Passports of Southeastern Pioneers 1770 1823

Passports of Southeastern Pioneers  1770 1823

The southern states east of the Mississippi were in a territory that was for a long time under Spanish or Indian jurisdiction.

Author: Dorothy Williams Potter

Publisher: Clearfield Company

ISBN: UOM:39015032620299

Category: Reference

Page: 449

View: 958

The southern states east of the Mississippi were in a territory that was for a long time under Spanish or Indian jurisdiction. By law, only persons issued passports were allowed to enter the southeastern territories, and so the passport records have the largest body of data relating to the pioneers to the Southeastern United States.
Categories: Reference

Tracing Your Mississippi Ancestors

Tracing Your Mississippi Ancestors

Passports of Southeastern Pioneers , 1770-1823 : Indian , Spanish and Other Land Passports for Tennessee , Kentucky , Georgia , Mississippi , Virginia , North and South Carolina . Dorothy Williams Potter . Baltimore , MD : Gateway Press ...

Author: Anne S. Lipscomb

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604736984

Category: Reference

Page: 201

View: 244

This easy-to-understand guide through a maze of research possibilities is for any genealogist who has Mississippi ancestry. It identifies the many official state records, incorporated community records, related federal records, and unofficial documents useful in researching Mississippi genealogy. Here the contents of these resources are clearly described, and directions for using them are clearly stated. Tracing Your Mississippi Ancestors also introduces many other helpful genealogical resources, including detailed colonial, territorial, state, and local materials. Among official records are census schedules, birth, marriage, divorce, and death registers, tax records, military documents, and records of land transactions such as deeds, tract books, land office papers, plats, and claims. In addition to noting such frequently used sources as Confederate Army records, this guidebook leads the researcher toward lesser-known materials, such as passenger lists from ships, Spanish court records, midwives' reports, WPA county histories, cemetery records, and information about extinct towns. Since researching forebears who belong to minority groups can be a difficult challenge, this book offers several avenues to discovering them. Of special focus are sources for locating African American and Native American ancestors. These include slave schedules, Freedman's Bureau papers, Civil War rolls, plantation journals, slave narratives, Indian census records, and Indian enrollment cards. To these specialized resources the authors of Tracing Your Mississippi Ancestors append an annotated bibliography of published and unpublished genealogical materials relating to Mississippi. Including over 200 citations, this is by far the most comprehensive list ever given for researching Mississippi genealogy. In addition, all of Mississippi's local, county, and state repositories of genealogical materials are identified, but because most documents for tracing Mississippi ancestors are found at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, the authors have made the state archival collection in Jackson the focus of this book.
Categories: Reference

The Passport in America

The Passport in America

“The Question of Passports.” April 7, 1926, 512. ——— . “Why Passports? ... Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 17701823: Indian, Spanish and other Land Passports for Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, Virginia, North and South ...

Author: Craig Robertson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199779895

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 713

In today's world of constant identification checks, it's difficult to recall that there was ever a time when "proof of identity" was not a part of everyday life. And as anyone knows who has ever lost a passport, or let one expire on the eve of international travel, the passport has become an indispensable document. But how and why did this form of identification take on such a crucial role? In the first history of the passport in the United States, Craig Robertson offers an illuminating account of how this document, above all others, came to be considered a reliable answer to the question: who are you? Historically, the passport originated as an official letter of introduction addressed to foreign governments on behalf of American travelers, but as Robertson shows, it became entangled in contemporary negotiations over citizenship and other forms of identity documentation. Prior to World War I, passports were not required to cross American borders, and while some people struggled to understand how a passport could accurately identify a person, others took advantage of this new document to advance claims for citizenship. From the strategic use of passport applications by freed slaves and a campaign to allow married women to get passports in their maiden names, to the "passport nuisance" of the 1920s and the contested addition of photographs and other identification technologies on the passport, Robertson sheds new light on issues of individual and national identity in modern U.S. history. In this age of heightened security, especially at international borders, Robertson's The Passport in America provides anyone interested in questions of identification and surveillance with a richly detailed, and often surprising, history of this uniquely important document.
Categories: History

Cousin

Cousin

For more details on passports, see Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 17701823, by Dorothy Williams Potter, republished in 2010 by Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland. Attention was turned to Henry Andrew Doan's spouse, ...

Author: Jasper S. Lee

Publisher: Archway Publishing

ISBN: 9781665711852

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 302

View: 764

DNA testing challenges a preacher’s adult son, and newly revealed infidelity stresses family relationships. How does a man cope with learning that his father wasn’t who he thought it was? Author Jasper S. Lee has developed an interest in genealogy and family history in recent years thanks to the discovery of family artifacts dating from the 1840s in the family plantation home. Now he investigates many angles while determining how Bobby Lee Pennington is biologically related to his other family members. Was he a son, cousin, uncle, brother, or something else? Unfortunately, all of Bobby Lee’s ancestors are deceased, so there is no way of obtaining a DNA sample for confirmation. The result leaves him with an interesting and unsettled relationship with the man he had called Daddy—as well as an unclear connection to relatives he didn’t know he had. Presenting a true story built on a foundation of genealogical research, this narrative of family history explores the relationships resulting from an unexpected result of a DNA test.
Categories: Family & Relationships

Red Book

Red Book

These records are housed at the National Archives - Southeast Region ( see page 12 ) . ... see Dorothy Williams Potter , Passports of Southeastern Pioneers , 17701823 : Indian , Spanish and Other Land Passports for Tennessee , Kentucky ...

Author: Alice Eichholz

Publisher: Ancestry Publishing

ISBN: 1593311664

Category: Reference

Page: 812

View: 333

" ... provides updated county and town listings within the same overall state-by-state organization ... information on records and holdings for every county in the United States, as well as excellent maps from renowned mapmaker William Dollarhide ... The availability of census records such as federal, state, and territorial census reports is covered in detail ... Vital records are also discussed, including when and where they were kept and how"--Publisher decription.
Categories: Reference

Bridging Deep South Rivers

Bridging Deep South Rivers

Also receiving a passport at the same time was William Wright of Marlboro District, who might have been the uncle of Ann Wright, the wife of John Godwin. Potter, Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 17701823; citation from Ken Smith's ...

Author: John S. Lupold

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820355399

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 740

Horace King (1807-1885) built covered bridges over every large river in Georgia, Alabama, and eastern Mississippi. That King, who began life as a slave in Cheraw, South Carolina, received no formal training makes his story all the more remarkable. This is the first major biography of the gifted architect and engineer who used his skills to transcend the limits of slavery and segregation and become a successful entrepreneur and builder. John S. Lupold and Thomas L. French Jr. add considerably to our knowledge of a man whose accomplishments demand wider recognition. As a slave and then as a freedman, King built bridges, courthouses, warehouses, factories, and houses in the three-state area. The authors separate legend from facts as they carefully document King's life in the Chattahoochee Valley on the Georgia-Alabama border. We learn about King's freedom from slavery in 1846, his reluctant support of the Confederacy, and his two terms in Alabama's Reconstruction legislature. In addition, the biography reveals King's relationship with his fellow (white) contractors and investors, especially John Godwin, his master and business partner, and Robert Jemison Jr., the Alabama entrepreneur and legislator who helped secure King's freedom. The story does not end with Horace, however, because he passed his skills on to his three sons, who also became prominent builders and businessmen. In King's world few other blacks had his opportunities to excel. King seized on his chances and became the most celebrated bridge builder in the Deep South. The reader comes away from King's story with respect for the man; insight into the problems of financing, building, and maintaining covered bridges; and a new sense of how essential bridges were to the southern market economy.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The House on Diamond Hill

The House on Diamond Hill

The Columhia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001. , eds. ... The Brainerd journal: A Mission to the Cherokees, 1817—1823. ... Passports of Southeastern Pioneers 1770-1823. Baltimore,.

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807834183

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 672

"Displaying pitch-perfect sensibility that weaves profound human empathy with piercing scholarly critique, Tiya Miles lays open the suffering: of all those who found themselves enmeshed in the world of Diamond Hill. At once monument and memorial, the Vann House is Cherokee, African, and American slavery writ large."--- I AMi: s F. brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Shivery, kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands "This is one of the most thoughtful, beautifully written works of history on any topic that I have read in a long while. Miles has taken a complex set of issues that have been long obscured by a desire for a romantic and guilt-free past, and with grace and sensitivity, has completely re-written history."--- Leslie M. Harris. Emory University A James Vann, a Cherokee and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. Tiya Miles tells the story of this plantations founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s. Indeed, this is the first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the Diamond Hill plantation, a cosmopolitan hub of activity where more than one hundred slaves of African descent lived and labored, contributing significandy to the Vann family's famed wealth. This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries---from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book paints rich portraits of the women of these various communities, including Peggy Scott Vann, mistress of Diamond Hill; Pleasant, an enslaved black woman owned by the Moravian Church; and Anna Rosina Gambold, a Moravian missionary diarist. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier of present-day Georgia.
Categories: History

Avenging the People

Avenging the People

... June 22, 1804, ibid., 2: 216–17; Mary Givens Bryan, Passports Issued by Governors of Georgia, 1785 to 1809, 1810 to 1820 (Washington, ... Mississippi Territory,” [1843?], in Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 17701823, ed.

Author: J.M. Opal

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190660260

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 909

Most Americans know Andrew Jackson as a frontier rebel against political and diplomatic norms, a "populist" champion of ordinary people against the elitist legacy of the Founding Fathers. Many date the onset of American democracy to his 1829 inauguration. Despite his reverence for the "sovereign people," however, Jackson spent much of his career limiting that sovereignty, imposing new and often unpopular legal regimes over American lands and markets. He made his name as a lawyer, businessman, and official along the Carolina and Tennessee frontiers, at times ejecting white squatters from native lands and returning slaves to native planters in the name of federal authority and international law. On the other hand, he waged total war on the Cherokees and Creeks who terrorized western settlements and raged at the national statesmen who refused to "avenge the blood" of innocent colonists. During the long war in the south and west from 1811 to 1818 he brushed aside legal restraints on holy genocide and mass retaliation, presenting himself as the only man who would protect white families from hostile empires, "heathen" warriors, and rebellious slaves. He became a towering hero to those who saw the United States as uniquely lawful and victimized. And he used that legend to beat back a range of political, economic, and moral alternatives for the republican future. Drawing from new evidence about Jackson and the southern frontiers, Avenging the People boldly reinterprets the grim and principled man whose version of American nationhood continues to shape American democracy.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Forging a Cherokee American Alliance in the Creek War

Forging a Cherokee American Alliance in the Creek War

Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 17701823: Indian, Spanish, and Other Land Passports for Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, Virginia, North and South Carolina. Baltimore, MD: Gateway, 1982. Prucha, Francis Paul, ed.

Author: Susan M. Abram

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817318758

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 581

Forging a Cherokee-American Alliance in the Creek War explores how the Creek War of 1813-1814 not only affected Creek Indians but also acted as a catalyst for deep cultural and political transformation within the society of the United States' Cherokee allies.
Categories: History

From Jamestown to Texas

From Jamestown to Texas

The following sent to me(Knight) Linda Dumas: (98) Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 1770-1823 by Dorothy Williams Potter, Genealogy Pub. Co., 1982 p.228 State of Georgia Wilkes County, “We the Justices of this District, ...

Author: Betty Smith Meischen

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1453576398

Category: History

Page: 680

View: 987

The rugged character and indomitable spirit of the early pioneers of Stephen F. Austins Texas colony had their roots in a turbulent, distant past. From the early 1600s, their courageous ancestors had pushed westward, leaving the European shores to carve out a new nation from the wilderness. They fled religious and political oppression in search of a better life in which freedom was of supreme importance. Many came with tales of their former struggles in Londonderry, Ireland during the great siege, of terrible massacres and clan rivalries in the times of William Wallace and Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. They vividly remembered the tribulations of Martin Luther and the deadly religious split with the Catholic Church. More recently, memories of their parents participation in the American Revolution, of dramatic, true life scenes such as depicted in the movie The Patriot filled their minds, their fathers having ridden along side of the wily Swamp Fox, Francis Marion. These pioneers associated themselves with men like Travis, Crockett, Houston and Andrew Jackson. Many of these early trailblazers were Scots-Irish and German immigrants. They were on a westward trek to grasp a special prize, to seal Americas Manifest Destiny. And that prize they sought was Texas. From Jamestown to Texas is the story of these intrepid pioneers and their ancestors who cleared and farmed the land, who fought the Indians, battled the elements, and carved out this wonderful country that we have today.
Categories: History