Neighborhood Disorganization and Social Control

Case Studies from Three Russian Cities

Author: Olga Siegmunt

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319215906

Category: Social Science

Page: 82

View: 7263

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This Brief presents a framework for understanding the role of school and neighborhood contexts in the development of self-control. Through the application of Gottfredson and Hirschi’s general theory of crime and Shaw and McKay’s social disorganization theory, the authors of this Brief examine the importance of family socialization and school and neighborhood for self-control of youth in three Russian cities, replicating results from an earlier study in Germany. The cases presented in the Brief found that family socialization is important for self-control, but it interacts with school and neighbourhood contexts. According to the study, school social control as a structural characteristic can lead to less delinquency, even if students did not develop self-control. Self-control mediates parental supervision and attachment to parents on one hand, and juvenile delinquency on the other hand. However it was not found to mediate neighbourhood context characteristics. The results of the study provide a research framework that can be applied to other international, comparative contexts. It will be of interest to researchers in Criminology and Criminal Justice, particularly Developmental and Life-Course Criminology, as well as related fields such as Public Policy and Social Work.
Release

Criminology and Criminal Justice in Russia

Past Legacies and Present Challenges

Author: Anna Gurinskaya,Mahesh K. Nalla

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351033085

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 9966

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Though criminology took root in Russia in the early 1800s and has gone through various stages of maturation—paralleling developments of the discipline in Europe and North America over the last two centuries—its contributions and presence in the field is hardly noticeable in the English-speaking world. The objective of this book is by no means to fill that void, but rather to bring together the recent developments in Russia, keeping in context its rich history of criminological legacies, traditions, and its current experiences and growth since the restructuring of Soviet Union. This book was originally published as a special issue of the International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice.
Release