Lemkin have had a lasting influence on ongoing conversations in human rights and law.
Categories: Genocide

In the Shadow of the Shtetl

In the Shadow of the Shtetl

World War,” in Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry 17 (2004): 119—31; and Shimon Redlich, Together and Apart in Brzezany: Poles, ... 33. Lukin, vol. 2, 154. 34. For a recent exploration Of the “encounter” between Nahman and Kafl<a see Rodger ...

Author: Jeffrey Veidlinger

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253011527

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 540

The story of how the Holocaust decimated Jewish life in the shtetls of Eastern Europe is well known. Still, thousands of Jews in these small towns survived the war and returned afterward to rebuild their communities. The recollections of some 400 returnees in Ukraine provide the basis for Jeffrey Veidlinger’s reappraisal of the traditional narrative of 20th-century Jewish history. These elderly Yiddish speakers relate their memories of Jewish life in the prewar shtetl, their stories of survival during the Holocaust, and their experiences living as Jews under Communism. Despite Stalinist repressions, the Holocaust, and official antisemitism, their individual remembrances of family life, religious observance, education, and work testify to the survival of Jewish life in the shadow of the shtetl to this day.
Categories: History

Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe

Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe

33);68 and the Church of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth (formerly part of a Birgittine convent) in Hrodna in ... Social and Cultural Boundaries in Pre-Modern Poland, Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. xxii, Oxford 2010, p.

Author: Aleksandra Koutny-Jones

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004305250

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 526

In Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe, Aleksandra Koutny-Jones examines the remarkable cultural preoccupation with death in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569-1795), through a range of Baroque artworks such as coffin portraits, funerary decorations, tomb chapels and religious landscapes.
Categories: History

Jewish Spaces

Jewish Spaces

34 Jerzy Holzer , Enlightment , Assimilation , and Modern Identity : The Jewish Élite in Galicia , in : Israel Bartal / Antony Polonsky ( Hrsg . ) , Polin . Studies in Polish Jewry . Volume 12 , Focusing on Aspects and Experiences of ...

Author: Petra Ernst

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105132521548

Category: Jews

Page: 277

View: 831

Categories: Jews