The OECD Innovation Strategy Getting a Head Start on Tomorrow

Getting a Head Start on Tomorrow

Author: OECD

Publisher: OECD Publishing

ISBN: 9264083472

Category:

Page: 224

View: 4260

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This book provides a set of principles for fostering innovation in people (workers and consumers), in firms and in government, taking an in-depth look at the scope of innovation and how it is changing, as well as where and how it is occurring.
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Innocence Remembered, a Path to Personal and Global Healing

Author: Doris Ehrler

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 0557111838

Category: Self-Help

Page: 300

View: 7546

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INNOCENCE REMEMBERED takes you on a journey through the mysteries of human nature and discusses the key aspects of good health and healing. The main objective is to point out how beliefs of right and wrong, and guilt and innocence, affect our everyday lives on a personal, as well as on a global level. After completing this journey you will understand why we continue to create dis-ease and suffering, and how we can change course. You will feel more compassionate with yourself and others, have more trust in the benevolence of the universal forces, and create your experiences from a heightened sense of peace. INNOCENCE REMEMBERED is filled with invaluable information for anyone who is interested in personal healing, spiritual growth, ecological and economical balance, and global peace.
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The Evolutionary Biology of Flies

Author: David K. Yeates,Brian M. Wiegmann

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231501706

Category: Science

Page: 440

View: 3055

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Flies (Dipteria) have had an important role in deepening scientists'understanding of modern biology and evolution. The study of flies has figured prominently in major advances in the fields of molecular evolution, physiology, genetics, phylogenetics, and ecology over the last century. This volume, with contributions from top scientists and scholars in the field, brings together diverse aspects of research and will be essential reading for entomologists and fly researchers.
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New challenges for Head Start

hearing before the Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, first session on examining proposed authorizations for the Head Start program, and to examine the impact of the Head Start Expansion and Improvement Act of 1990, July 22, 1993

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160413940

Category: Law

Page: 98

View: 8491

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Shaping Biology

The National Science Foundation and American Biological Research, 1945-1975

Author: Toby A. Appel

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801873479

Category: Science

Page: 408

View: 1785

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Historians of the postwar transformation of science have focused largely on the physical sciences, especially the relation of science to the military funding agencies. In Shaping Biology, Toby A. Appel brings attention to the National Science Foundation and federal patronage of the biological sciences. Scientists by training, NSF biologists hoped in the 1950s that the new agency would become the federal government's chief patron for basic research in biology, the only agency to fund the entire range of biology—from molecules to natural history museums—for its own sake. Appel traces how this vision emerged and developed over the next two and a half decades, from the activities of NSF's Division of Biological and Medical Sciences, founded in 1952, through the cold war expansion of the 1950s and 1960s and the constraints of the Vietnam War era, to its reorganization out of existence in 1975. This history of NSF highlights fundamental tensions in science policy that remain relevant today: the pull between basic and applied science; funding individuals versus funding departments or institutions; elitism versus distributive policies of funding; issues of red tape and accountability. In this NSF-funded study, Appel explores how the agency developed, how it worked, and what difference it made in shaping modern biology in the United States. Based on formerly untapped archival sources as well as on interviews of participants, and building upon prior historical literature, Shaping Biology covers new ground and raises significant issues for further research on postwar biology and on federal funding of science in general. -- Margaret RossiterCornell University, author of Women Scientists in America: Before Affirmative Action, 1940-1972
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Cornell

A History, 1940–2015

Author: Glenn C. Altschuler,Isaac Kramnick

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801471885

Category: Education

Page: 544

View: 1607

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In their history of Cornell since 1940, Glenn C. Altschuler and Isaac Kramnick examine the institution in the context of the emergence of the modern research university. The book examines Cornell during the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, antiapartheid protests, the ups and downs of varsity athletics, the women's movement, the opening of relations with China, and the creation of Cornell NYC Tech. It relates profound, fascinating, and little-known incidents involving the faculty, administration, and student life, connecting them to the "Cornell idea" of freedom and responsibility. The authors had access to all existing papers of the presidents of Cornell, which deeply informs their respectful but unvarnished portrait of the university. Institutions, like individuals, develop narratives about themselves. Cornell constructed its sense of self, of how it was special and different, on the eve of World War II, when America defended democracy from fascist dictatorship. Cornell’s fifth president, Edmund Ezra Day, and Carl Becker, its preeminent historian, discerned what they called a Cornell "soul," a Cornell "character," a Cornell "personality," a Cornell "tradition"—and they called it "freedom." "The Cornell idea" was tested and contested in Cornell’s second seventy-five years. Cornellians used the ideals of freedom and responsibility as weapons for change—and justifications for retaining the status quo; to protect academic freedom—and to rein in radical professors; to end in loco parentis and parietal rules, to preempt panty raids, pornography, and pot parties, and to reintroduce regulations to protect and promote the physical and emotional well-being of students; to add nanofabrication, entrepreneurship, and genomics to the curriculum—and to require language courses, freshmen writing, and physical education. In the name of freedom (and responsibility), black students occupied Willard Straight Hall, the anti–Vietnam War SDS took over the Engineering Library, proponents of divestment from South Africa built campus shantytowns, and Latinos seized Day Hall. In the name of responsibility (and freedom), the university reclaimed them. The history of Cornell since World War II, Altschuler and Kramnick believe, is in large part a set of variations on the narrative of freedom and its partner, responsibility, the obligation to others and to one’s self to do what is right and useful, with a principled commitment to the Cornell community—and to the world outside the Eddy Street gate.
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