The Newspaper Press Directory and Advertisers' Guide: 73rd

Author: Anonymous

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN: 9780353072152

Category: History

Page: 658

View: 952

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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Powers of the Press

Newspapers, Power and the Public in Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Aled Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351909460

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 2698

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The power of the popular press presents all modern societies with difficulties. It is, however, a problem with a history: the hold of the press over public opinion was debated with urgency throughout the 19th century. This book looks at the ways in which individuals, pressure groups, political organisations and the state sought to understand the mass communications media of the 19th century, and use them to influence public opinion and effect moral and social reform. Aled Jones addresses the problem by using three approaches: first he considers the 19th century theories of the influence of communications media on patterns of social thought and behaviour; then he examines attitudes towards the press in both high and popular culture; finally he explores the social and intellectual world of the reader, the consumer both of the press as a commodity and of the hidden moral strategies that were built into it. The tensions between Victorian moral imperatives and the operation of the free commercial market raised issues of great public concern, such as whether the mass media should be under private or public control. These tensions have dominated the way in which Britain and other western societies have thought about the newer broadcasting media, but their origins are older and more complex than studies of contemporary media acknowledge.
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The News of the World and the British Press, 1843-2011

'Journalism for the Rich, Journalism for the Poor'

Author: Laurel Brake,Chandrika Kaul,Mark W. Turner

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137392053

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 906

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This volume is the first scholarly treatment of the News of the World from news-rich broadsheet to sensational tabloid. Contributors uncover new facts and discuss a range of topics including Sunday journalism, gender, crime, empire, political cartoons, the mass market, investigative techniques and the Leveson Inquiry.
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The Voice of the Provinces

The Regional Press in Revolutionary Ireland, 1914-1921

Author: Christopher Doughan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1786942259

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8575

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Ireland's regional newspapers were among the first to record the turbulent events that took place in the country between 1914 and 1921. But who were the personalities behind these papers and what was their background? Did they remain as impassive bystanders while dramatic developments unfolded or were they willing or unwilling participants? What were the difficulties they faced when reporting such formative and sometimes violent events? This book addresses these questions and provides a comprehensive portrayal of the regional press across the entire island at that time. The origins of Ireland's contemporary provincial newspapers, both nationalist and unionist, as well as independent, are examined and those who ran such publications are profiled. Additionally, the manner in which many of these titles reacted to events during these years is scrutinised and analysed. How did they respond to the Easter Rising? Did they foresee the rise of Sinn Féin? Did they approve of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921? This was a time when regional newspapers risked censorship, suppression, possible closure, and ultimately violent attack. This book records their experiences and charts the history of Ireland's regional press during the tumultuous and violent years leading up to independence.
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Victorians Against the Gallows

Capital Punishment and the Abolitionist Movement in Nineteenth Century Britain

Author: James Gregory

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857730886

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1300

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By the time that Queen Victoria ascended the throne in 1837, the list of crimes liable to attract the death penalty had effectively been reduced to murder. Yet, despite this, the gallows remained a source of controversy in Victorian Britain and there was a growing unease in liberal quarters surrounding the question of capital punishment. In this book, James Gregory examines organised efforts to abolish capital punishment in Britain and the Empire in the Victorian era, focusing particularly on the activities of the Society for the Abolition of Capital Punishment. The amelioration of the notoriously ‘Bloody Code’ of the British state may have limited capital punishment effectively to a small number of murderers after 1840 but, despite this, capital punishment was a matter of perennial debate, from the local arena of school debating societies to the ‘imperial Parliament’, and a topic to trouble the minds of thoughtful Victorians across the British world. Drawing on a wide range of sources, from pamphlets by abolitionists or their opponents to gallows broadsides, official inquiries, provincial newspapers, novels and short stories, Gregory studies a movement acknowledged by contemporaries to be agitating one of the ‘questions of the day’ - challenging as it did contemporary theology, state infliction of violence, and prevalent ideas about punishment. He explores important aspects such as: capital punishment debates in the ‘Lex Britannica’ of British colonies and dominions, the role of women abolitionists and the class and gendered inflexions to the ‘gallows question’, the representation of the problem of capital punishment in Victorian fiction, and the relationship between abolitionists and the Home Office which exercised the royal prerogative of mercy. While the abolitionism of Nonconformist reformers such as the Quakers and Unitarians is familiar, Gregory introduces the reader to the abolitionist debates in Jewish, secularist and spiritualist circles, and explores themes such as the imagined role of the Queen as ‘fount of mercy’ and the disturbing figure of the hangman. Studying the provincial, national and international aspects to the movement, Victorians Against the Gallows offers an important contribution to our understanding of Victorian reform activities, and Victorian culture.
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