Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses

Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses

The present series Developments in Molecular Virology chose to reverse this sequence by first publishing books on the herpesviruses, followed by adenoviruses, and only now the papo vaviruses.

Author: Y. Aloni

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461320876

Category: Medical

Page: 294

View: 753

It is almost twenty years since the first DNA tumor virus meeting was held at Cold Spring Harbor. At this meeting studies on three tumor viruses were discussed: the papovaviruses, the adenoviruses and the herpesviruses. The present series Developments in Molecular Virology chose to reverse this sequence by first publishing books on the herpesviruses, followed by adenoviruses, and only now the papo vaviruses. All the DNA tumor viruses gained their original reputation by serving as model systems in animal cells for studying gene expression and gene regulation, but SV40 and polyoma have been the jewel in the crown in these studies, as A phage was for the study of prokaryotes. SV40 was the first DNA tumor virus to be completely sequenced that enabled the definition of the cis controlling elements in DNA replication and transcription. I am continuously fascinated by the organization of the SV40 and polyoma genomes. Although they contain about 5000 bp that encode for only 6 to 7 proteins, the mechanisms which regulated their gene expression are varied and include almost any other type of gene regulation found today to regulate eukaryotic genes. Just to mention two: (i) the early promoter is a classical promoter that contains the TAT A, CAAT and enhancer elements, while the late promoter is devoid of these elements, and (ii) the mRNA can be structurally and functionally monocistronic or dicistronic. This hints at the versatility in the control of gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels.
Categories: Medical

Clinical and Molecular Aspects of Neurotropic Virus Infection

Clinical and Molecular Aspects of Neurotropic Virus Infection

PAPOVAVIRUS INFECTIONS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM" JOHN E. GREENLEE Neurology Service and Neurovirology Research Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical ...

Author: Donald H. Gilden

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461316756

Category: Medical

Page: 544

View: 950

In the summer of 1984, both of us were working with Professor Yechiel Becker in the Laboratory for Molecular Virology at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical center in Jerusalem. During a discussion about the increasing number of specialized journals and monographs, Dr. Becker pointed out that none covered both the clinical and molecular aspects of neurotropic virus infections, and he urged us to develop such a book with the help of colleagues who were conducting highly-regarded research in their individual areas related to neurotropic viruses. The responses to our request were gratifying, and each contribution provided both a comprehensive clinical description of the neurologic disease produced by a specific virus and an up-to-date review of the current research in the pathogenesis of the disease, with particular attention given to molecular mechanisms. Most, but not all chapters were written by clinical neurologists who applied basic science strategies and methodologies to the question of how neurotropic viruses produce disease. other chapters were written by virologists known for their longstanding commitment and expertise in the analysis of the pathogenesis of neurotropic virus infections. Thus, this unique monograph should be valuable to all clinicians caring for patients with CNS viral diseases and to "neurovirologists" needing an update of the clinical and molecular pathogenesis of neurotropic virus infections. While this monograph was being prepared, a rapidly expanding literature indicated that the human lenteviruses, human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and HTLV-1 were highly neurotropic.
Categories: Medical

Molecular Biology of Iridoviruses

Molecular Biology of Iridoviruses

Antiviral Drugs and Interferon: The Molecular Basis of Their Activity (1983) Kohn, ... Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses (1987) Darai, G. (ed.) ...

Author: Gholamreza Darai

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461316152

Category: Medical

Page: 307

View: 762

Categories: Medical

Clinical Aspects of Interferons

Clinical Aspects of Interferons

Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses (1987) DEVELOPMENTS IN VETERINARY VIROLOGY Yechiel Becker, Series Editor Julia Hadar, Managing Editor Payne, L.N. (ed.) ...

Author: Michel Revel

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461317371

Category: Medical

Page: 366

View: 654

Categories: Medical

Herpesviruses the Immune System and AIDS

Herpesviruses  the Immune System  and AIDS

Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses (1987) Darai, G. (ed.) Molecular Biology of Iridoviruses (1990) DEVELOPMENTS IN VETERINARY VIROLOGY Payne, L.N. (ed.) ...

Author: Yechiel Becker

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461315070

Category: Medical

Page: 377

View: 153

Categories: Medical

Maedi Visna and Related Diseases

Maedi Visna and Related Diseases

Antiviral Drugs and Interferon: The Molecular Basis of Their Activity (1983) Kohn, ... Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses (1987) DEVELOPMENTS IN MEDICAL ...

Author: G. Pétursson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461316138

Category: Medical

Page: 190

View: 809

G. Petursson and Rikke Hoff-J0rgensen The concept of slow viral infections was first put forward in 1954 by Dr. Bjorn Sigurdsson, an Icelandic physician who had been studying some sheep diseases which were introduced into Iceland with the importation of a foreign breed of sheep in 1933. Sigurdsson's main criteria for defining slow infec tions were a very long initial period without clinical signs lasting months or even years following infection and a rather regular protracted, progres sive course, once clinical symptoms had appeared, usually ending in serious disease or death. Sigurdsson included in this list of slow infections maedi -visna, infectious adenomatosis of sheep, scrapie in sheep, Bittner's mam mary carcinoma and Gross' leukemia in mice. All of these diseases, except scrapie, are caused by retroviruses. The characteristics of slow infections as described above are of prac tical importance for epidemiology, diagnosis and control of these diseases. For many years the slow infections remained primarily a veterinary problem, mainly affecting sheep and goats in certain countries. In recent years, how ever, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causing acquired immunodefici ency syndrome (AIDS), has suddenly appeared in many countries of the world and brought the slow infection concept forcefully to the attention of the medical profession. The disease problems and the economic effects of slow infections of sheep and goats are increasingly recognized in various coun tries. For the reasons stated above we feel that this book should be useful for veterinarians and physicians alike.
Categories: Medical

The Molecular Basis of Viral Replication

The Molecular Basis of Viral Replication

Papillomaviruses (continued) virion size, 437 virus growth, 438 VP1 synthesis in terminally differentiated cells, 438 Papovavirus replication, ...

Author: R. Bercoff

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781468453508

Category: Medical

Page: 579

View: 956

the discovery of the "splicing" of the gene transcripts, the list would include the whole molecular genetics of the lambda bacteriophage, the notions of "promotor," "repressor," and "integration," the discovery of the reverse flow of genetic information, the very existence of oncogenes, the S'-terminal "cap" struc ture of eukaryotic mRNAs, ... Electronmicroscopy, ultracentrifugation and tissue culture were the landmarks on the way of the young science. During the past few years, however, a major (and not so silent) revolution took place: recombinant DNA technology with all its might entered in our laboratories, and restriction mapping of cloned genomes and sequencing gels have replaced plaque counting and sucrose gradients. The new techniques have made it possible to "dissect" the entire genome of a virus at the molecular level, and studies that would have been dreamt of just in the mid-seventies became the everyday experiments of our days. With new insight into the structure of viral genomes, and a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their expression, our view of viruses was bound to change: this volume bears witness to this impressive advance.
Categories: Medical

Molecular Neurovirology

Molecular Neurovirology

Greenlee, J. E. (1989) Papovavirus infections of the nervous system, in Clinical and Molecular Aspects of Neurotropic Virus Infection.

Author: Raymond P. Roos

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461204077

Category: Medical

Page: 597

View: 731

Neurovirology, the study of viral infection of the ner vous system, has evolved at the interface of three of the most rapidly unfolding fields of investigation-neurobiology, vi rology, and immunology. In all three, increasing knowledge about the molecular structure of surface receptors, how in tracellular messages are transmitted, and how diversity is regulated genetically is provided, along with the techniques of molecular biology. This promises to give us knowledge not only about the process of infection and the complex host and viral determinants of neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence, but eventually it will provide the background from which to engineer vaccines and to devise novel therapeutic agents. Animal virology and molecular biology developed quite independently from different origins. Animal virology was originally the province of the pathologists, and by clinical observation and histological preparations, they tried to ex plain the incubation period, the pathways of virus spread, and the mechanisms of disease. Molecular virology grew out of biochemistry, particularly through studies of bacterio phage, with emphasis on the physical and chemical structure of viruses and the sequences of biochemical events during the replicative cycle in cells.
Categories: Medical

Human Polyomaviruses

Human Polyomaviruses

Beginning with an historical perspective, this book covers up-to-date investigations into the molecular biology and pathogenesis of human polyomaviruses.

Author: Kamel Khalili

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780471461029

Category: Science

Page: 704

View: 217

Human Polyomaviruses Molecular and Clinical perspectives Edited by Kamel Khalili and Gerald L. Stoner Our understanding of human polyomaviruses has evolved profoundly in the last fifteen years, creating an urgent need for an updated resource. Drs. Khalili and Stoner have collected the contributions of renowned researchers and clinicians in this cutting-edge volume. Human Polyomaviruses: Molecular and Clinical Perspectives presents in-depth analyses, comprehensive reviews, and timely assessments of recent discoveries and ongoing controversies focused on these important viral pathogens. Beginning with an historical perspective, this book covers up-to-date investigations into the molecular biology and pathogenesis of human polyomaviruses. All aspects of these persistent infections are subsequently covered, including clinical issues, from diagnosis to information on treatment and drug trials. Central topics are: BK virus JC virus Simian virus 40 (SV40) and its potential as a human pathogen Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) This reference is a superb indoctrination for graduate students, medical students, high-level undergraduates, and anyone engaged in the study of DNA viruses and their molecular biology, evolution, transmission, and pathological potential.
Categories: Science

The Molecular Basis of Cell Cycle and Growth Control

The Molecular Basis of Cell Cycle and Growth Control

In Aloni Y ( ed ) : Molecular Aspects of Papovaviruses . Boston : Martinus Nijhoff Publishing , pp 1-40 . DePamphilis ML ( 1993a ) : Eukaryotic DNA ...

Author: Gary S. Stein

Publisher: Wiley-Liss

ISBN: UOM:39015046905306

Category: Science

Page: 389

View: 468

The cell cycle is a complex series of events in the growth of a cell, culminating in cell division. This volume introduces the biological problem of cell cycle control within a historical context.
Categories: Science

Immunology of Human Infection

Immunology of Human Infection

Papovavirus infections of man and their chief characteristics are listed in Table ... as tools in the study of cellular and molecular aspects of malignancy.

Author: André J. Nahmias

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781468410129

Category: Medical

Page: 603

View: 179

When we were first approached by the senior editors of this series to edit a book on interactions between the host and infectious agents, we acceptedthis offer as an exciting challenge. The only condition, readily agreed upon, was that such a book should focus on the immunology of infections in humans. Our reasons, if not biases, were severalfold. We sensed that the fields of microbiology and im munolgy, which had diverged as each was focusing on its individual search, were coming together. In agreement with the opinions expressed by Dr. Richard Krause in the Introduction, we strongly believed that the development of the immune system evolved in response to infectious agents and that the evolution of these agents was influenced in turn by the character of the host's responses. An inten sive examination of the multitude of primitive or more recently developed host defense mechanisms to determine their relative contribution to man's resistance to a given infectious agent appeared to us to be of crucial basic· and practical interest. Many immune mechanisms studied in animals were being explored in humans and it appeared timely to focus particularly on what was known about man's resistance to infectious agents, correlating this information with lessons learned from relevant experiments in animal models.
Categories: Medical

Research Grants Index

Research Grants Index

PO1CA - 15823-01 0004 Program in developmental biology ** POICA - 11405-07 0001 ... PAPOVAVIRUSES , POLYOMA VIRUS NOICP - 33311-04 Molecular basis of viral ...

Author: National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Division of Research Grants

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015072175394

Category: Medicine

Page:

View: 398

Categories: Medicine

Molecular Virology

Molecular Virology

Indeed, molecular studying phage A, a temperate phage of E. coli, biology itselflargely developed out of the work which was to lead to equally fundamental pioneer studies of Delbriick, Luria and Hershey, observations on the regulation of ...

Author: T. H. Pennington

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401095327

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 68

View: 593

1. 1 Historical development of molecular virology of effort on a limited number of phages, Viruses have occupied a central position in notably the Escherichia coli phages T2 and T4. molecular biology ever since its development as At the same time Lwoff and his colleagues were an independent discipline. Indeed, molecular studying phage A, a temperate phage of E. coli, biology itselflargely developed out of the work which was to lead to equally fundamental pioneer studies of Delbriick, Luria and Hershey, observations on the regulation of macro who realized, in the late 1930's, that bacterial molecular synthesis. viruses (bacteriophages, often abbreviated to The study of animal and plant viruses has its phages) had properties which made them origins in the latter half of the 19th century uniquely suitable as a model system for an and was largely initiated by workers in medical, attack on one of the then outstanding problems veterinary and agricultural disciplines. Many of of biology, the definition of the gene in their practical successes owe little to molecular physical and chemical terms. The favourable biology, stemming instead from those properties of these viruses include the rapidity approaches successful in combating other of their growth, their ease of assay, and the parasites, such as vector control and the availability of easily scored genetic markers. breeding of resistant varieties of plants.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Virus Induced Immunosuppression

Virus Induced Immunosuppression

B Lymphotropic Papovavirus Recently a papovavirus with a specific tropism for ... (109) The molecular basis of LPVspecific tropism for B lymphocytes is not ...

Author: Steven Specter

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781468455830

Category: Medical

Page: 500

View: 135

It is now widely acknowledged that at the beginning of this century Claude von Pirquet first pointed out that a viral disease, i. e. , measles, resulted in an anergy or depression of preexisting immune response, namely, delayed continuous hypersensitivity to PPD derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thereafter ob servations that viral infections may result in immunosuppression have been recorded by many clinicians and infectious disease investigators for six or seven decades. Nevertheless, despite sporadic reports that infectious diseases caused by viruses may result in either transient or prolonged immunodepression, investigation of this phenomenon languished until the mid-1960s, when it was pointed out that a number of experimental retroviral infections of mice with tumor viruses may result in marked immunosuppression. However, it was not until the recognition of the new epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syn drome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus and related vi ruses that acquired immunodeficiencies associated with virus infection became general knowledge among biomedical investigators as well as the lay public. A number of reviews published during the past decade or so pointed out that numerous viruses may affect humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, expanding knowledge about the nature and mechanisms of both humoral and cellular immunity and pathogenesis of viral infections has pro vided clinical and experimental models for investigating in depth how and why viruses of man and animals profoundly affect immune responses.
Categories: Medical

Molecular Aspects of Host Pathogen Interactions

Molecular Aspects of Host Pathogen Interactions

Enhancers were first discovered in the papovaviruses SV40 and polyoma , but one of the strongest is that of HCMV ( Boshart et al . , 1985 ; for review see ...

Author: Society for General Microbiology. Symposium

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521592151

Category: Medical

Page: 361

View: 547

Reports the latest advances in defining the molecular basis of infection in both bacterial and viral systems.
Categories: Medical

The Cumulative Book Index

The Cumulative Book Index

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015058373831

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 187

A world list of books in the English language.
Categories: American literature

Molecular Aspects of Anti cancer Drug Action

Molecular Aspects of Anti cancer Drug Action

Kutinova et al., (1972) demonstrated the inactivation of the infectious activity of extracellular papovavirus SV40 by cisDDP. An indication of the mechanism ...

Author:

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781349060108

Category:

Page: 404

View: 212

Categories: