Newsonomics

Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get

Author: Ken Doctor

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781429968348

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 3040

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The New News Reports of the death of the news media are highly premature, though you wouldn't know it from the media's own headlines. Ken Doctor goes far beyond those headlines, taking an authoritative look at the fast-emerging future. The Twelve Laws of Newsonomics reveal the kinds of news that readers will get and that journalists (and citizens) will produce as we enter the first truly digital news decade. A new Digital Dozen, global powerhouses from The New York Times, News Corp, and CNN to NBC, the BBC, and NPR will dominate news across the globe, Locally, a colorful assortment of emerging news players, from Boston to San Diego, are rewriting the rules of city reporting, Newsonomics provides a new sense of the news we'll get on paper, on screen, on the phone, by blog, by podcast, and via Facebook and Twitter. It also offers a new way to understand the why and how of the changes, and where the Googles, Yahoos and Microsofts fit in. Newsonomics pays special attention to media and journalism students in a chapter on the back-to-the-future skills they'll need, while marketing professionals get their own view of what the changes mean to them.
Release

Democracy’s Detectives

Author: James T. Hamilton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674545508

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 5678

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Investigative journalism holds democracies and individuals accountable to the public. But important stories are going untold as news outlets shy away from the expense of watchdog reporting. Computational journalism, using digital records and data-mining algorithms, promises to lower the cost and increase demand among readers, James Hamilton shows.
Release

Innovators in Digital News

Author: Lucy King

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1784534161

Category: Computers

Page: 160

View: 5310

DOWNLOAD NOW »

News organizations are struggling with technology transitions and fearful for their future. Yet some are succeeding. * Why are organizations such as Vice and BuzzFeed investing in journalism and why are pedigree journalists joining them? * Why are news organizations making journalists redundant but recruiting technologists? * Why does everyone seem to be embracing native advertising? * Why are some news organizations more innovative than others? Drawing on extensive first-hand research, Innovators in Digital News explains how different international media organizations approach digital news and pinpoints the common factors that help build their success.
Release

The Social Fact

News and Knowledge in a Networked World

Author: John P. Wihbey

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262039591

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 328

View: 5834

DOWNLOAD NOW »

How the structure of news, information, and knowledge is evolving and how news media can foster social connection. While the public believes that journalism remains crucial for democracy, there is a general sense that the news media are performing this role poorly. In The Social Fact, John Wihbey makes the case that journalism can better serve democracy by focusing on ways of fostering social connection. Wihbey explores how the structure of news, information, and knowledge and their flow through society are changing, and he considers ways in which news media can demonstrate the highest possible societal value in the context of these changes. Wihbey examines network science as well as the interplay between information and communications technologies (ICTs) and the structure of knowledge in society. He discusses the underlying patterns that characterize our increasingly networked world of information—with its viral phenomena and whiplash-inducing trends, its extremes and surprises. How can the traditional media world be reconciled with the world of social, peer-to-peer platforms, crowdsourcing, and user-generated content? Wihbey outlines a synthesis for news producers and advocates innovation in approach, form, and purpose. The Social Fact provides a valuable framework for doing audience-engaged media work of many kinds in our networked, hybrid media environment. It will be of interest to all those concerned about the future of news and public affairs.
Release

The Watchdog That Didn’t Bark

The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism

Author: Dean Starkman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231536283

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 7897

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In this sweeping, incisive post mortem, Dean Starkman exposes the critical shortcomings that softened coverage in the business press during the mortgage era and the years leading up to the financial collapse of 2008. He locates the roots of the problem in the origin of business news as a market messaging service for investors in the early twentieth century. This access-dependent strain of journalism was soon opposed by the grand, sweeping work of the muckrakers. Propelled by the innovations of Bernard Kilgore, the great postwar editor of the Wall Street Journal, these two genres merged when mainstream American news organizations institutionalized muckraking in the 1960s, creating a powerful guardian of the public interest. Yet as the mortgage era dawned, deep cultural and structural shifts—some unavoidable, some self-inflicted—eroded journalism's appetite for its role as watchdog. The result was a deafening silence about systemic corruption in the financial industry. Tragically, this silence grew only more profound as the mortgage madness reached its terrible apogee from 2004 through 2006. Starkman frames his analysis in a broad argument about journalism itself, dividing the profession into two competing approaches—access reporting and accountability reporting—which rely on entirely different sources and produce radically different representations of reality. As Starkman explains, access journalism came to dominate business reporting in the 1990s, a process he calls "CNBCization," and rather than examining risky, even corrupt, corporate behavior, mainstream reporters focused on profiling executives and informing investors. Starkman concludes with a critique of the digital-news ideology and corporate influence, which threaten to further undermine investigative reporting, and he shows how financial coverage, and journalism as a whole, can reclaim its bite.
Release

Communicating Politics Online

Author: Chapman Rackaway

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137437979

Category: Political Science

Page: 123

View: 7730

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The world of political communication is morphing almost constantly into new areas and realities. Online-only news, Web 2.0 user-created content, hyperlocal news, and the rise of the Twittersphere have all contributed to an ever-changing media environment. Communicating Politics Online captures the constant change of new online media.
Release

The Information Needs of Communities

The Changing Media Landscape in a Broadband Age

Author: Steven Waldman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 1865

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In 2009, a bipartisan Knight Commission found that while the broadband age is enabling an information and communications renaissance, local communities in particular are being unevenly served with critical information about local issues. Soon after the Knight Commission delivered its findings, The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) initiated a working group to identify crosscurrents and trends, and make recommendations on how the information needs of communities can be met in a broadband world.Steven Waldman and the FCC Working Group on the Information Needs of Communities produced this report, addressing the rapidly changing media landscape in a broadband age. The Information Needs of Communities looks not only at the changing face of media, but also at the relevant policy and regulatory situations, including the track record of the FCC. Finally, the report offers policy suggestions to help create the best media system ever seen.
Release

Deadlines and Disruption: My Turbulent Path from Print to Digital

Author: Stephen Shepard

Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

ISBN: 0071802649

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 7156

DOWNLOAD NOW »

A Top Editor’s Take on the State of Journalism Today—and His Prescient Forecast of Its Future “This is a personal and insightful book about one of the most important questions of our time: how will journalism make the transition to the digital age? Steve Shepard made that leap bravely when he went from being a great magazine editor to the first dean of the City University of New York journalism school. His tale is filled with great lessons for us all.” —Walter Isaacson, bestselling author of Steve Jobs “An insightful and convivial account of a bright, bountiful life dedicated to words, information and wonder.” —Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review) "This is two compelling books in one: Shepard’s story of his life in print journalism, and a clearheaded look at the way journalism is evolving due to electronic media, social networking, and the ability of anyone with a computer and an opinion to make him- or herself heard." —Booklist Shepard's book will resonate with many and should be read by anyone interested in the flow of information today and its simpact on society as a whole." —Library Journal “The book is in part a memoir, a tale of a life lived at the height of print journalism when print journalism itself was at its height. But it is also an analysis, an examination of the new challenges facing an old industry as it ambles and occasionally sprints its way into the digital age.” —The Washington Post About the Book: “My personal passage is, in many ways, a microcosm of the larger struggle within the journalism profession to come to terms with the digital reckoning. Will the new technologies enhance journalism . . . or water it down for audiences with diminished attention spans? What new business models will emerge to sustain quality journalism?” Stephen B. Shepard has seen it all. Editor-in-chief of BusinessWeek for more than 20 years, Shepard helped transform the magazine into one of the most respected voices of its time. But after his departure, he saw it collapse—another victim of the digital age. In Deadlines and Disruption, Shepard recounts his five decades in journalism—a time of radical transformations in the way news is developed, delivered, and consumed. Raised in the Bronx, Shepard graduated from City College and Columbia, joined BusinessWeek as a reporter, and rose to the top editorial post. He has closed the circle by returning to the university that spawned him, founding the Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York. In the digital age, anyone can be a journalist. Opinion pieces are replacing original reporting as the coin of the realm. And an entire generation is relying on Facebook friends and Twitter feeds to tell them what to read. Is this the beginning of an irreversible slide into third-rate journalism? Or the start of a better world of interactive, multimedia journalism? Will the news industry live up to its responsibility to forge a well-informed public? Shepard tackles all the tough questions facing journalists, the news industry, and, indeed, anyone who understands the importance of a well-informed public in a healthy democracy. The story of Shepard’s career is the story of the news industry—and in Deadlines and Disruption, he provides peerless insight into one of the most critical issues of our time.
Release