Nature's Economy

A History of Ecological Ideas

Author: Donald Worster

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521468343

Category: History

Page: 505

View: 6553

Nature's Economy is a wide-ranging investigation of ecology's past. It traces the origins of the concept, discusses the thinkers who have shaped it, and shows how it in turn has shaped the modern perception of our place in nature. The book includes portraits of Linnaeus, Gilbert White, Darwin, Thoreau, and such key twentieth-century ecologists as Rachel Carson, Frederic Clements, Aldo Leopold, James Lovelock, and Eugene Odum. It concludes with a new Part VI, which looks at the directions ecology has taken most recently.
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Nature's Economy

A History of Ecological Ideas

Author: Donald Worster

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521318709

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 4482

This wide-ranging investigation of ecology's past traces the origins of the concept, discusses the thinkers who have shaped it, and shows how it in turn has shaped the modern perception of our place in nature. Donald Worster focuses on the dramatic shifts in man's view of the living world that have occurred since the eighteenth century, looking closely at the contributions of such figures as Linnaeus, Gilbert White, Darwin, and Thoreau, as well as those of the twentieth-century ecologists Frederic Clements, Aldo Leopold, and Eugene Odum. The author has written a new preface for this work, which was first published by Sierra Club Books in 1977.
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Jonathan Franzen at the End of Postmodernism

Author: Stephen J. Burn

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441191240

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 2236

Jonathan Franzen is one of the most influential, critically-significant and popular contemporary American novelists. This book is the first full-length study of his work and attempts to articulate where American fiction is headed after postmodernism. Stephen Burn provides a comprehensive analysis of each of Franzen's novels - from his early work to the major success of The Corrections - identifying key sources, delineating important narrative strategies, and revealing how Franzen's themes are reinforced by each novel's structure. Supplementing this analysis with comparisons to key contemporaries, David Foster Wallace and Richard Powers, Burn suggests how Franzen's work is indicative of the direction of experimental American fiction in the wake of the so-called end of postmodernism.
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The Island Press Bibliography of Environmental Literature

Author: Joseph Arthur Miller,Yale University. School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 396

View: 6756

Environnmental professionals have long felt the need for a practical reference work that takes an interdisciplinary approach to environmental research. This comprehensive reference work lists books, monographs, journals, conference proceedings, government reports, and other publications that contain essential information for those working to solve environmental problems--professionals, researchers, policymakers, and students.
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An Environmental History of Russia

Author: Paul Josephson,Nicolai Dronin,Aleh Cherp

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521869587

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 6387

This environmental history of the former Soviet Union explores the impact that state economic development programs had on the environment.
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The Environment and Science

Social Impact and Interaction

Author: Christian C. Young

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576079635

Category: Science

Page: 299

View: 6515

Describes the relationship between the environmental sciences and society.
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The Destruction of the Bison

An Environmental History, 1750–1920

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107717477

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 1310

The Destruction of the Bison, first published in 2000, explains the decline of the North American bison population from an estimated 30 million in 1800 to fewer than a thousand a century later. In this wide-ranging, interdisciplinary study, Andrew C. Isenberg argues that the cultural and ecological encounter between Native Americans and Euroamericans in the Great Plains was the central cause of the near-extinction of the bison. Cultural and ecological interactions created new types of bison hunters on both sides of the encounter: mounted Indian nomads and Euroamerican industrial hidemen. Together with environmental pressures these hunters nearly extinguished the bison. In the early twentieth century, nostalgia about the very cultural strife which first threatened the bison became, ironically, an important impetus to its preservation.
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The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199394474

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 4802

The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.
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Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology

Studies in the Neotropical Lowlands

Author: William L. Balée,Clark L. Erickson

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231509618

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 5389

This collection of studies by anthropologists, botanists, ecologists, and biologists is an important contribution to the emerging field of historical ecology. The book combines cutting-edge research with new perspectives to emphasize the close relationship between humans and their natural environment. Contributors examine how alterations in the natural world mirror human cultures, societies, and languages. Treating the landscape like a text, these researchers decipher patterns and meaning in the Ecuadorian Andes, Amazonia, the desert coast of Peru, and other regions in the neotropics. They show how local peoples have changed the landscape over time to fit their needs by managing and modifying species diversity, enhancing landscape heterogeneity, and controlling ecological disturbance. In turn, the environment itself becomes a form of architecture rich with historical and archaeological significance. Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology explores thousands of years of ecological history while also addressing important contemporary issues, such as biodiversity and genetic variation and change. Engagingly written and expertly researched, this book introduces and exemplifies a unique method for better understanding the link between humans and the biosphere.
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The Evolution of American Ecology, 1890-2000

Author: Sharon E. Kingsland

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801881718

Category: Science

Page: 313

View: 6118

In the 1890s, several initiatives in American botany converged. The creation of new institutions, such as the New York Botanical Garden, coincided with radical reforms in taxonomic practice and the emergence of an experimental program of research on evolutionary problems. Sharon Kingsland explores how these changes gave impetus to the new field of ecology that was defined at exactly this time. She argues that the creation of institutions and research laboratories, coupled with new intellectual directions in science, were crucial to the development of ecology as a discipline in the United States. The main concern of ecology -- the relationship between organisms and environment -- was central to scientific studies aimed at understanding and controlling the evolutionary process. Kingsland considers the evolutionary context in which ecology arose, especially neo-Lamarckian ideas and the new mutation theory, and explores the relationship between scientific research and broader theories about social progress and the evolution of human civilization. By midcentury, American ecologists were leading the rapid development of ecosystem ecology. At the same time, scientists articulated a sharp critique of modern science and society in the postwar context, foreshadowing the environmental critiques of the 1960s. As the ecosystem concept evolved, so too did debates about how human ecology should be incorporated into the biological sciences. Kingsland concludes with an examination of ecology in the modern urban environment, reflecting on how scientists are now being challenged to overcome disciplinary constraints and produce innovative responses to pressing problems. The Evolution of American Ecology, 1890--2000 offers an innovative study not only of the scientific landscape in turn-of-the-century America, but of current questions in ecological science.
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