On the Heavens

Author: Aristotle,Aeterna Press

Publisher: Aeterna Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 90

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On the Heavens (Greek: Περὶ οὐρανοῦ, Latin: De Caelo or De Caelo et Mundo) is Aristotle’s chief cosmological treatise: written in 350 BC it contains his astronomical theory and his ideas on the concrete workings of the terrestrial world. It should not be confused with the spurious work On the Universe (De mundo, also known as On the Cosmos).
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Heaven Above the Heavens

Author: World Government Jamigug

Publisher: Strategic Book Publishing

ISBN: 1618976249

Category: Religion

Page: 116

View: 5349

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Do you want to go to heaven? To learn how, read Heaven Above the Heavens.Heaven and hell are thought to be imaginary, but they really do exist. No religion can make you repent your sins and lead you to heaven. Instead, you have to meet heaven to repent. Only through the ?voice,? will you know whether you are forgiven. It is only at Jamigug, where you can meet and listen to the voice of heaven.The name of the nation establishing a world government is called Jamigug. This book explains that heaven, the center of the human race, exists and there is a way to get there after death. Putting your belief in religion will not save you or help you get to heaven. Instead, one has to visit the heaven on Earth, and that place is not a religion.For the first time in history, the human race will be relieved from its apprehension and be free to live in joy and happiness. Readers will discover that there is a way to bring peace to the world, when the power of heaven creates Jamigug to unite the peoples of the world and build a true paradise on Earth.
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On Aristotle's "On the Heavens 1.10-12"

Author: Simplicio

Publisher: Ancient Commentators on Aristotle

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 134

View: 5536

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In the three chapters of "On the Heavens" dealt with in this volume, Aristotle argues that the universe is ungenerated and indestructible. In Simplicius' commentary, translated here, we see a battle royal between the Neoplatonist Simplicius and the Aristotelian, Alexander, whose lost commentary on "On the Heavens" Simplicius partly preserves. Simplicius' rival, the Christian Philoponus, had conducted a parallel battle in his "Against Proclus" but had taken the side of Alexander against Proclus and other Platonists, arguing that Plato's "Timaeus" gives a beginning to the universe. Simplicius takes the Platonist side, denying that Plato intended a beginning. The origin on which Plato refers is, according to Simplicius, not a temporal origin, but the divine cause that produces the world without beginning.
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The Fabric of the Heavens

The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics

Author: Stephen Toulmin,Stephen Edelston Toulmin,June Goodfield

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226808482

Category: Science

Page: 285

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The story of our relationship with the stars and their celestial cousins is long, involving, and full of surprises. The Fabric of the Heavens, by science historians Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield, outlines thinking about astronomy and dynamics from "pre-theoretical" Babylonian times to the Newtonian revolution that seeded our modern conceptions of space. Fully integrating the two cultures of science and the humanities, the authors find evidence of new thinking in Milton's writing and medieval tapestries as well as classic scientific and pre-scientific works. Using language that is beautiful, compelling and precise, they trace the threads of history which are woven into today's science (which, they predict, will find itself woven into something even more startlingly unrecognisable in years hence). Why were the ancients so fascinated by the sky and stars? Interestingly, it seems that their concerns were mostly practical; theological significance took longer to attach itself to the patterns up above. Agricultural and navigational concerns, once resolved, gave way to deeper philosophical, mythological and religious curiosity--which used the mathematical tools of its predecessors to great effect. The lives and works of Aristotle, Copernicus, Galileo and Newton are all thoroughly explored, and it is easier to see the continuity between them and their contemporaries in the breadth of this writing. First published in 1962, The Fabric of the Heavens was one of the first postmodern studies of the development of physical science; even were it not such a pleasure to read, it would still merit careful study.
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Ordering the Heavens

Roman Astronomy and Cosmology in the Carolingian Renaissance

Author: Bruce Eastwood

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004161864

Category: Science

Page: 452

View: 8091

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Based on scores of medieval manuscript texts and diagrams, the book shows how Roman sources were used in the age of Charlemagne to reintroduce and expand a qualitative picture of articulated geometrical order in the heavens.
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Not in the Heavens

The Tradition of Jewish Secular Thought

Author: David Biale

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691168040

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 6344

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Not in the Heavens traces the rise of Jewish secularism through the visionary writers and thinkers who led its development. Spanning the rich history of Judaism from the Bible to today, David Biale shows how the secular tradition these visionaries created is a uniquely Jewish one, and how the emergence of Jewish secularism was not merely a response to modernity but arose from forces long at play within Judaism itself. Biale explores how ancient Hebrew books like Job, Song of Songs, and Esther downplay or even exclude God altogether, and how Spinoza, inspired by medieval Jewish philosophy, recast the biblical God in the role of nature and stripped the Torah of its revelatory status to instead read scripture as a historical and cultural text. Biale examines the influential Jewish thinkers who followed in Spinoza's secularizing footsteps, such as Salomon Maimon, Heinrich Heine, Sigmund Freud, and Albert Einstein. He tells the stories of those who also took their cues from medieval Jewish mysticism in their revolts against tradition, including Hayim Nahman Bialik, Gershom Scholem, and Franz Kafka. And he looks at Zionists like David Ben-Gurion and other secular political thinkers who recast Israel and the Bible in modern terms of race, nationalism, and the state. Not in the Heavens demonstrates how these many Jewish paths to secularism were dependent, in complex and paradoxical ways, on the very religious traditions they were rejecting, and examines the legacy and meaning of Jewish secularism today.
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Simplicius: On Aristotle On the Heavens 1.1-4

Author: Simplicius,

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 178093906X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 5322

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In chapter 1 of On the Heavens Aristotle defines body, and then notoriously ruptures dynamics by introducing a fifth element, beyond Plato's four, to explain the rotation of the heavens, which, like nearly all Greeks, Aristotle took to be real, not apparent. Even a member of his school, Xenarchus, we are told, rejected his fifth element. The Neoplatonist Simplicius seeks to harmonise Plato and Aristotle. Plato, he says, thought that the heavens were composed of all four elements but with the purest kind of fire, namely light, predominating. That Plato would not mind this being called a fifth element is shown by his associating with the heavens the fifth of the five convex regular solids recognised by geometry. Simplicius follows Aristotle's view that one of the lower elements, fire, also rotates, as shown by the behaviour of comets. But such motion, though natural for the fifth elements, is super-natural for fire. Simplicius reveals that the Aristotelian Alexander of Aphrodisias recognised the need to supplement Aristotle and account for the annual approach and retreat of planets by means of Ptolemy's epicycles or eccentrics. Aristotle's philosopher-god is turned by Simplicius, following his teacher Ammonius, into a creator-god, like Plato's. But the creation is beginningless, as shown by the argument that, if you try to imagine a time when it began, you cannot answer the question, 'Why not sooner?' In explaining the creation, Simplicius follows the Neoplatonist expansion of Aristotle's four 'causes' to six. The final result gives us a cosmology very considerably removed from Aristotle's.
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