Philosophy and Community

Philosophy and Community

This book is the first to offer academic examination of the theoretical contributions and practical applications of community philosophy.

Author: Amanda Fulford

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350073425

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

View: 239

'Why should we care about philosophy?' Public philosophy, or 'doing philosophy' in the community, is an important and growing trend – revealed not only by the phenomenon of the Parisian philosophy café, but also the contemporary rise of multiple grassroots projects, for example the Philosophy in Pubs movement. This book is the first to offer academic examination of the theoretical contributions and practical applications of community philosophy. Bringing together voices from diverse contexts and subject areas, from activism and political action to religious environments, arts organisations and museums to maximum security prisons, this collection asks key questions about the point of making philosophy available for everyone: 'How do you “do philosophy” with the public?'; 'Is philosophy in the community the same as academic philosophy?'; 'Why is community philosophy important?' Including contributions from practitioners and researchers from professional philosophy, education, healthcare, and community philosophy, this collection offers perspectives on a growing area of study. It offers a timely and critical introduction to, and analysis of, what philosophy can be when grounded in socially-engaged activities.
Categories: Philosophy

Liberty and Community

Liberty and Community

Moreover, his writings become more significant when they are related to liberty and community, for these are focal concepts for important problems in modern political philosophy.

Author: R.B. Thigpen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401027984

Category: Social Science

Page: 127

View: 918

This study of the political philosophy of William Ernest Hocking be gan as a doctoral dissertation at Tulane University. Hocking (1873- 1966) was for many years Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity at Harvard University. Although he is relatively well-known among American philosophers, particularly by students of metaphysics and the philosophy of religion, very little atten tion has been given to his political philosophy. Some general studies of his thought summarize his political writings in a very cursory fashion, but they do not discuss his contributions in detail or relate them to significant issues in political philosophy. Most important general works on modern political philosophy or American political thought do not even mention Hocking; a few note his name in passing. Because he is almost completely unknown in the social sciences, the original purpose of this study was to explore, systematize, and present his extensive writings in political philosophy. It then became apparent that his entire political philosophy is oriented around the concepts of liberty and community. When his thought is analyzed in terms of these themes, its unity and coherence are more obvious. Moreover, his writings become more significant when they are related to liberty and community, for these are focal concepts for important problems in modern political philosophy. This study of Hocking's political philosophy will, it is hoped, help us to see how liberty and community can be more understandable, attainable, and compatible with one another.
Categories: Social Science

George Mackay Brown and the Philosophy of Community

George Mackay Brown and the Philosophy of Community

community is itself irreplaceable, insofar as it is inseparable from religious ... the relationship between community and philosophy is inescapable, ...

Author: Baker Timothy Baker

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748640935

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 134

George Mackay Brown has long been recognised as one of the most original and important Scottish writers of the twentieth century. This book is the first comprehensive account of Brown's work from a philosophical perspective and offers a radical new approach to the study of Scottish literature. The importance of local community in the work of Scottish novelists ranging from Walter Scott to Neil M. Gunn has often been noted, but few critics have addressed the relation of this concept to current philosophical and sociological models of community. Timothy C. Baker uses Brown's work as a primary case study to demonstrate that the relationship between the individual and the community is a dominant narrative question in Scottish fiction.Baker traces the development of Brown's writing in relation to contemporary developments in the study of community, drawing on both continental and Anglo-American traditions. Focusing on Brown's novels, Baker argues for Brown's importance not only within a Scottish literary tradition, but as a major thinker of community. The book also suggests the utility of community, as opposed to nation and region, for productive discourse on modern literature. Combining close readings with theoretical elaborations, and including a broad national and historical overview, Baker offers a new perspective both on Brown's work and contemporary national literatures.Key Features:*Offers the first philosophically-informed critique of George Mackay Brown *Shows how fiction can contribute to an understanding of the problems of community in modernity*Suggests new directions for the study of contemporary Scottish literature*Takes into account Brown's late and posthumous writings as well as unpublished material not covered before
Categories: Literary Criticism

Philosophy and Community in Seneca s Prose

Philosophy and Community in Seneca s Prose

In my title I have paired “ philosophy ” with “ community , in preference to more thickly theorized terms like “ society ” or “ culture , ” in order to ...

Author: Carey Seal

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190493219

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 224

View: 266

"Today philosophy's promises to enhance the lives of those who study it are couched, like justifications for the humanistic disciplines more generally, in circumspect terms. In the ancient world, however, philosophy commonly claimed for itself the status of an exclusive guide to happiness. Through philosophy's characteristic practices of argument and rational inquiry, its advocates believed, human beings could learn what was really good for themselves and free themselves from illusion. In the process, they would necessarily come to lead happier lives. This link between learning and action meant that philosophy was often regarded as an entire way of life, in which intellectual activity and practice were closely associated and mutually interdependent. Nowhere else in ancient literature is this ideal given such full and nuanced exposition as in the prose writings of Seneca, in which we can see a philosopher and literary artist of the first rank exploring in detail the dilemmas posed by the confrontation of the idea of the philosophical life with the historical and cultural specificity of the first-century CE Rome in which he wrote. His vast prose oeuvre defends, elaborates, and aims to make appealing this ideal of a life guided by disciplined thought. He is unequivocal about the necessary centrality of philosophy to any attempt at living a good life: philosophy, he writes, "shapes and forges the mind, it puts life in order, it directs actions, it points out what is to be done and what is not to be done, it sits at the helm and steers a course through the hazards of the waves" (animum format et fabricat, vitam disponit, actiones regit, agenda et omittenda demonstrat, sedet ad gubernaculum et per ancipitia fluctuantium derigit cursum, Ep. 16.3). A successful life, for Seneca as for many other ancient philosophers, is governed by, indeed constituted by, the practice of philosophy. His rich and varied corpus, I argue, presents us with a unique opportunity to learn how one reflective and well-informed ancient philosopher reconciled this ideal of philosophical living, and all the aspirations to independence and universality that come with it, to the fact that he and his readers were living in a sociopolitical setting with its own set of norms and customs. These customs, and the claims of community more generally, stand in potential contradiction with the practical guidance philosophy aims to supply. For Seneca, as we will see, this tension was a prodigiously fruitful one. Recent work has rehabilitated Seneca's standing as a major philosopher"--
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Philosophy and Community in Seneca s Prose

Philosophy and Community in Seneca s Prose

Seneca's use of Roman politics and of the institution of slavery in elaborating his ideal of a life guided by reason is carefully examined in the book.

Author: Carey Seal

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190905859

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 284

The Roman philosopher Seneca addressed himself to the question of how we ought to live in letters and treatises that have engaged the attention of readers from his own day to the present. A committed, if critical and eccentric, adherent of Stoicism, he gives us a set of reflections on the good life that are rich both in philosophical subtlety and in vivid engagement with day-to-day life in ancient Rome. Philosophy and Community in Seneca's Prose proposes a new understanding of the relationship between these two facets of Seneca's achievement, examining how he balances the Socratic imperative to subject one's life to rational scrutiny, on the one hand, with the claims of Roman moral tradition on the other. Carey Seal argues that we should think of Seneca neither as a spokesman for Stoicism who seizes opportunistically upon the data of Roman social life to make his case, nor as an expositor of the inherited values of the Roman elite in the language of Stoic philosophy. Rather, Seneca should be understood as someone intensely interested in the question of philosophy's social entanglements and presuppositions. Seneca's use of Roman politics and of the institution of slavery in elaborating his ideal of a life guided by reason is carefully examined in the book.
Categories: Philosophy

Physics Philosophy and the Scientific Community

Physics  Philosophy  and the Scientific Community

The essays presented in Physics, Philosophy, and the Scientific Community (Volume I of Essays in Honor of Robert S. Cohen) focus on philosophical and historical issues in contemporary physics: on the origins and conceptual foundations of ...

Author: Kostas Gavroglu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9048144361

Category: Science

Page: 388

View: 407

In three volumes, a distinguished group of scholars from a variety of disciplines in the natural and social sciences, the humanities and the arts contribute essays in honor of Robert S. Cohen, on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The range of the essays, as well as their originality, and their critical and historical depth, pay tribute to the extraordinary scope of Professor Cohen's intellectual interests, as a scientist-philosopher and a humanist, and also to his engagement in the world of social and political practice. The essays presented in Physics, Philosophy, and the Scientific Community (Volume I of Essays in Honor of Robert S. Cohen) focus on philosophical and historical issues in contemporary physics: on the origins and conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics, on the reception and understanding of Bohr's and Einstein's work, on the emergence of quantum electrodynamics, and on some of the sharp philosophical and scientific issues that arise in current scientific practice (e.g. in superconductivity research). In addition, several essays deal with critical issues within the philosophy of science, both historical and contemporary: e.g. with Cartesian notions of mechanism in the philosophy of biology; with the language and logic of science - e.g. with new insights concerning the issue of a `physicalistic' language in the arguments of Neurath, Carnap and Wittgenstein; with the notion of `elementary logic'; and with rational and non-rational elements in the history of science. Two original contributions to the history of mathematics and some studies in the comparative sociology of science round off this outstanding collection.
Categories: Science

Genealogical Pragmatism

Genealogical Pragmatism

Drawing on the work of popular American writers, American philosophers, and Continental thinkers, this book provides a new interpretation of pragmatism and American philosophy.

Author: John J. Stuhr

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438421544

Category: Philosophy

Page: 300

View: 604

Drawing on the work of popular American writers, American philosophers, and Continental thinkers, this book provides a new interpretation of pragmatism and American philosophy.
Categories: Philosophy

Philosophy in Youth and Community Work

Philosophy in Youth and Community Work

Democracy, tolerance, fairness, trust, respect, conversation, self, society, individualism, collectivism, autonomy - these are the things that youth workers talk about.

Author: Mike Seal

Publisher: Russell House Pub Limited

ISBN: 1905541902

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 943

Democracy, tolerance, fairness, trust, respect, conversation, self, society, individualism, collectivism, autonomy - these are the things that youth workers talk about. But, do they agree with each other on what these all mean? Or, should it matter? It is in the conversations (words) that youth workers have with each other, and the meanings (ideas) used to help young people in their lives that define these practitioners. But, if they are not precise in their arguments and do not begin questioning the assumptions behind their ideas and language, youth workers risk leaving young people unable to reason, and - as a result - in danger of being taken in by rhetoric, slogans, false promises, and propaganda. This book shows how youth workers can explore the assumptions behind their work. It raises questions about the values they should hold in relating to each other, the nature of these relationships, and what it is to be a person in society. The book will help workers at all levels (as well as young people), encouraging a diversity of philosophical outlook and helping to understand the tensions that do arise in youth work.
Categories: Social Science

Physics Philosophy and the Scientific Community

Physics  Philosophy  and the Scientific Community

Essays in the Philosophy and History of the Natural Sciences and ... PHYSICS , COMMUNITY AND THE CRISIS IN PHYSICAL THEORY For Bob : A builder of ...

Author: Kostas Gavroglu

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0792329910

Category: Science

Page: 383

View: 488

In three volumes, a distinguished group of scholars from a variety of disciplines in the natural and social sciences, the humanities and the arts contribute essays in honor of Robert S. Cohen, on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The range of the essays, as well as their originality, and their critical and historical depth, pay tribute to the extraordinary scope of Professor Cohen's intellectual interests, as a scientist-philosopher and a humanist, and also to his engagement in the world of social and political practice. The essays presented in Physics, Philosophy, and the Scientific Community (Volume I of Essays in Honor of Robert S. Cohen) focus on philosophical and historical issues in contemporary physics: on the origins and conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics, on the reception and understanding of Bohr's and Einstein's work, on the emergence of quantum electrodynamics, and on some of the sharp philosophical and scientific issues that arise in current scientific practice (e.g. in superconductivity research). In addition, several essays deal with critical issues within the philosophy of science, both historical and contemporary: e.g. with Cartesian notions of mechanism in the philosophy of biology; with the language and logic of science - e.g. with new insights concerning the issue of a `physicalistic' language in the arguments of Neurath, Carnap and Wittgenstein; with the notion of `elementary logic'; and with rational and non-rational elements in the history of science. Two original contributions to the history of mathematics and some studies in the comparative sociology of science round off this outstanding collection.
Categories: Science

Stress Culture and Community

Stress  Culture  and Community

This original work focuses on how stress evolves and is resolved in the interplay between persons and their social connectedness within family, tribe, and culture.

Author: S.E. Hobfoll

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0306484447

Category: Psychology

Page: 296

View: 509

This original work focuses on how stress evolves and is resolved in the interplay between persons and their social connectedness within family, tribe, and culture. Stress, Culture, and Community maintains that the primary motivation of human beings is to build, protect, and foster their resource reservoirs in order to protect the self and its social attachments. Stevan E. Hobfoll searches for the causes of psychological distress and potential methods of successful stress resistance by probing the ties that bind people in families, communities, and cultures. By focusing on the `process" rather than the `outcomes' of stress, he reshapes the stress dialogue.
Categories: Psychology

Genuine Individuals and Genuine Communities

Genuine Individuals and Genuine Communities

Genuine Individuals and Genuine Communities should be a springboard for the reassessment of contemporary public policy and the reapplication of the American philosophical legacy to current issues and decisions.

Author: Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105019221436

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 657

A cogent blueprint for the development of a public philosophy that integrates shared principles and values into our troubled social structure and articulates a consensus vision of society's future. The continuing vitality of American thought stems, to a large extent, from the application of its historical roots embedded in contemporary problems and issues. Yet for some time the signal contributions of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) have been overlooked in the formulation and shaping of critical areas of public policy. In this brilliantly articulated new book, ethicist Jacquelyn Kegley carefully explicates and enlarges the scope of Roycean thought and shows that Royce's views on public philosophy have direct and valuable application to current social problems. Working from the assumption that issues of family, education, and health care are not merely exigent political tempests but areas of genuine, long-lasting concern, Kegley opens fresh perspectives on Royce's philosophy by introducing and applying his ideas to discussions of how we care for ourselves and our society today. She analyzes Roycean criteria that can be successfully used to nourish developmental stages within families, promote intellectual and social growth in schooling and scholarship, and sustain physical and mental well-being throughout the life cycle. Genuine Individuals and Genuine Communities should be a springboard for the reassessment of contemporary public policy and the reapplication of the American philosophical legacy to current issues and decisions. Kegley's work serves as a solid contribution both to public philosophy and to the continued vitality of American thought, and it extends the range of both.
Categories: Social Science

The Social Philosophers Community and Conflict in Western Thought

The Social Philosophers  Community and Conflict in Western Thought

This essay in social and intellectual history advances the thesis that Western social philosophy arose during the disintegration of the ancient Greek and Roman communities and has been preoccupied ever since with the problem of community ...

Author: Robert A. Nisbet

Publisher: New York : Crowell

ISBN: NWU:35556001834464

Category: Political science

Page: 466

View: 363

This essay in social and intellectual history advances the thesis that Western social philosophy arose during the disintegration of the ancient Greek and Roman communities and has been preoccupied ever since with the problem of community lost and community to be gained. As the author shows, Western ideas of moral authority, freedom, consensus, and personality take on their distinctive character as aspects of Western man's search tor community. Six major types of community in Western life and thought are distinguished by Professor Nisbet: military, political, religious, revolutionary, ecological, and plural. Each of these is presented as a continuing current in Western history and as a vital context to the central ideas of social philosophy. From Plato and Aristotle down to such moderns as Marx, Tocqueville, Weber, Kropotkin, and Fanon we see the dominant ideas and perspectives of Western thought as responses to conflicts and crises--above all, to those affecting man's perennial quest for community.--From publisher description.
Categories: Political science

Community Health Nursing

Community Health Nursing

Author: Wendy Burgess

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: UOM:39015006017027

Category: Social Science

Page: 490

View: 640

Categories: Social Science

Philosophy and Community in Seneca s Prose

Philosophy and Community in Seneca s Prose

"Today philosophy's promises to enhance the lives of those who study it are couched, like justifications for the humanistic disciplines more generally, in circumspect terms.

Author: Carey Blackshear Seal

Publisher:

ISBN: 0190493224

Category: Communities in literature

Page:

View: 217

"Today philosophy's promises to enhance the lives of those who study it are couched, like justifications for the humanistic disciplines more generally, in circumspect terms. In the ancient world, however, philosophy commonly claimed for itself the status of an exclusive guide to happiness. Through philosophy's characteristic practices of argument and rational inquiry, its advocates believed, human beings could learn what was really good for themselves and free themselves from illusion. In the process, they would necessarily come to lead happier lives. This link between learning and action meant that philosophy was often regarded as an entire way of life, in which intellectual activity and practice were closely associated and mutually interdependent. Nowhere else in ancient literature is this ideal given such full and nuanced exposition as in the prose writings of Seneca, in which we can see a philosopher and literary artist of the first rank exploring in detail the dilemmas posed by the confrontation of the idea of the philosophical life with the historical and cultural specificity of the first-century CE Rome in which he wrote. His vast prose oeuvre defends, elaborates, and aims to make appealing this ideal of a life guided by disciplined thought. He is unequivocal about the necessary centrality of philosophy to any attempt at living a good life: philosophy, he writes, "shapes and forges the mind, it puts life in order, it directs actions, it points out what is to be done and what is not to be done, it sits at the helm and steers a course through the hazards of the waves" (animum format et fabricat, vitam disponit, actiones regit, agenda et omittenda demonstrat, sedet ad gubernaculum et per ancipitia fluctuantium derigit cursum, Ep. 16.3). A successful life, for Seneca as for many other ancient philosophers, is governed by, indeed constituted by, the practice of philosophy. His rich and varied corpus, I argue, presents us with a unique opportunity to learn how one reflective and well-informed ancient philosopher reconciled this ideal of philosophical living, and all the aspirations to independence and universality that come with it, to the fact that he and his readers were living in a sociopolitical setting with its own set of norms and customs. These customs, and the claims of community more generally, stand in potential contradiction with the practical guidance philosophy aims to supply. For Seneca, as we will see, this tension was a prodigiously fruitful one. Recent work has rehabilitated Seneca's standing as a major philosopher"--
Categories: Communities in literature

Commandment and Community

Commandment and Community

This book includes contemporary Jewish political practice, and both systematic and historical treatments of issues in Jewish political theory and legal thought.

Author: Daniel H. Frank

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438403199

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 331

This book includes contemporary Jewish political practice, and both systematic and historical treatments of issues in Jewish political theory and legal thought.
Categories: History

Embodiment Relation Community

Embodiment  Relation  Community

In this volume, Garnet C. Butchart shows how human communication can be understood as embodied relations and not merely as a mechanical process of transmission.

Author: Garnet C. Butchart

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271084497

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 905

In this volume, Garnet C. Butchart shows how human communication can be understood as embodied relations and not merely as a mechanical process of transmission. Expanding on contemporary philosophies of speech and language, self and other, and community and immunity, this book challenges many common assumptions, constructs, and problems of communication theory while offering compelling new resources for future study. Human communication has long been characterized as a problem of transmitting information, or the “outward” sharing of “inner thought” through mediated channels of exchange. Butchart questions that model and the various theories to which it gives rise. Drawing from the work of Giorgio Agamben, Roberto Esposito, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Jacques Lacan—thinkers who, along with Martin Heidegger and Michel Foucault, have critiqued the modern notion of a rational subject—Butchart shows that the subject is shaped by language rather than preformed, and that humans embody, and not just use, the signs and contexts of interaction that form what he calls a “communication community.” Accessibly written and engagingly researched, Embodiment, Relation, Community is relevant for researchers and advanced students of communication, cultural studies, translation, and rhetorical studies, especially those who work with a humanistic or interpretive paradigm.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Physics Philosophy and the Scientific Community

Physics  Philosophy  and the Scientific Community

The essays presented in Physics, Philosophy, and the Scientific Community (Volume I of Essays in Honor of Robert S. Cohen) focus on philosophical and historical issues in contemporary physics: on the origins and conceptual foundations of ...

Author: K. Gavroglu

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401726580

Category: Science

Page: 388

View: 447

In three volumes, a distinguished group of scholars from a variety of disciplines in the natural and social sciences, the humanities and the arts contribute essays in honor of Robert S. Cohen, on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The range of the essays, as well as their originality, and their critical and historical depth, pay tribute to the extraordinary scope of Professor Cohen's intellectual interests, as a scientist-philosopher and a humanist, and also to his engagement in the world of social and political practice. The essays presented in Physics, Philosophy, and the Scientific Community (Volume I of Essays in Honor of Robert S. Cohen) focus on philosophical and historical issues in contemporary physics: on the origins and conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics, on the reception and understanding of Bohr's and Einstein's work, on the emergence of quantum electrodynamics, and on some of the sharp philosophical and scientific issues that arise in current scientific practice (e.g. in superconductivity research). In addition, several essays deal with critical issues within the philosophy of science, both historical and contemporary: e.g. with Cartesian notions of mechanism in the philosophy of biology; with the language and logic of science - e.g. with new insights concerning the issue of a `physicalistic' language in the arguments of Neurath, Carnap and Wittgenstein; with the notion of `elementary logic'; and with rational and non-rational elements in the history of science. Two original contributions to the history of mathematics and some studies in the comparative sociology of science round off this outstanding collection.
Categories: Science