Modernists Mavericks

Modernists   Mavericks

The development of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s is the story of interlinking friendships, shared experiences and artistic concerns among a number of acclaimed artists, including Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, ...

Author: Martin Gayford

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500774175

Category: Art

Page:

View: 468

The development of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s is the story of interlinking friendships, shared experiences and artistic concerns among a number of acclaimed artists, including Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Frank Auerbach, David Hockney, Bridget Riley, Gillian Ayres, Frank Bowling and Howard Hodgkin. Drawing on extensive first-hand interviews, many previously unpublished, with important witnesses and participants, the art critic Martin Gayford teases out the thread connecting these individual lives, and demonstrates how painting thrived in London against the backdrop of Soho bohemia in the 1940s and 1950s and Swinging London in the 1960s. He shows how, influenced by such different teachers as David Bomberg and William Coldstream, and aware of the work of contemporaries such as Jackson Pollock as well as the traditions of Western art from Piero della Francesca to Picasso and Matisse, the postwar painters were allied in their confidence that this ancient medium, in opposition to photography and other media, could do fresh and marvellous things. They asked the question what can painting do? and explored in their diverse ways, but with equal passion, the possibilities of paint.
Categories: Art

Modernists and Mavericks

Modernists and Mavericks

"A masterpiece, a major work of modern art history." --Wall Street Journal "Absorbing and lavishly illustrated." --New Yorker "If you are interested in modern British art, the book is unputdownable. If you are not, read it.

Author: Martin Gayford

Publisher:

ISBN: 0500295328

Category: Art

Page: 340

View: 458

The development of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s has never before been told before as a single narrative. R. B. Kitaj's proposal, made in 1976, that there was a 'substantial School of London' was essentially correct but it caused confusion because it implied that there was a movement or stylistic group at work, when in reality no one style could cover the likes of Francis Bacon and also Bridget Riley.
Categories: Art

Modernists and Mavericks

Modernists and Mavericks

Martin Gayford's masterful account of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s, illustrated by documentary photographs and the works themselves

Author: Martin Gayford

Publisher:

ISBN: 0500239770

Category: Art

Page: 340

View: 414

Martin Gayford's masterful account of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s, illustrated by documentary photographs and the works themselves
Categories: Art

Image of a Man

Image of a Man

post-war painting and was often unceremoniously lumped in with the Neo-Romantic painters of the mid-twentieth century. ... 8 Martin Gayford, Modernists & Mavericks: Bacon, Freud, Hockney and the London Painters (London: Thames & Hudson, ...

Author: Alex Belsey

Publisher: Liverpool English Texts and St

ISBN: 9781789620290

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 910

Post-war British artist Keith Vaughan (1912-77) was not only a supremely accomplished painter; he was an impassioned, eloquent writer. Image of a Man provides a comprehensive critical reading of his extraordinary journal, uncovering the attitudes and arguments that shaped and reshaped Vaughan's identity as a man and as an artist.
Categories: Art

The Phenomenology of Observation Drawing

The Phenomenology of Observation Drawing

A bigger message: Conversations with David Hockney (updated and expanded edition). London: Thames & Hudson. Gayford, M. (2019). Modernists & mavericks: Bacon, Freud, Hockney & the London painters. London: Thames & Hudson.

Author: Rose Montgomery-Whicher

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000589771

Category: Psychology

Page: 292

View: 887

Based on research, and grounded in experience, this book offers a view into the minds and hearts of people who draw. With technology at our fingertips that allows us to record and share what we see within moments, drawing seems a remarkably slow and difficult way to make an image. And yet, drawing from observation continues to be practiced by professional and amateur artists, a situation that invites the question: What does observation drawing mean in the lives of those who practice it? The central chapters of the book explicate the structures of the lived experience of drawing, weaving phenomenological reflections into a narrative about the author drawing her sister on a train. With lively accounts of drawing from hobbyists, art students, contemporary and historical artists, Montgomery-Whicher considers how the act of drawing shapes place, time, the body and relationships with the world and with others. She addresses many facets of drawing, including the connection between drawing and thinking, the range of emotions felt when drawing a person and the experience of digital drawing. Montgomery-Whicher concludes that observation drawing warrants a place in general education as well as in the education of artists. She argues that drawing will continue to thrive because it is a human practice that deepens and enriches our humanity by giving us access to keener perception, greater understanding, empathy and wonder. This book will be of interest to anyone who has ever wondered about the appeal of drawing, including professional and amateur artists, philosophers, and educators.
Categories: Psychology

Passport to Peckham

Passport to Peckham

The early history of the South London Gallery is given by Nicola Smith in her contribution to Giles Waterfield's Art ... Martin Gayford, Modernists and Mavericks: Bacon, Freud, Hockney and the London Painters (Thames & Hudson, 2018).

Author: Robert Hewison

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9781913380052

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 191

An entertaining and engaging social and cultural history of the London community of Peckham that offers lessons in urban living. “Is there life in Peckham?” asks a pop song of the 1980s. Peckham has been treated as a joke and a place to be avoided. It has been celebrated in television comedies, and denigrated for its levels of crime. It is a center for the arts and the creative industries, yet it also suffers from social deprivation and racial tension. Passport to Peckham is a guide to an unofficial part of London—social and cultural history written from the ground up. In this entertaining and engaging account, Hewison invites readers to explore Peckham’s streets and presents the portrait of a community experiencing the stresses of modern living. Old and new residents rub against each other as they try to adjust to the challenges created by urban regeneration and the more subtle process of gentrification. Artists have lived and worked in Peckham for more than a century, and now Caribbean and West African communities are adding their own flavors in terms of music, drama, poetry, and film. Focused on a few square miles, Passport to Peckham raises issues of urban policy, planning, culture, and creativity that have a far wider application. As London and other major cities recover from the COVID crisis, are there lessons in urban living to be learned from the pleasures and pains of Peckham? The answer from one of Britain’s most distinguished cultural critics is an emphatic yes.
Categories: History

Lost Girls

Lost Girls

'Euston Road painting', Martin Gayford, Modernists & Mavericks: Bacon, Freud, Hockney & the London Painters (2018), p. 50. 'With a round Renoir face', Spender, New Selected Journals, p. 586. 'The Euston Road Venus', Spurling, ...

Author: D.J. Taylor

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781472126832

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 116

A Times Book of the Year 2019 'You should not deny yourself the pleasure of reading it' Sunday Times 'A remarkable work and an important addition to the extraordinary wartime history of literary London' Literary Review Who were the Lost Girls? At least a dozen or so young women at large in Blitz-era London have a claim to this title. But Lost Girls concentrates on just four: Lys Lubbock, Sonia Brownell, Barbara Skelton and Janetta Parlade. Chic, glamorous and bohemian, as likely to be found living in a rat-haunted maisonette as dining at the Ritz, they cut a swathe through English literary and artistic life in the 1940s. Three of them had affairs with Lucian Freud. One of them married George Orwell. Another became the mistress of the King of Egypt and was flogged by him on the steps of the Royal Palace. And all of them were associated with the decade's most celebrated literary magazine, Horizon, and its charismatic editor Cyril Connolly. Lys, Sonia, Barbara and Janetta had very different - and sometimes explosive personalities - but taken together they form a distinctive part of the war-time demographic: bright, beautiful, independent-minded women with tough upbringings behind them determined to make the most of their lives in a highly uncertain environment. Theirs was the world of the buzz bomb, the cocktail party behind blackout curtains, the severed hand seen on the pavement in the Bloomsbury square, the rustle of a telegram falling through the letter-box, the hasty farewell to another half who might not ever come back, a world of living for the moment and snatching at pleasure before it disappeared. But if their trail runs through vast acreages of war-time cultural life then, in the end, it returns to Connolly and his amorous web-spinning, in which all four of them regularly featured and which sometimes complicated their emotional lives to the point of meltdown. The Lost Girls were the product of a highly artificial environment. After it came to an end - on Horizon's closure in 1950 - their careers wound on. Later they would have affairs with dukes, feature in celebrity divorce cases and make appearances in the novels of George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh, Anthony Powell and Nancy Mitford. The last of them - Janetta - died as recently as three months ago. However tiny their number, they are a genuine missing link between the first wave of newly-liberated young women of the post-Great War era and the Dionysiac free-for-all of the 1960s. Hectic, passionate and at times unexpectedly poignant, this is their story.
Categories: History

Love Lucian

Love Lucian

... Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud Martin Gayford Lucian Freud's Sketchbooks Martin Gayford Modernists and Mavericks: Bacon, Freud, Hockney and the London Painters Carolyne Larrington Be the first to know about our new releases, ...

Author: David Dawson

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500777510

Category: Art

Page: 604

View: 333

The young Lucian Freud was described by his friend Stephen Spender as totally alive, like something not entirely human, a leprechaun, a changeling child, or, if there is a male opposite, a witch. All that magnetism and brilliance is displayed in the letters assembled here, many published for the first time. From schoolboy messages to his parents, though letters to friends, lovers, and confidants, to correspondence with patrons and associates as he became established as a professional painter, they are peppered with wit, affection and irreverence. Collectively, they provide a powerful insight into his early life and art. Co-authored by David Dawson, Freuds longstanding personal assistant and now Director of the Lucian Freud Archive, and Martin Gayford, author, critic, and friend of the artist, this is the first published collection of Freuds correspondence. Reproduced in facsimile alongside reproductions of Freuds artwork, the letters are linked by a narrative that weaves them into the story of his life and relationships through his formative first three decades.
Categories: Art

This is Tomorrow

This is Tomorrow

Other titles of interest published by Thames & Hudson include: Modernists and Mavericks: Bacon, Freud, Hockney and the London Painters Martin Gayford Spirit of Place: Artists, Writers and the British Landscape Susan Owens Barbara ...

Author: Michael Bird

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500777473

Category: History

Page: 499

View: 412

In This is Tomorrow Michael Bird takes a fresh look at the long twentieth century, from the closing years of Queen Victorias reign to the turn of the millennium, through the lens of the artists who lived and worked in this ever-changing Britain. Bird examines how the rhythms of change and adaptation in art became embedded in the collective consciousness of the nation and vividly evokes the personalities who populate and drive this story, looking beyond individual careers and historical moments to weave together interconnecting currents of change that flowed through London, Glasgow, Leeds, Cornwall, the Caribbean, New York, Moscow and Berlin. From the American James McNeill Whistlers defence of his new kind of modern art against the British art establishment in the latter half of the 19th century to the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliassons melting icebergs in London, he traverses the lives of the artists that have recorded, questioned and defined our times. At the heart of this original book are the successive waves of displacement caused by global wars and persecution that conversely brought fresh ideas and new points of view to the British Isles; educational reforms opened new routes for young people from working-class backgrounds; movements of social change enabled the emergence of female artists and artists of colour; and the emergence of the mass media shaped modern modes of communication and culture. These are the ebbs and flows that Michael Bird teases out in this panoramic account of Britain and its artists in across the twentieth century.
Categories: History

Man with a Blue Scarf On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud

Man with a Blue Scarf  On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud

This is not a biography, but a series of close-ups: the artist at work and in conversation at restaurants, in taxis, and in his studio.

Author: Martin Gayford

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500770795

Category: Art

Page: 248

View: 128

“An extraordinary record of a great artist in his studio, it also describes what it feels like to be transformed into a work of art.” —ARTnews Lucian Freud (1922-2011), widely regarded as the greatest figurative painter of our time, spent seven months painting a portrait of the art critic Martin Gayford. The daily narrative of their encounters takes the reader into that most private place, the artist’s studio, and to the heart of the working methods of this modern master—both technical and subtly psychological. From this emerges an understanding of what a portrait is, but something else is also created: a portrait, in words, of Freud himself. This is not a biography, but a series of close-ups: the artist at work and in conversation at restaurants, in taxis, and in his studio. It takes one into the company of the painter for whom Picasso, Giacometti, and Francis Bacon were friends and contemporaries, as were writers such as George Orwell and W. H. Auden. The book is illustrated with many of Lucian Freud’s other works, telling photographs taken by David Dawson of Freud in his studio, and images by such great artists of the past as van Gogh and Titian who are discussed by Freud and Gayford. Full of wry observations, the book reveals the inside story of how it feels to pose for a remarkable artist and become a work of art.
Categories: Art