Nineteenth Century Narratives of Contagion

Nineteenth Century Narratives of Contagion

This intriguing book examines the ways contagion - or disease - inform and shape a wide variety of nineteenth century texts and contexts.

Author: Allan Conrad Christensen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134237340

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 320

View: 941

This intriguing book examines the ways contagion - or disease - inform and shape a wide variety of nineteenth century texts and contexts. Christiensen dissects the cultural assumptions concerning disease, health, impurity and so on before exploring different perspectives on key themes such as plague, nursing and the hospital environment and focusing on certain key texts including Dicken's Bleak House, Gaskell's Ruth, and Zola's Le Docteur Pascal.
Categories: Health & Fitness

Kept from All Contagion

Kept from All Contagion

Connecting groups of authors rarely studied in tandem by highlighting their shared interest in changing interpersonal relationships in the wake of germ theory, this book takes a surprising and refreshing stance on studies in medicine and ...

Author: Kari Nixon

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438478500

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 274

View: 153

Highlights connections between authors rarely studied together by exposing their shared counternarratives to germ theory's implicit suggestion of protection in isolation. Kept from All Contagion explores the surprising social effects of germ theory in the late nineteenth century. Connecting groups of authors rarely studied in tandem by highlighting their shared interest in changing interpersonal relationships in the wake of germ theory, this book takes a surprising and refreshing stance on studies in medicine and literature. Each chapter focuses on a different disease, discussing the different social policies or dilemmas that arose from new understandings in the 1860s–1890s that these diseases were contagious. The chapters pair these sociohistorical considerations with robust literary analyses that assess the ways authors as diverse as Thomas Hardy, Henrik Ibsen, and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, among others, grappled with these ideas and their various impacts upon different human relationships—marital, filial, and social. Through the trifocal structure of each chapter (microbial, relational, and sociopolitical), the book excavates previously overlooked connections between literary texts that insist upon the life-giving importance of community engagement—the very thing that seemed threatening in the wake of germ theory’s revelations. Germ theory seemed to promote self-protection via isolation; the authors covered in Kept from All Contagion resist such tacit biopolitical implications. Instead, as Kari Nixon shows, they repeatedly demonstrate vitalizing interpersonal interactions in spite of—and often because of—their contamination with disease, thus completely upending both the ways Victorians and present-day literary scholars have tended to portray and interpret purity. Kari Nixon is Assistant Professor of Literature at Whitworth University and the coeditor (with Lorenzo Servitje) of Endemic: Essays in Contagion Theory.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Victorian Contagion

Victorian Contagion

This book is an attempt to understands the literary and cultural elements which contributed to fear and anticipation of contagion, and to explain why and how these elements still matter to us today.

Author: Chung-jen Chen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000691542

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 123

Victorian Contagion: Risk and Social Control in the Victorian Literary Imagination examines the literary and cultural production of contagion in the Victorian era and the way that production participated in a moral economy of surveillance and control. In this book, I attempt to make sense of how the discursive practice of contagion governed the interactions and correlations between medical science, literary creation, and cultural imagination. Victorians dealt with the menace of contagion by theorizing a working motto in claiming the goodness and godliness in cleanliness which was theorized, realized, and radicalized both through practice and imagination. The Victorian discourse around cleanliness and contagion, including all its treatments and preventions, developed into a culture of medicalization, a perception of surveillance, a politics of health, an economy of morality, and a way of thinking. This book is an attempt to understands the literary and cultural elements which contributed to fear and anticipation of contagion, and to explain why and how these elements still matter to us today.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Victorian Contagion

Victorian Contagion

This book is an attempt to understands the literary and cultural elements which contributed to fear and anticipation of contagion, and to explain why and how these elements still matter to us today.

Author: Chongren Chen

Publisher:

ISBN: 0367360640

Category: Communicable diseases in literature

Page: 320

View: 340

Victorian Contagion: Risk and Social Control in the Victorian Literary Imagination examines the literary and cultural production of contagion in the Victorian era and the way that production participated in a moral economy of surveillance and control. In this book, I attempt to make sense of how the discursive practice of contagion governed the interactions and correlations between medical science, literary creation, and cultural imagination. Victorians dealt with the menace of contagion by theorizing a working motto in claiming the goodness and godliness in cleanliness which was theorized, realized, and radicalized both through practice and imagination. The Victorian discourse around cleanliness and contagion, including all its treatments and preventions, developed into a culture of medicalization, a perception of surveillance, a politics of health, an economy of morality, and a way of thinking. This book is an attempt to understands the literary and cultural elements which contributed to fear and anticipation of contagion, and to explain why and how these elements still matter to us today.
Categories: Communicable diseases in literature

Narratives of Contamination

Narratives of Contamination

However, the novel itself is an agent of contagion, since writing, as Derrida's pharmakon, exacerbates the problem it meant to solve.

Author: Jessica Selene Zander

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:839214941

Category:

Page: 276

View: 850

This dissertation correlates the evolution of biomedical discourse and prose fiction in nineteenth century Havana, Cuba. Both, I argue, function as narratives that shape collective consciousness in that era. Beginning with the cholera epidemic of 1833, medical language increasingly insinuates itself into the constructions of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Cholera gives rise to medical fictions that invade or "contaminate" many domains of Cuban life. In effect, the disease blurred the distinctions between the concepts of contagion, race, and sin; the physical and the moral were thereby collapsed into one category. The city--understood to be a biological extension of the individual--was threatened by barbaric racial "outsiders." Their intrusive presence corrupted the entire Cuban social body. In the end, the cholera epidemic led to a symbolic, if not a physical, cleansing of the colonial city. The early Cuban novel functions as a laboratory or taller in which theories of purity and disease develop and mature. The individual subject, a microcosm of the larger Cuban social body, becomes the locus of the desire to see and to know enigmatic disease. As the "clinical eye" of the medicalized viewer searches the body for signs of contagion, it defines the hygienic Cuban subject against its impure, racialized Other. However, the novel itself is an agent of contagion, since writing, as Derrida's pharmakon, exacerbates the problem it meant to solve. I argue that the Cuban novel not only unmasked the fiction of stable identities; it also anticipated fin-de-siècle European narratives of degeneration and decline.
Categories:

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Aging in Nineteenth Century Culture

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Aging in Nineteenth Century Culture

1 on Aging in NineteenthCentury Culture Edited by Katharina Boehm, Anna. Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad ...

Author: Anne-Julia Zwierlein

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136669026

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 473

This essay collection develops new perspectives on constructions of old age in literary, legal, scientific and periodical cultures of the nineteenth century. Rigorously interdisciplinary, the book places leading researchers of old age in nineteenth-century literature in dialogue with experts from the fields of cultural, legal and social history. It revisits the origins of many modern debates about aging in the nineteenth century – a period that saw the emergence of cultural and scientific frameworks for the understanding of old age that continue to be influential today. The contributors provide fresh readings of canonical texts by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope, Thomas Hardy, Henry James and others. The volume builds momentum in the burgeoning field of aging studies. It argues that the study of old age in the nineteenth century has entered a new and distinctly interdisciplinary phase that is characterized by a set of research interests that are currently shared across a range of disciplines and that explore conceptions of old age in the nineteenth century by privileging, respectively, questions of agency, of place, of gender and sexuality, and of narrative and aesthetic form.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Narrative Hospitality in Late Victorian Fiction

Narrative Hospitality in Late Victorian Fiction

1 Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad Christensen 2 Victorian Servants, Class, and the Politics of Literacy Jean ...

Author: Rachel Hollander

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136156267

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 472

Bringing together poststructuralist ethical theory with late Victorian debates about the morality of literature, this book reconsiders the ways in which novels engender an ethical orientation or response in their readers, explaining how the intersections of nation, family, and form in the late realist English novel produce a new ethics of hospitality. Hollander reads texts that both portray and enact a unique ethical orientation of welcoming the other, a narrative hospitality that combines the Victorians’ commitment to engaging with the real world with a more modern awareness of difference and the limits of knowledge. While classic nineteenth-century realism rests on a sympathy-based model of moral relations, novels by authors such as George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Olive Schreiner present instead an ethical recognition of the distance between self and other. Opening themselves to the other in their very structure and narrative form, the visited texts both represent and theorize the ethics of hospitality, anticipating twentieth-century philosophy’s recognition of the limits of sympathy. As colonial conflicts, nationalist anxiety, and the intensification of the "woman question" became dominant cultural concerns in the 1870s and 80s, the problem of self and other, known and unknown, began to saturate and define the representation of home in the English novel. This book argues that in the wake of an erosion of confidence in the ability to understand that which is unlike the self, a moral code founded on sympathy gave way to an ethics of hospitality, in which the concept of home shifts to acknowledge the permeability and vulnerability of not only domestic but also national spaces. Concluding with Virginia Woolf’s reexamination of the novel’s potential to educate the reader in negotiating relations of alterity in a more fully modernist moment, Hollanders suggest that the late Victorian novel embodies a unique and previously unrecognized ethical mode between Victorian realism and a post-World- War-I ethics of modernist form.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Contagionism and Contagious Diseases

Contagionism and Contagious Diseases

Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion: Our Feverish Contact. London: Routledge, 2005. Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, George Whalley, and H. J. Jackson.

Author: Thomas Rütten

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110306118

Category: Medical

Page: 248

View: 644

The idea of contagious transmission, either by material particles or by infectious ideas, has played a powerful role in the development of the Western World since antiquity. Yet it acquired quite a precise signature during the process of scientific and cultural differentiation in the 19th and early 20th centuries. This volume explores the significance and cultural functions of contagionism in this period, from notions of infectious homosexuality and the concept of social contagion to the political implications of bacteriological fieldwork. The history of the concept ‘microbe’ in aesthetic modernism is adressed as well as bacteriological metaphors in American literary historiography. Within this broad framework, contagionism as a literary narrative is approached in more focussed contributions: from its emotional impact in literary modernism to the idea of physical or psychic contagion in authors such as H.G. Wells, Kurt Lasswitz, Gustav Meyrinck, Ernst Weiss, Thomas Mann and Max Frisch. This twofold approach of general topics and individual literary case studies produces a deeper understanding of the symbolic implications of contagionism marking the boundaries between sick and healthy, familiar and alien, morally pure and impure.
Categories: Medical

Neo Victorian Literature and Culture

Neo Victorian Literature and Culture

Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad Christensen Victorian Servants, Class, and the Politics of Literacy Jean ...

Author: Nadine Boehm-Schnitker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134614691

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

View: 392

This book provides a comprehensive reflection of the processes of canonization, (un)pleasurable consumption and the emerging predominance of topics and theoretical concerns in neo-Victorianism. The repetitions and reiterations of the Victorian in contemporary culture document an unbroken fascination with the histories, technologies and achievements, as well as the injustices and atrocities, of the nineteenth century. They also reveal that, in many ways, contemporary identities are constructed through a Victorian mirror image fabricated by the desires, imaginings and critical interests of the present. Providing analyses of current negotiations of nineteenth-century texts, discourses and traumas, this volume explores the contemporary commodification and nostalgic recreation of the past. It brings together critical perspectives of experts in the fields of Victorian literature and culture, contemporary literature, and neo-Victorianism, with contributions by leading scholars in the field including Rosario Arias, Cora Kaplan, Elizabeth Ho, Marie-Luise Kohlke and Sally Shuttleworth. Neo-Victorian Literature and Culture interrogates current fashions in neo-Victorianism and their ideological leanings, the resurrection of cultural icons, and the reasons behind our relationship with and immersion in Victorian culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Endemic

Endemic

This book develops a new multimodal theoretical model of contagion for interdisciplinary scholars, featuring contributions from influential scholars spanning the fields of medical humanities, philosophy, political science, media studies, ...

Author: Kari Nixon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137521415

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 367

This book develops a new multimodal theoretical model of contagion for interdisciplinary scholars, featuring contributions from influential scholars spanning the fields of medical humanities, philosophy, political science, media studies, technoculture, literature, and bioethics. Exploring the nexus of contagion's metaphorical and material aspects, this volume contends that contagiousness in its digital, metaphorical, and biological forms is a pervasively endemic condition in our contemporary moment. The chapters explore both endemicity itself and how epidemic discourse has become endemic to processes of social construction. Designed to simultaneously prime those new to the discourse of humanistic perspectives of contagion, complicate issues of interest to seasoned scholars of science and technology studies, and add new topics for debate and inquiry in the field of bioethics, Endemic will be of wide interest for researchers and educators.
Categories: Social Science

Die Lesbarkeit der Romantik

Die Lesbarkeit der Romantik

Bell, Matthew: The German Tradition of Psychology in Literature and Thought, ... Christensen, Allan Conrad: Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion: „Our ...

Author: Erich Kleinschmidt

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110217827

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 343

View: 417

What is Romanticism? To answer this question, it is not enough to perpetuate the established views propagated in literary studies. Instead, this volume is concerned with making readable a knowledge culture for Romanticism and its semiotic systems. The chapters reflect in an interdisciplinary manner the communication on offer from Romanticism of its own understanding of literature and art and reconstruct how in different media, discourses and aesthetic processes the Romanticisation of the world is projected and effected as an ordering of knowledge. Thus they provide an opportunity for the exemplary formulation of a versatile cultural hermeneutics. "
Categories: Literary Criticism

Dickens Novels as Poetry

Dickens  Novels as Poetry

Routledge Studies in NineteenthCentury Literature 1 Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad Christensen 2 Victorian ...

Author: Jeremy Tambling

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317612889

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

View: 752

Focusing on the language, style, and poetry of Dickens’ novels, this study breaks new ground in reading Dickens’ novels as a unique form of poetry. Dickens’ writing disallows the statement of single unambiguous truths and shows unconscious processes burrowing within language, disrupting received ideas and modes of living. Arguing that Dickens, within nineteenth-century modernity, sees language as always double, Tambling draws on a wide range of Victorian texts and current critical theory to explore Dickens’ interest in literature and popular song, and what happens in jokes, in caricature, in word-play and punning, and in naming. Working from Dickens’ earliest writings to the latest, deftly combining theory with close analysis of texts, the book examines Dickens’ key novels, such as Pickwick Papers, Martin Chuzzlewit, Dombey and Son, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend. It considers Dickens as constructing an urban poetry, alert to language coming from sources beyond the individual, and relating that to the dream-life of characters, who both can and cannot awake to fuller, different consciousness. Drawing on Walter Benjamin, Lacan, and Derrida, Tambling shows how Dickens writes a new and comic poetry of the city, and that the language constitutes an unconscious and secret autobiography. This volume takes Dickens scholarship in exciting new directions and will be of interest to all readers of nineteenth-century literary and cultural studies, and more widely, to all readers of literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Nineteenth century Literature

Nineteenth century Literature

Jackson : University Press of Mississippi , 2005. Pp . xx + 289. $ 40 .
CHRISTENSEN , ALLAN CONRAD . Nineteenth - Century Narratives of
Contagion : “ Our Feverish Contact . ” Routledge Studies in NineteenthCentury
Literature Series .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:49015003222354

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 329

Categories: American literature

Walt Whitman and British Socialism

Walt Whitman and British Socialism

Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad Christensen Victorian Servants, Class, and the Politics of Literacy Jean ...

Author: Kirsten Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317634812

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 927

This is the first sustained examination of Walt Whitman’s influence on British socialism. Harris combines a contextual historical study of Whitman’s reception with focused close readings of a variety of poems, books, articles, letters and speeches. She calls attention to Whitman’s own demand for the reader to ‘himself or herself construct indeed the poem, argument, history, metaphysical essay’, linking Whitman’s general comments about active reading to specific cases of his fin de siècle British socialist readership. These include the editorial aims behind the Whitman selections published by William Michael Rossetti, Ernest Rhys, and W. T. Stead and the ways that Whitman was interpreted and appropriated in a wide range of grassroots texts produced by individuals or groups who responded to Whitman and his poetry publicly in socialist circles. Harris makes full use of material from the C. F. Sixsmith and J. W. Wallace and the Bolton Whitman Fellowship collections at John Rylands, the Edward Carpenter collection in the Sheffield Archives, and the Archives of Swan Sonnenschein & Co. at the University of Reading. Much of this archive material – little of which is currently available in digital form – is discussed here in full for the first time. Accordingly, this study will appeal to those with interest in the archival history of nineteenth-century literary culture, as well as the connections to be made between literary and political culture of this era more generally.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Economies of Desire at the Victorian Fin de Si cle

Economies of Desire at the Victorian Fin de Si  cle

Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad Christensen Victorian Servants, Class, and the Politics of Literacy Jean ...

Author: Jane Ford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317576594

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 188

This volume marks the first sustained study to interrogate how and why issues of sexuality, desire, and economic processes intersect in the literature and culture of the Victorian fin de siècle. At the end of the nineteenth-century, the move towards new models of economic thought marked the transition from a marketplace centred around the fulfilment of ‘needs’ to one ministering to anything that might, potentially, be desired. This collection considers how the literature of the period meditates on the interaction between economy and desire, doing so with particular reference to the themes of fetishism, homoeroticism, the literary marketplace, social hierarchy, and consumer culture. Drawing on theoretical and conceptual approaches including queer theory, feminist theory, and gift theory, contributors offer original analyses of work by canonical and lesser-known writers, including Oscar Wilde, A.E. Housman, Baron Corvo, Vernon Lee, Michael Field, and Lucas Malet. The collection builds on recent critical developments in fin-de-siècle literature (including major interventions in the areas of Decadence, sexuality, and gender studies) and asks, for instance, how did late nineteenth-century writing schematise the libidinal and somatic dimensions of economic exchange? How might we define the relationship between eroticism and the formal economies of literary production/performance? And what relation exists between advertising/consumer culture and (dissident) sexuality in fin-de-siecle literary discourses? This book marks an important contribution to 19th-Century and Victorian literary studies, and enhances the field of fin-de-siècle studies more generally.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Plague and Contagion in the Islamic Mediterranean

Plague and Contagion in the Islamic Mediterranean

How did it become a boundary marker between Europe and the Orient in the nineteenth century? And, how did the narrative of epidemiological boundaries create ...

Author: Nukhet Varlik

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781942401162

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 194

This volume discusses diseases that affected human and non-human populations in areas stretching from the Red Sea and Egypt to Anatolia, the Balkans, and the Black Sea, in the early modern and modern eras. It tackles various questions of historiography and sources, tests new interdisciplinary methodologies, and asks new questions while revisiting older ones. Lastly, it contributes to Ottoman studies, the history of medicine, Mediterranean and European history, as well as global studies on the role of epidemics in history.
Categories: History

A Female Poetics of Empire

A Female Poetics of Empire

Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Contagion 'Our Feverish Contact' Allan Conrad Christensen Victorian Servants, Class, and the Politics of Literacy Jean ...

Author: Julia Kuehn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134663064

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 647

Many well-known male writers produced fictions about colonial spaces and discussed the advantages of realism over romance, and vice versa, in the ‘art of fiction’ debate of the 1880s; but how did female writers contribute to colonial fiction? This volume links fictional, non-fictional and pictorial representations of a colonial otherness with the late nineteenth-century artistic concerns about representational conventions and possibilities. The author explores these texts and images through the postcolonial framework of ‘exoticism’, arguing that the epistemological dilemma of a ‘self’ encountering an ‘other’ results in the interrelated predicament to find poetic modalities – mimetic, realistic and documentary on the one hand; romantic, fantastic and picturesque on the other – that befit an ‘exotic’ representation. Thus women writers did not only participate in the making of colonial fictions but also in the late nineteenth-century artistic debate about the nature of fiction. This book maps the epistemological concerns of exoticism and of difference – self and other, home and away, familiarity and strangeness – onto the representational modes of realism and romance. The author focuses exclusively on female novelists, travel writers and painters of the turn-of-the-century exotic, and especially on neglected authors of academically under-researched genres such as the bestselling novel and the travelogue.
Categories: Literary Criticism