My Year of Dirt and Water

My Year of Dirt and Water

My Year of Dirt and Water is a record of that journey. Allowed only occasional and formal visits to see her cloistered husband, Tracy teaches English, studies Japanese, and devotes herself to making pottery.

Author: Tracy Franz

Publisher: Stone Bridge Press, Inc.

ISBN: 9781611729306

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

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In February 2004, when her American husband, a recently ordained Zen monk, leaves home to train for a year at a centuries-old Buddhist monastery, Tracy Franz embarks on her own year of Zen. An Alaskan alone—and lonely—in Japan, she begins to pay attention. My Year of Dirt and Water is a record of that journey. Allowed only occasional and formal visits to see her cloistered husband, Tracy teaches English, studies Japanese, and devotes herself to making pottery. Her teacher instructs her to turn cup after cup—creating one failure after another. Past and present, East and West intertwine as Tracy is twice compelled to return home to Alaska to confront her mother’s newly diagnosed cancer and the ghosts of a devastating childhood. Revolving through the days, My Year of Dirt and Water circles hard questions: What is love? What is art? What is practice? What do we do with the burden of suffering? The answers are formed and then unformed—a ceramic bowl born on the wheel and then returned again and again to dirt and water.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Journeys of Transformation

Journeys of Transformation

(165) In a way at once forceful and humble, not formally but writing in her journal, O'Halloran makes the vow of a ... travel narrative set in Japan is Tracy Franz, My Year of Dirt and Water: Journal of a Zen Monk's Wife in Japan ...

Author: John D. Barbour

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009098830

Category: Religion

Page: 350

View: 127

Compelling exploration of how journeys to a Buddhist culture changed 30 Western writers as they explored the meaning of 'no-self'.
Categories: Religion

Hiroshima Diary

Hiroshima Diary

The Journal of a Japanese Physician, August 6-September 30, 1945 Michihiko Hachiya, M.D. ... with the art of landscape gardening and flower arranging, was introduced into Japan during medieval times by Zen Buddhist monks from China.

Author: Michihiko Hachiya, M.D.

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807873557

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 266

View: 451

The late Dr. Michihiko Hachiya was director of the Hiroshima Communications Hospital when the world's first atomic bomb was dropped on the city. Though his responsibilities in the appalling chaos of a devastated city were awesome, he found time to record the story daily, with compassion and tenderness. His compelling diary was originally published by the UNC Press in 1955, with the help of Dr. Warner Wells of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who was a surgical consultant to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and who became a friend of Dr. Hachiya. In a new foreword, John Dower reflects on the enduring importance of the diary fifty years after the bombing.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Turning Wheel

Turning Wheel

Journal of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship ... CLOUDS AND WATER by Patrick McMahon and water monks of old . ... save him from his own delusions of fame and gain . ttt For years I'd wanted to meet Daito , the 14th century Japanese Zen monk ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89076729680

Category: Buddhism

Page:

View: 759

Categories: Buddhism

The Record of Linji

The Record of Linji

A compilation of sermons, statements, and acts attributed to the great Chinese Zen master Linji Yixuan (d. 866), it serves as both an authoritative statement of Zen's basic stand-point and a central source of material for Zen koan practice ...

Author: Thomas Yuho Kirchner

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824833190

Category: Religion

Page: 520

View: 875

The Linji lu (Record of Linji) has been an essential text of Chinese and Japanese Zen Buddhism for nearly a thousand years. A compilation of sermons, statements, and acts attributed to the great Chinese Zen master Linji Yixuan (d. 866), it serves as both an authoritative statement of Zen's basic stand-point and a central source of material for Zen koan practice.One of the earliest attempts to translate this important work into English was by Sasaki Shigetsu (1882-1945), a pioneer Zen master in the U.S. and the founder of the First Zen Institute of America. At the time of his death, he entrusted the project to his wife, Ruth Fuller Sasaki. Determined to produce a definitive translation, Mrs. Sasaki assembled a team of talented young scholars, both Japanese and Western, who in the following years retranslated the text in accordance with modern research on Tang-dynasty colloquial Chinese.The materials assembled by Mrs. Sasaki and her team are finally available in the present edition of the Record of Linji. The notes, nearly six hundred in all, are almost entirely based on primary sources and thus retain their value despite the nearly forty years since their preparation.
Categories: Religion

S t Zen in Medieval Japan

S  t   Zen in Medieval Japan

Explores how Soto monks between the 13th and 16th centuries developed new forms of monastic organization and Zen instructions and new applications for Zen rituals within lay life; how these innovations helped shape rural society; and how ...

Author: William M. Bodiford

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824814827

Category: Religion

Page: 343

View: 660

Explores how Soto monks between the 13th and 16th centuries developed new forms of monastic organization and Zen instructions and new applications for Zen rituals within lay life; how these innovations helped shape rural society; and how remnants of them remain in the modern Soto school, now the lar
Categories: Religion

Daitokuji

Daitokuji

The book begins with a study of Zen portraiture at Daitokuji that reveals the precariousness of portrait likeness; the face that gazes out from an abbot's painting or statue may not be who we expect it to be or submit quietly to ...

Author: Gregory P. A. Levine

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295985402

Category: Architecture

Page: 444

View: 524

The Zen Buddhist monastery Daitokuji in Kyoto has long been revered as a cloistered meditation centre, a repository of art treasures, and a wellspring of the "Zen aesthetic." Gregory Levine's Daitokuji unsettles these conventional notions with groundbreaking inquiry into the significant and surprising visual and social identities of sculpture, painting, and calligraphy associated with this fourteenth-century monastery and its enduring monastic and lay communities. The book begins with a study of Zen portraiture at Daitokuji that reveals the precariousness of portrait likeness; the face that gazes out from an abbot's painting or statue may not be who we expect it to be or submit quietly to interpretation. By tracing the life of Daitokuji's famed statue of the chanoyu patriarch Sen no Riky-u (1522-91), which was all but destroyed by the ruler Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537-98) but survived in Rash-omon-like narratives and reconstituted sculptural forms, Levine throws light upon the contested status of images and their mytho-poetic potential. Levine then draws from the seventeenth-century journal of K-ogetsu S-ogan, Bokuseki no utsushi, to explore practices of calligraphy connoisseurship at Daitokuji and the pivotal role played by the monastery's abbots within Kyoto art circles. The book's final section explores Daitokuji's annual airings of temple treasures not merely as a practice geared toward preservation but also as a space in which different communities vie for authority over the artistic past. An epilogue follows the peripatetic journey of the monastery's scrolls of the 500 Luohan from China to Japan, to exhibition and partial sale in the West, and back to Daitokuji. Illuminating canonical and heretofore ignored works and mining a trove of documents, diaries, and modern writings, Levine argues for the plurality of Daitokuji's visual arts and the breadth of social and ritual circumstances of art making and viewing within the monastery. This diversity encourages reconsideration of stereotyped notions of "Zen art" and offers specialists and general readers alike opportunity to explore the fertile and sometimes volatile nexus of the visual arts and religious sites in Japan.
Categories: Architecture

Did Dogen Go to China

Did Dogen Go to China

In this book, Steven Heine attempts to clarify how and when Dogen's various works were composed and compiled in relation to the unfolding of Dogen's career.

Author: Steven Heine

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195305708

Category: Religion

Page: 298

View: 549

Dogen (1200-1253), the founder of the Soto Zen sect in Japan, is especially known for introducing to Japanese Buddhism many of the texts and practices that he discovered in China. Heine reconstructs the context of Dogen's travels to and reflections on China by means of a critical look at traditional sources both by and about Dogen in light of recent Japanese scholarship. While many studies emphasize the unique features of Dogen's Japanese influences, this book calls attention to the way Chinese and Japanese elements were fused in Dogen's religious vision. It reveals many new materials and insights into Dogen's main writings, including the multiple editions of the Shobogenzo, and how and when this seminal text was created by Dogen and was edited and interpreted by his disciples. This book is the culmination of the author's thirty years of research on Dogen and provides the reader with a comprehensive approach to the master's life works and an understanding of the overall career trajectory of one of the most important figures in the history of Buddhism and Asian religious thought.
Categories: Religion

The Lady and the Monk

The Lady and the Monk

An account of the author's stay in a monastery in Kyoto, Japan, in order to learn about Zen Buddhism, introduces readers to Sachiko--a well-educated English-speaking, Japanese housewife locked in a traditional marriage but drawn to the ...

Author: Pico Iyer

Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Incorporated

ISBN: UOM:39015024788567

Category: Travel

Page: 337

View: 143

An account of the author's stay in a monastery in Kyoto, Japan, in order to learn about Zen Buddhism, introduces readers to Sachiko--a well-educated English-speaking, Japanese housewife locked in a traditional marriage but drawn to the author and to Weste
Categories: Travel