Philosophy God and Motion

Philosophy  God and Motion

This volume will prove a major contribution to theology, the history of Christian thought and to the growing field of science and religion.

Author: Simon Oliver

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134237555

Category: Philosophy

Page: 254

View: 394

In the post-Newtonian world motion is assumed to be a simple category which relates to the locomotion of bodies in space, and is usually associated only with physics. This book shows this to be a relatively recent understanding of motion and that prior to the scientific revolution motion was a broader and more mysterious category, applying to moral as well as physical movements. Simon Oliver presents fresh interpretations of key figures in the history of western thought including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas and Newton, examining the thinkers’ handling of the concept of motion. Through close readings of seminal texts in ancient and medieval cosmology and early modern natural philosophy, the books moves from antique to modern times investigating how motion has been of great significance within theology, philosophy and science. Particularly important is the relation between motion and God, following Aristotle traditional doctrines of God have understood the divine as the ‘unmoved mover’ while post-Holocaust theologians have suggested that in order to be compassionate God must undergo the motion of suffering. The text argues that there may be an authentically theological, as well as a natural scientific understanding of motion. This volume will prove a major contribution to theology, the history of Christian thought and to the growing field of science and religion.
Categories: Philosophy

Nature the Soul and God

Nature  the Soul  and God

The complete title of one of the most famous works ever written, Isaac Newton's Principia, was actually Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, or The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.

Author: Jean W. Rioux

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781592446605

Category: Philosophy

Page: 298

View: 583

The complete title of one of the most famous works ever written, Isaac Newton's Principia, was actually Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, or The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Sadly, many contemporary philosophers would be hard-pressed to say just what natural philosophy (or philosophy of nature) is all about. Without question, the philosophy of nature has received relatively less attention than ethics and metaphysics for some time. In Nature, the Soul, and God, Jean W. Rioux has brought together a number of important readings in natural philosophy, from the Pre-Socratic philosophers and Aristotle to the 19th-century entomologist Jean-Henri Fabre. Collectively, they present three ways in which one might conceive of the natural world in a pre-scientific reflection upon the way things are: either the classical materialism of Empedocles, Democritus, and Epicurus, the formalism of Plato, or the hylomorphic view espoused and defended by Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. In the sections following the consideration of nature are selections from these representative views concerning the immortality of the soul and the existence of God. Through the medium of philosophers both ancient and modern, Rioux makes the point that one's philosophical account of the natural world will have an impact upon how one regards human nature, as well as divinity itself. It all begins with nature.
Categories: Philosophy

The Existence of God

The Existence of God

The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction€assesses classical and contemporary arguments concerning the existence of God.

Author: Yujin Nagasawa

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781136737466

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 792

The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction assesses classical and contemporary arguments concerning the existence of God. It is an ideal introduction to philosophy of religion and an excellent starting point for anyone interested in arguments about the existence of God.
Categories: Philosophy

Aristotle on God s Life Generating Power and on Pneuma as Its Vehicle

Aristotle on God s Life Generating Power and on Pneuma as Its Vehicle

In this deep rethinking of Aristotle_s work, Abraham P. Bos argues that scholarship on Aristotle_s philosophy has erred since antiquity in denying the connection between his theology and his doctrine of reproduction and life in the ...

Author: Abraham P. Bos

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438468297

Category: Philosophy

Page: 340

View: 250

Proposes an innovative rethinking of Aristotle’s work as a system that integrates his theology with his doctrine of reproduction and life. In this deep rethinking of Aristotle’s work, Abraham P. Bos argues that scholarship on Aristotle’s philosophy has erred since antiquity in denying the connection between his theology and his doctrine of reproduction and life in the earthly sphere. Beginning with an analysis of God’s role in the Aristotelian system, Bos explores how this relates to other elements of his philosophy, especially to his theory of reproduction. The argument he develops is that in talking about the cosmos, Aristotle rejected Plato’s metaphor of artisanal production by a divine Demiurge in favor of a biotic metaphor based on the transmission of life in reproduction, in which pneuma—not breath as it is often interpreted but the life-bearing spirit in animals and plants—plays a key and sustaining role as the vital principle in all that lives. In making this case, he defends the authenticity of the treatises De Mundo and De Spiritu as Aristotle’s, and demonstrates Aristotle’s works as a unified system that sharply and comprehensively refutes Plato’s, and in particular replaces Plato’s doctrine of the soul with a theory in which the soul is clearly distinguished from the intellect. “Bos offers a fresh, interesting, and important perspective. His interpretation will be very controversial, but if he is right, the standard Anglo-American interpretation of Aristotle will have to change radically.” — Malcolm Wilson, author of Structure and Method in Aristotle’s Meteorologica: A More Disorderly Nature
Categories: Philosophy

God Evil and Ethics

God  Evil  and Ethics

Presents the basic elements of the philosophy of religion tradition in a new and provocative way as original philosophical narrative interspersed with rich selections from Plato, Boethius, Thomas Aquinas, Anselm, Pascal, Descartes, Paley, ...

Author: Eric v.d. Luft

Publisher: Gegensatz Press

ISBN: 9780965517911

Category: Philosophy

Page: 264

View: 858

Presents the basic elements of the philosophy of religion tradition in a new and provocative way as original philosophical narrative interspersed with rich selections from Plato, Boethius, Thomas Aquinas, Anselm, Pascal, Descartes, Paley, Leibniz, Hume, H
Categories: Philosophy

Revisiting Aquinas Proofs for the Existence of God

Revisiting Aquinas    Proofs for the Existence of God

Edited and introduced by Robert Arp, Revisiting Aquinas’ Proofs for the Existence of God is a collection of new papers written by scholars focusing on the famous Five Proofs or Ways (Quinque Viae) for the existence of God put forward by ...

Author: Robert Arp

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004311589

Category: Philosophy

Page: 284

View: 554

Edited and introduced by Robert Arp, Revisiting Aquinas’ Proofs for the Existence of God is a collection of new papers written by scholars focusing on the famous Five Proofs or Ways (Quinque Viae) for the existence of God put forward by St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) near the beginning of his unfinished tome, Summa Theologica.
Categories: Philosophy

Isaac Newton Philosophical Writings

Isaac Newton  Philosophical Writings

This volume collects together Newton's principal philosophical writings for the first time.

Author: Isaac Newton, Sir

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521538483

Category: Philosophy

Page: 148

View: 631

This volume collects together Newton's principal philosophical writings for the first time.
Categories: Philosophy

The Philosophy of Science and Belief in God

The Philosophy of Science and Belief in God

In The Philosophy of Science and Belief in God, Dr. Gordon H. Clark analyzes science from a Biblical and logical perspective.

Author: Gordon Haddon Clark

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105041210308

Category: Physics

Page: 95

View: 970

For the past two centuries Christianity has been subjected to an unrelenting barrage of criticism from scientists who have argued that many historical statements in the Bible are wrong; that man, and the universe as well, evolved-they were not created; that the Bible's view of the universe is primitive and mythological; and that the Christian view of God and man cannot be reconciled with our modem scientific discoveries. In the popular mind, the modern phrase, "it has been scientifically proved" has replaced the Biblical phrase "thus says the Lord," as the final court of appeal. In The Philosophy of Science and Belief in God, Dr. Gordon H. Clark analyzes science from a Biblical and logical perspective. His conclusions are rather startling, perhaps not to scientists themselves, but to many laymen who have been deceived by the modern idolatry of science. Science, says Dr. Clark, can offer no objection to either God or the Bible, for science can never discover truth. It is ever learning but never able to come to the knowledge of truth. Dr. Gordon H. Clark was an eminent Christian philosopher and theologian, the author of 40 books, and the former Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at Butler University. He died in April 1985. Amazon.com.
Categories: Physics

Simplicius On Aristotle On the Heavens 1 1 4

Simplicius  On Aristotle On the Heavens 1 1 4

Even a member of his school, Xenarchus, we are told, rejected his fifth element. The Neoplatonist Simplicius seeks to harmonise Plato and Aristotle.

Author: Simplicius,

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781780939063

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 813

In chapter 1 of On the Heavens Aristotle defines body, and then notoriously ruptures dynamics by introducing a fifth element, beyond Plato's four, to explain the rotation of the heavens, which, like nearly all Greeks, Aristotle took to be real, not apparent. Even a member of his school, Xenarchus, we are told, rejected his fifth element. The Neoplatonist Simplicius seeks to harmonise Plato and Aristotle. Plato, he says, thought that the heavens were composed of all four elements but with the purest kind of fire, namely light, predominating. That Plato would not mind this being called a fifth element is shown by his associating with the heavens the fifth of the five convex regular solids recognised by geometry. Simplicius follows Aristotle's view that one of the lower elements, fire, also rotates, as shown by the behaviour of comets. But such motion, though natural for the fifth elements, is super-natural for fire. Simplicius reveals that the Aristotelian Alexander of Aphrodisias recognised the need to supplement Aristotle and account for the annual approach and retreat of planets by means of Ptolemy's epicycles or eccentrics. Aristotle's philosopher-god is turned by Simplicius, following his teacher Ammonius, into a creator-god, like Plato's. But the creation is beginningless, as shown by the argument that, if you try to imagine a time when it began, you cannot answer the question, 'Why not sooner?' In explaining the creation, Simplicius follows the Neoplatonist expansion of Aristotle's four 'causes' to six. The final result gives us a cosmology very considerably removed from Aristotle's.
Categories: Philosophy

God s Philosophers

God s Philosophers

This is a powerful and a thrilling narrative history revealing the roots of modern science in the medieval world.

Author: James Hannam

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

ISBN: 9781848311589

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 785

This is a powerful and a thrilling narrative history revealing the roots of modern science in the medieval world. The adjective 'medieval' has become a synonym for brutality and uncivilized behavior. Yet without the work of medieval scholars there could have been no Galileo, no Newton and no Scientific Revolution. In "God's Philosophers", James Hannam debunks many of the myths about the Middle Ages, showing that medieval people did not think the earth is flat, nor did Columbus 'prove' that it is a sphere; the Inquisition burnt nobody for their science nor was Copernicus afraid of persecution; no Pope tried to ban human dissection or the number zero. "God's Philosophers" is a celebration of the forgotten scientific achievements of the Middle Ages - advances which were often made thanks to, rather than in spite of, the influence of Christianity and Islam. Decisive progress was also made in technology: spectacles and the mechanical clock, for instance, were both invented in thirteenth-century Europe. Charting an epic journey through six centuries of history, "God's Philosophers" brings back to light the discoveries of neglected geniuses like John Buridan, Nicole Oresme and Thomas Bradwardine, as well as putting into context the contributions of more familiar figures like Roger Bacon, William of Ockham and Saint Thomas Aquinas.
Categories: History

God in Greek Philosophy to the Time of Socrates

God in Greek Philosophy to the Time of Socrates

These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions.

Author: Roy Kenneth Hack

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400877607

Category: Religion

Page: 172

View: 395

A scholarly account of the views on the nature of God held by Greek philosophers up to the time of Socrates. Originally published in 1937. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Categories: Religion

The Philosophy of Abu l Barakat Al Baghdadi with Special Reference to His Concept of Time

The Philosophy of Abu l Barakat Al Baghdadi with Special Reference to His Concept of Time

They are the preserver of the species, guides and instructors, Avicenna, having eliminated the difficulties inherent in time, held that time is a measure of motion with respect to prior and posterior.

Author: Mehmet Dag

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:862754449

Category:

Page:

View: 389

Abu'l-Barakat's philosophy is determined by his critical attitude against the Aristotelian philosophy on one hand and by his appeal to the immediate perceptions of the mind on the other. He was born at Balad nearby Bagdad in 465 A.H./1074 A.D. Having studied at Bagdad, towards the end of his life, he became a Muslim either out of wounded pride or out of fear. He classified sciences into the sciences of existing things which include Physics and Metaphysics; and the sciences of mentally related forms, i.e., Psychology; and the science of sciences, i.e. Logic. Space, according to him, is conceived in the mind prior to everything else as tridimensional, and as capable of being full or empty. The prime matter is identical with the corporeal body. In his theory of motion, his originality lies in his explanation of the motion in the void, accelerated motion, and the quies media. His revolutionary attitude is perhaps best exemplified in his Psychology. According to him, we have an immediate perception of our soul together with existence and time. Every theory which explains soul in terms of faculties or forces is repugnant to him in the Metaphysics, Abu'l-Barakat identifies universals with the mental form. The forms that exist in the mind of God are the causes of the things existing in external reality. God is the direct existentiating cause of everything. Existence, which forms one of our primary apperceptions, is superadded to the things that are existent. Existence, and existent are identified in God. His conception of God is determined by his human psychology. The difference between God and man is one of degree. He identifies celestial bodies with ' angels'. They are the preserver of the species, guides and instructors, Avicenna, having eliminated the difficulties inherent in time, held that time is a measure of motion with respect to prior and posterior. He stressed the continuous nature of time,. Time, eternal duration, and perpetuity belong to the different domains of the universe, Avicenna, by identifying time with the continuity itself, however, may have prepared the way for the identification of time with duration. I n Hellenistic philosophy, this trend started as a reaction against the Aristotelian view. In al-Kindl, we find the traces of Abu'1-Barakat's theory. According to him, the time of a corporeal body is the duration of its existence. Iranshahrl, and al-Razx, under the influence of Galenidentify time with duration, and divide it into absolute and limited. This trend culminates in Abu'l-BaraJcat's theory of time. He puts time, existence, and soul on the same plane in so far as our primary consciousness of them is concerned. Time, being inseparable from existence, must be defined as the measure or the dimension of existence rather than as that of motion. God, being the existence per se, cannot be beyond time. Time, duration, and perpetuity are all one and the same thing. By discarding these distinctions, he unifies the visible and spiritual worlds. The difference between them is only one of degree, otherwise they are closely related to each other.
Categories:

God talk Reconstructed

God talk Reconstructed

Author: Kurian Kachappilly

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015072809091

Category: God (Christianity)

Page: 165

View: 359

Categories: God (Christianity)

On the Existence of God

On the Existence of God

Of the works by Franz Brentano (1838-1917) which have appeared in thus far, perhaps none is better suited to convey a clear idea of the English spirit of the man that this volume of his lectures on proving the existence of God.

Author: F.C. Brentano

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9024735386

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 393

Of the works by Franz Brentano (1838-1917) which have appeared in thus far, perhaps none is better suited to convey a clear idea of the English spirit of the man that this volume of his lectures on proving the existence of God. In order to understand his metaphysics, it would he better to read The Theory of Categories; in order to master the finer points of his psychology, it would be better to read Psychology From an Empirical Standpoint; in order to appreciate his ethical theory, it would be better to read The Origin of Our Knowledge of Right and Wrong or, for a more thorough treatment, The Foundation and Construction of Ethics. But in order to see what it was that gave Brentano the enthusiasm and dedication to do all that work and much more besides, it is necessary to find out what Brentano believed the philosophical enterprise itself to be; and this comes forth most vividly when he bends his philosophical efforts to the subject he considered most important of all, namely, natural theology. For, like Socrates, Brentano brought a kind of religious fervor to his philosophy precisely because he saw it as dealing much better than religion does with the matters that are closest to our hearts.
Categories: Religion

Descartes Spinoza and the New Philosophy

Descartes  Spinoza and the New Philosophy

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: .

Author: James Iverach

Publisher: Theclassics.Us

ISBN: 1230200517

Category:

Page: 68

View: 255

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VI Matter--Matter and Motion--Quantity of Motion--The First and Second Causes--Matter in abstraction from Mind--Matter and Extension--Professor Tait on Newton's Laws of Motion --Criteria of Objective Reality--Development of the Universe according to Natural Law--Mechanical Evolution--Difficulties connected with the System--Fruitf ulness of the Main mechanical Conceptions of Descartes. It is easier to apply the principle of mechanism to material things than to organisms. For material things have no principle of self-action, they move only as they are moved. The postulate of physical science is that it. is inert, and that all bodies continue in the state in which they are, unless they are changed by external force. If this be so, it is evident that the principle of mechanical explanation has not the difficulty to meet, nor the resistance to the acceptance of it, which occurs on the supposition that the body can move itself, and can direct its action from within. This is so obvious that it did not escape the attention of Descartes. The necessity of conserving the fundamental principle of the essential disparity of mind and matter led him to various devices to account for the movements of animals on strictly mechanical principles. But on these we do not dwell. We may, however, dwell on the manner in which he 111 connects the metaphysical and physical parts of his philosophy. God was related to mind as the principle of knowledge; how are we to conceive of the relation of God to matter? In relation to bodies, God is the principle of motion and of rest. Motion needs, he says, a double cause--one universal and general, which is the general cause of all the motions which are in the world; and a particular cause, from which particular...
Categories:

Matter Space and Motion

Matter  Space  and Motion

The nature of matter was as intriguing a question for ancient philosophers as it is for contemporary physicists, and Matter, Space, and Motion presents a fresh and illuminating account of the rich legacy of the physical theories of the ...

Author: Research Professor of Philosophy at King's College London and Fellow Richard Sorabji

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B4128885

Category: Science

Page: 377

View: 647

The nature of matter was as intriguing a question for ancient philosophers as it is for contemporary physicists, and Matter, Space, and Motion presents a fresh and illuminating account of the rich legacy of the physical theories of the Greeks from the fifth century B.C. to the late sixth century A.D.
Categories: Science

Simplicius On Aristotle Physics 8 6 10

Simplicius  On Aristotle Physics 8 6 10

This text provides a translation of Simplicius' commentary on Aristotle's work.

Author: Richard D. McKirahan

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781780938967

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 329

Aristotle's Physics is about the causes of motion and culminates in a proof that God is needed as the ultimate cause of motion. Aristotle argues that things in motion need to be moved by something other than themselves - he rejects Plato's self-movers. On pain of regress, there must be an unmoved mover. If this unmoved mover is to cause motion eternally, it needs infinite power. It cannot, then, be a body, since bodies, being of finite size, cannot house infinite power. The unmoved mover is therefore an incorporeal God. Simplicius reveals that his teacher, Ammonius, harmonised Aristotle with Plato to counter Christian charges of pagan disagreement, by making Aristotle's God a cause of beginningless movement, but of beginningless existence of the universe. Eternal existence, not less than eternal motion, calls for an infinite, and hence incorporeal, force. By an irony, this anti-Christian interpretation turned Aristotle's God from a thinker into a certain kind of Creator, and so helped to make Aristotle's God acceptable to St Thomas Aquinas in the thirteenth century. This text provides a translation of Simplicius' commentary on Aristotle's work.
Categories: Philosophy