Mound Sites of the Ancient South

A Guide to the Mississippian Chiefdoms

Author: Eric E. Bowne

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820345776

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

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From approximately AD 900 to 1600, ancient Mississippian culture dominated today’s southeastern United States. These Native American societies, known more popularly as moundbuilders, had populations that numbered in the thousands, produced vast surpluses of food, engaged in longdistance trading, and were ruled by powerful leaders who raised large armies. Mississippian chiefdoms built fortified towns with massive earthen structures used as astrological monuments and burial grounds. The remnants of these cities—scattered throughout the Southeast from Florida north to Wisconsin and as far west as Texas—are still visible and awe-inspiring today. This heavily illustrated guide brings these settlements to life with maps, artists’ reconstructions, photos of artifacts, and historic and modern photos of sites, connecting our archaeological knowledge with what is visible when visiting the sites today. Anthropologist Eric E. Bowne discusses specific structures at each location and highlights noteworthy museums, artifacts, and cultural features. He also provides an introduction to Mississippian culture, offering background on subsistence and settlement practices, political and social organization, warfare, and belief systems that will help readers better understand these complex and remarkable places. Sites include Cahokia, Moundville, Etowah, and many more. A Friends Fund Publication
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Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection [4 volumes]

Author: Peg A. Lamphier,Rosanne Welch

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610696034

Category: Social Science

Page: 1828

View: 9292

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This four-volume set documents the complexity and richness of women's contributions to American history and culture, empowering all students by demonstrating a more populist approach to the past. • Provides significantly more detail than typical reference works on women's history and culture, enabling readers to better appreciate the contributions of women of all socio-cultural statuses • Covers the astounding range of American women's experience, including women of various economic and racial statuses, religious affiliations, political and ideological identifications, and sexualities • Includes a significant selection of primary documents, thereby combining the educational power of secondary and primary literature to create a richer learning experience for users
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Ocmulgee National Monument

Author: Matthew Jennings

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 143965252X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 6213

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People have called the land near the Ocmulgee River in present-day central Georgia home for a long time, perhaps as many as 17,000 years, and each successive group has left its mark on the landscape. Mississippian-era people erected the towering Great Temple Mound and other large earthworks around 1,000 years ago. In the late 17th century, Ocmulgee flourished as a center of trade between the Creek Indians and their English neighbors. In the 19th century, railroads did irreparable damage to the site in the name of progress and profit, slicing through it twice. Preservation efforts bore fruit in the 1930s, when Ocmulgee National Monument was created. Since then, people from all over the world have visited Ocmulgee. They come for many reasons, but they invariably leave with a reverence for the place and the people who built it hundreds of years ago and those who have maintained it in recent decades.
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Urban American Indians: Reclaiming Native Space

Reclaiming Native Space

Author: Donna Martinez,Grace Sage,Azusa Ono

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440832080

Category: Social Science

Page: 157

View: 6053

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An outstanding resource for contemporary American Indians as well as students and scholars interested in community and ethnicity, this book dispels the myth that all American Indians live on reservations and are plagued with problems, and serves to illustrate a unique, dynamic model of community formation. • Presents information on an important topic—the growing number of American Indians living in urban areas—and sheds light on cultural problems within the United States that are largely unknown to the average American • Familiarizes readers with the policies of the U.S. federal government that created diasporas, removals, reservations, and relocations for American Indians • Encourages readers to consider fresh perspectives on urban American histories and exposes readers to a thorough analysis of colonial space, race, resistance, and cultural endurance • Written by expert scholars and civic leaders who are themselves American Indian
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Archaeology of the Mississippian Culture

A Research Guide

Author: Peter Neal Peregrine

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780815303367

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 934

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Twenty-nine collected essays represent a critical history of Shakespeare's play as text and as theater, beginning with Samuel Johnson in 1765, and ending with a review of the Royal Shakespeare Company production in 1991. The criticism centers on three aspects of the play: the love/friendship debate.
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Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 14: Southeast

Author: Raymond Fogelson,William Sturtevant

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 9780160723001

Category: History

Page: 1058

View: 4450

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The Smithsonian Institution’s Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 14, Southeast The Southeast Indians were sophisticated farmers, hunters, gatherers, and fishers occupying a diverse region extending from the Blue Ridge Mountains of the Southern Appalachians, the Carolina Piedmont, the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains, Florida, and west of the mountains to the rich valley of the southern Mississippi River. The complexity and uniqueness of the Southeast culture area is detailed in The Smithsonian Institution’s Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 14, Southeast. Its 64 chapters, written by 63 leading authorities, both anthropologists and historians, describe and illustrate the culture of each major tribe and tribal group, their history, transformation, and evolution over time. Regional and sub-regional overviews frame these and summarize the long prehistory of the area. Special topic chapters examine broad aspects of culture that characterize the Southeast and cross tribal lines. Introductory chapters explore the history of research in the area, languages spoken, and environment, and synthesize information on many small groups inadequately described in the historical literature. 508 illustrations--maps, drawings, paintings, engravings, photographs. Essays on sources, extensive bibliography, detailed index.
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