Modernism in the Streets

Modernism in the Streets

This collection includes early essays from and on the radical ’60s, on New York City, on literary figures from Kafka to Pamuk, and late essays on rock, hip hop, and gentrification.

Author: Marshall Berman

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781784785000

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 236

Essays tracing the intellectual life of a quintessential New York City writer and thinker Marshall Berman was one of the great urbanists and Marxist cultural critics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and his brilliant, nearly sui generis book All That Is Solid Melts Into Air is a masterpiece of the literature on modernism. But like many New York intellectuals, the essay was his characteristic form, accommodating his multifarious interests and expressing his protean, searching exuberant mind. This collection includes early essays from and on the radical ’60s, on New York City, on literary figures from Kafka to Pamuk, and late essays on rock, hip hop, and gentrification. Concluding with his last essay, completed just before his death in 2013, this book is Berman’s intellectual autobiography, tracing his career as a thinker through the way he read the “signs in the street.””
Categories: Literary Criticism

All that is Solid Melts Into Air

All that is Solid Melts Into Air

The experience of modernization -- the dizzying social changes that swept millions of people into the capitalist world -- and modernism in art, literature and architecture are brilliantly integrated in this account.

Author: Marshall Berman

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 0860917851

Category: Civilization, Modern

Page: 383

View: 760

The experience of modernization -- the dizzying social changes that swept millions of people into the capitalist world -- and modernism in art, literature and architecture are brilliantly integrated in this account.
Categories: Civilization, Modern

The Word on the Streets

The Word on the Streets

From the hard-boiled detective stories of Dashiell Hammett to the novels of Claude McKay, The Word on the Streets examines a group of writers whose experimentation with the vernacular argues for a rethinking of American modernism—one that ...

Author: Brooks E. Hefner

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813940427

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 213

From the hard-boiled detective stories of Dashiell Hammett to the novels of Claude McKay, The Word on the Streets examines a group of writers whose experimentation with the vernacular argues for a rethinking of American modernism—one that cuts across traditional boundaries of class, race, and ethnicity. The dawn of the modernist era witnessed a transformation of popular writing that demonstrated an experimental practice rooted in the language of the streets. Emerging alongside more recognized strands of literary modernism, the vernacular modernism these writers exhibited lays bare the aesthetic experiments inherent in American working-class and ethnic language, forging an alternative pathway for American modernist practice. Brooks Hefner shows how writers across a variety of popular genres—from Gertrude Stein and William Faulkner to humorist Anita Loos and ethnic memoirist Anzia Yezierska—employed street slang to mount their own critique of genteel realism and its classist emphasis on dialect hierarchies, the result of which was a form of American experimental writing that resonated powerfully across the American cultural landscape of the 1910s and 1920s.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Modernism and the Architecture of Private Life

Modernism and the Architecture of Private Life

In a survey of European paintings by men of city streets, 1913–15, Janet Wolff
found that “the masculine depiction of modernity produced a skewed account, in
which the only women visible (apart from at home in the family) were 'marginal' ...

Author: Victoria Rosner

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231507875

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 516

Modernism and the Architecture of Private Life offers a bold new assessment of the role of the domestic sphere in modernist literature, architecture, and design. Elegantly synthesizing modernist literature with architectural plans, room designs, and decorative art, Victoria Rosner's work explores the collaborations among modern British writers, interior designers, and architects in redefining the form, function, and meaning of middle-class private life. Drawing on a host of previously unexamined archival sources and works by figures such as E. M. Forster, Roger Fry, Oscar Wilde, James McNeill Whistler, and Virginia Woolf, Rosner highlights the participation of modernist literature in the creation of an experimental, embodied, and unstructured private life, which we continue to characterize as "modern."
Categories: Literary Criticism

Modern Times

Modern Times

Modern Times is about the emergence of new cultural forms and the experience of modernity over the last hundred years. All the contributions emphasise the instability of modern existence and the complex influence of psychic formation.

Author: Mica Nava

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415069327

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 975

Modern Times is about the emergence of new cultural forms and the experience of modernity over the last hundred years. All the contributions emphasise the instability of modern existence and the complex influence of psychic formation.
Categories: History

Modernism at the Barricades

Modernism at the Barricades

These straight, long, fog-choked streets—I don't like being here.” Nolde, Briefe
aus den Jahren, 38. Probst, Festschrift für Emil Nolde, 12. Quoted in Fehr, Emil
Nolde, 62. Nolde, Briefe aus den Jahren, 99. Ibid., 164. Emil Nolde, Welt und ...

Author: Stephen Eric Bronner

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231530880

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 195

Stephen Eric Bronner revisits the modernist project's groundbreaking innovations, itsexperimental imagination, and its utopian politics. Reading the artistic and intellectual achievements of the movement's leading figures against larger social, political, and cultural trends, he follows the rise of a flawed yet salient effort at liberation and its confrontation with modernity. Modernism at the Barricades features chapters on expressionism, futurism, surrealism, and revolutionary art and includes fresh perspectives on the work of Arnold Schoenberg, Wassily Kandinsky, and Emil Nolde, among others. The volume illuminates an international avant garde intent on resisting bureaucracy, standardization, scientific rationality, and the increasing commodification of mass culture. Modernists sought new ways of feeling, new forms of expression, and new possibilities of experience while seeking to refashion society. Liberation was their aim, along with the invigoration of daily life—yet their process entangled political resistance with the cultural. Exploring both the political responsibility of the artist and the manipulation of authorial intention, Bronner reconfigures the modernist movement for contemporary progressive purposes and offers insight into the problems still complicating cultural politics. He ultimately reasserts the political dimension of developments often understood in purely aesthetic terms and confronts the self-indulgence and political irresponsibility of certain so-called modernists today. The result is a long overdue reinterpretation and rehabilitation of the modernist legacy for a new age.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Modernism in the Metrocolony

Modernism in the Metrocolony

While literary modernism is often associated with Euro-American metropolises such as London, Paris or New York, this book considers the place of the colonial city in modernist fiction.

Author: Caitlin Vandertop

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108875783

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 167

While literary modernism is often associated with Euro-American metropolises such as London, Paris or New York, this book considers the place of the colonial city in modernist fiction. From the streets of Dublin to the shop-houses of Singapore, and from the botanical gardens of Bombay to the suburbs of Suva, the monumental landscapes of British colonial cities aimed to reinforce empire's universalising claims, yet these spaces also contradicted and resisted the impositions of an idealised English culture. Inspired by the uneven landscapes of the urban British empire, a group of twentieth-century writers transformed the visual incongruities and anachronisms on display in the city streets into sources of critique and formal innovation. Showing how these writers responded to empire's metrocolonial complexities and built legacies, Modernism in the Metrocolony traces an alternative, peripheral history of the modernist city.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Modernism and the Post Colonial

Modernism and the Post Colonial

... of the voyage in that was a feature of increased migrancy, as well as imperial
expansion, and a catalyst for modernism. ... packed out into the streets, not by the
natural increase of our own population, but by the off-scum of Europe' (quoted in
 ...

Author: Peter Childs

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441135537

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 162

View: 660

This book considers the shifts in aesthetic representation over the period 1885-1930 that coincide both with the rise of literary Modernism and imperialism's high point. If it is no coincidence that the rise of the novel accompanied the expansion of empire in the eighteenth-century, then the historical conditions of fiction as the empire waned are equally pertinent. Peter Childs argues that modernist literary writing should be read in terms of its response and relationship to events overseas and that it should be seen as moving towards an emergent post-colonialism instead of struggling with a residual colonial past. Beginning by offering an analysis of the generational and gender conflict that spans art and empire in the period, Childs moves on to examine modernism's expression of a crisis of belief in relation to subjectivity, space, and time. Finally, he investigates the war as a turning point in both colonial relations and aesthetic experimentation. Each of the core chapters focuses on one key writer and discuss a range of others, including: Conrad, Lawrence, Kipling, Eliot, Woolf, Joyce, Conan Doyle and Haggard.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Modernism on Fleet Street

Modernism on Fleet Street

... Called up to illustrate Macaulay ' s ( slightly qualified ) observation that , “ We [
the public ] are , in a sense , always that eager , silly , gaping public of the streets
” ( 30 ) , the vignette seems to offer a denigration of the public typical of its age .

Author: Patrick Collier

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754653080

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 257

View: 886

Patrick Collier brings an impressive array of archival research to the first full-length study of Modernism's relationship to the newspaper press. His discussions of T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Rose Macaulay show how their work participated in contemporary debates about journalism. His book is a major contribution to our understanding of the role journalism played in establishing the careers of Modernist writers.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Archaism Modernism and the Art of Paul Manship

Archaism  Modernism  and the Art of Paul Manship

... “this one colossal man seems to relegate into nothingness everything that
surrounds him: the trees, the houses, the streets with their busy throngs” (“The
Revival of Plastic Art in Germany,” Cosmopolitan Magazine 45|September 1908]:
342).

Author: Susan Rather

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292785960

Category: Art

Page: 284

View: 272

Archaism, an international artistic phenomenon from early in the twentieth century through the 1930s, receives its first sustained analysis in this book. The distinctive formal and technical conventions of archaic art, especially Greek art, particularly affected sculptors—some frankly modernist, others staunchly conservative, and a few who, like American Paul Manship, negotiated the distance between tradition and modernity. Susan Rather considers the theory, practice, and criticism of early twentieth-century sculpture in order to reveal the changing meaning and significance of the archaic in the modern world. To this end—and against the background of Manship’s career—she explores such topics as the archaeological resources for archaism, the classification of the non-Western art of India as archaic, the interest of sculptors in modem dance (Isadora Duncan and Ruth St. Denis), and the changing critical perception of archaism. Rather rejects the prevailing conception of archaism as a sterile and superficial academic style to argue its initial importance as a modernist mode of expression. The early practitioners of archaism—including Aristide Maillol, André Derain, and Constantin Brancusi—renounced the rhetorical excess, overrefined naturalism, and indirect techniques of late nineteenth-century sculpture in favor of nonnarrative, stylized and directly carved works, for which archaic Greek art offered an important example. Their position found implicit support in the contemporaneous theoretical writings of Emmanuel Löwy, Wilhelm Worringer, and Adolf von Hildebrand. The perceived relationship between archaic art and tradition ultimately compromised the modernist authority of archaism and made possible its absorption by academic and reactionary forces during the 1910s. By the 1920s, Paul Manship was identified with archaism, which had become an important element in the aesthetic of public sculpture of both democratic and totalitarian societies. Sculptors often employed archaizing stylizations as ends in themselves and with the intent of evoking the foundations of a classical art diminished in potency by its ubiquity and obsolescence. Such stylistic archaism was not an empty formal exercise but an urgent affirmation of traditional values under siege. Concurrently, archaism entered the mainstream of fashionable modernity as an ingredient in the popular and commercial style known as Art Deco. Both developments fueled the condemnation of archaism—and of Manship, its most visible exemplar—by the avant-garde. Rather’s exploration of the critical debate over archaism, finally, illuminates the uncertain relationship to modernism on the part of many critics and highlights the problematic positions of sculpture in the modernist discourse.
Categories: Art

The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism

The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism

the arcade - a space of commerce, of commodities; but soon they, too, move
through them as shoppers. They take refuge from the street under this protective
glass. It sheathes them, like couture. Paris fashion remakes both Jaky/Jacques
and ...

Author: Walter Kalaidjian

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139827140

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 494

The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview of American literary modernism from 1890 to 1939. These original essays by twelve distinguished scholars of international reputation offer critical overviews of the major genres, literary culture, and social contexts that define the current state of Modern American literature and cultural studies. Among the diverse topics covered are nationalism, race, gender and the impact of music and visual arts on literary modernism, as well as overviews of the achievements of American modernism in fiction, poetry and drama. The book concludes with a chapter on modern American criticism. An essential reference guide to the field, the Companion offers readers a chronology of key events and publication dates covering the first half of the twentieth century in the United States, and a bibliography of further reading organized by chapter topics.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Democracy is in the Streets

 Democracy is in the Streets

Perhaps the most sophisticated theoretical expression of the modernist impulse
behind the radical democratic politics of ... like Lionel Trilling , who , after
witnessing the Columbia student uprising of 1968 , decried " modernism in the
streets .

Author: James E. Miller

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

ISBN: UCSC:32106008752633

Category: College students

Page: 431

View: 817

A vivid re-creation of the turbulent history of the people and ideas that shaped the Left in America during the 1960s.
Categories: College students

Topographies of Japanese Modernism

Topographies of Japanese Modernism

Modernist writings are formally characterized by the fragmentation of grammar
and narrative and by the mixing of multiple ... interior spaces, modernism moves
out onto the streets, beyond the boundaries of the private and domestic worlds
and ...

Author: Seiji M. Lippit

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231500685

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 299

What happens when a critique of modernity—a "revolt against the traditions of the Western world"—is situated within a non-European context, where the concept of the modern has been inevitably tied to the image of the West? Seiji M. Lippit offers the first comprehensive study in English of Japanese modernist fiction of the 1920s and 1930s. Through close readings of four leading figures of this movement— Akutagawa, Yokomitsu, Kawabata, and Hayashi—Lippit aims to establish a theoretical and historical framework for the analysis of Japanese modernism. The 1920s and 1930s witnessed a general sense of crisis surrounding the institution of literature, marked by both the radical politicization of literary practice and the explosion of new forms of cultural production represented by mass culture. Against this backdrop, this study traces the heterogeneous literary topographies of modernist writings. Through an engagement with questions of representation, subjectivity, and ideology, it situates the disintegration of literary form in these texts within the writers' exploration of the fluid borderlines of Japanese modernity.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Streetwalking the Metropolis Women the City and Modernity

Streetwalking the Metropolis   Women  the City and Modernity

Women, the City and Modernity Deborah L. Parsons ... the identification of her as
a prostitute in terms of outward appearance and subverts the implications of a
woman looking at a man in the night street — two categorizing motifs contradict.

Author: Deborah L. Parsons

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191584107

Category: Cities and towns in literature

Page: 256

View: 832

Can there be a flaneuse, and what form might she take? This is the central question of Streetwalking the Metropolis, an important contribution to ongoing debates on the city and modernity in which Deborah Parsons re-draws the gendered map of urban modernism. Assessing the cultural and literary history of the concept of the flaneur, the urban observer/writer traditionally gendered as masculine, the author advances critical space for the discussion of a female 'flaneuse', focused around a range of women writers from the 1880's to World War Two. Cutting across period boundaries, this wide-ranging study offers stimulating accounts of works by writers including Amy Levy, Dorothy Richardson, Virginia Woolf, Rosamund Lehmann, Jean Rhys, Janet Flanner, Djuna Barnes, Anais Nin, Elizabeth Bowen and Doris Lessing, highlighting women's changing relationship with the social and psychic spaces of the city, and drawing attention to the ways in which the perceptions and experiences of the street are translated into the dynamics of literary texts.
Categories: Cities and towns in literature

Metromarxism

Metromarxism

Berman never forgot what happened there , the destruction and devastation , the
evil forces released in the name of modernity . ... one the great Columbia critic
and Berman's old tutor , Lionel Trilling once called “ modernism in the streets .

Author: Andy Merrifield

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415933498

Category: Social Science

Page: 212

View: 198

"Metromarxism" discusses Marxism's relationship with the city from the 1850s to the present by way of biographical chapters on figures from the Marxist tradition, including Marx, Walter Benjamin, Guy Debord, and David Harvey. Each chapter combines interesting biographical anecdotes with an accessible analysis of each individual's contribution to an always-transforming Marxist theory of the city. He suggests that the interplay between the city as center of economic and social life and its potential for progressive change generated a major corpus of work. That work has been key in advancing progressive political and social transformations.
Categories: Social Science

Late Modernism

Late Modernism

Modernism. O. n April 21, 1964, Andy Warhol held a public party at the Factory,
his fifth-floor art studio on Lexington ... No longer an academic question or a
highbrow style, modern art had poured out onto the streets and had become an
official ...

Author: Robert Genter

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812200072

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 137

In the thirty years after World War II, American intellectual and artistic life changed as dramatically as did the rest of society. Gone were the rebellious lions of modernism—Joyce, Picasso, Stravinsky—and nearing exhaustion were those who took up their mantle as abstract expressionism gave way to pop art, and the barren formalism associated with the so-called high modernists wilted before the hothouse cultural brew of the 1960s. According to conventional thinking, it was around this time that postmodernism with its characteristic skepticism and relativism was born. In Late Modernism, historian Robert Genter remaps the landscape of American modernism in the early decades of the Cold War, tracing the combative debate among artists, writers, and intellectuals over the nature of the aesthetic form in an age of mass politics and mass culture. Dispensing with traditional narratives that present this moment as marking the exhaustion of modernism, Genter argues instead that the 1950s were the apogee of the movement, as American practitioners—abstract expressionists, Beat poets, formalist critics, color-field painters, and critical theorists, among others—debated the relationship between form and content, tradition and innovation, aesthetics and politics. In this compelling work of intellectual and cultural history Genter presents an invigorated tradition of late modernism, centered on the work of Kenneth Burke, Ralph Ellison, C. Wright Mills, David Riesman, Jasper Johns, Norman Brown, and James Baldwin, a tradition that overcame the conservative and reactionary politics of competing modernist practitioners and paved the way for the postmodern turn of the 1960s.
Categories: History

Along the Streets of Bronzeville

Along the Streets of Bronzeville

... Gwendolyn Brooks published Street in Bronzeville, and St. Clair Drake and
Horace Cayton published Black Metropolis ... “Realism, Modernism, and
Naturalism,” covering the years from 1940 to 1960, “when black authors sought to
adapt the ...

Author: Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252095108

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 688

Along the Streets of Bronzeville examines the flowering of African American creativity, activism, and scholarship in the South Side Chicago district known as Bronzeville during the period between the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. Poverty stricken, segregated, and bursting at the seams with migrants, Bronzeville was the community that provided inspiration, training, and work for an entire generation of diversely talented African American authors and artists who came of age during the years between the two world wars. In this significant recovery project, Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach investigates the institutions and streetscapes of Black Chicago that fueled an entire literary and artistic movement. She argues that African American authors and artists--such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, painter Archibald Motley, and many others--viewed and presented black reality from a specific geographic vantage point: the view along the streets of Bronzeville. Schlabach explores how the particular rhythms and scenes of daily life in Bronzeville locations, such as the State Street "Stroll" district or the bustling intersection of 47th Street and South Parkway, figured into the creative works and experiences of the artists and writers of the Black Chicago Renaissance.
Categories: Social Science

We Have Never Been Postmodern

We Have Never Been Postmodern

... film-maker, Kureishi has raised the bar on critical writing. In the so-called '
postmodern condition' of the 1980s and 1990s what I see as Kureishi's 'low
modernism', or what Marshall Berman labelled 'modernism in the streets' (
Berman 2010), ...

Author: Steve Redhead

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748688975

Category: Art

Page: 192

View: 303

This book sets out a variety of reasons why we should move away from seeing the recent era as 'postmodern' and our culture as 'postmodernist' through a series of analyses of contemporary culture.
Categories: Art

Modernism and the Marginal Woman

Modernism and the Marginal Woman

But as soon as she put the light out , the fear was with her again - - and now it
was like a long street where she walked ... to that of Anna and Julia , from the
family circle of home life , shuttered out of the houses and left alone in the streets
.

Author: Mary Lou Emery

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105025690764

Category: Colonies in literature

Page: 628

View: 683

Categories: Colonies in literature

Dancing in the Streets

Dancing in the Streets

Sass, Louis A. Madness and Modernism: Sanity in the Light of Modern Art,
Literature, and Thought. New York: Basic Books, 1992. Sawyer, Deborah F.
Women and Religion in the First Christian Centuries. London and New York:
Routledge, ...

Author: Barbara Ehrenreich

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 9781429904650

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 188

From the bestselling social commentator and cultural historian comes Barbara Ehrenreich's fascinating exploration of one of humanity's oldest traditions: the celebration of communal joy In the acclaimed Blood Rites, Barbara Ehrenreich delved into the origins of our species' attraction to war. Here, she explores the opposite impulse, one that has been so effectively suppressed that we lack even a term for it: the desire for collective joy, historically expressed in ecstatic revels of feasting, costuming, and dancing. Ehrenreich uncovers the origins of communal celebration in human biology and culture. Although sixteenth-century Europeans viewed mass festivities as foreign and "savage," Ehrenreich shows that they were indigenous to the West, from the ancient Greeks' worship of Dionysus to the medieval practice of Christianity as a "danced religion." Ultimately, church officials drove the festivities into the streets, the prelude to widespread reformation: Protestants criminalized carnival, Wahhabist Muslims battled ecstatic Sufism, European colonizers wiped out native dance rites. The elites' fear that such gatherings would undermine social hierarchies was justified: the festive tradition inspired French revolutionary crowds and uprisings from the Caribbean to the American plains. Yet outbreaks of group revelry persist, as Ehrenreich shows, pointing to the 1960s rock-and-roll rebellion and the more recent "carnivalization" of sports. Original, exhilarating, and deeply optimistic, Dancing in the Streets concludes that we are innately social beings, impelled to share our joy and therefore able to envision, even create, a more peaceable future. "Fascinating . . . An admirably lucid, level-headed history of outbreaks of joy from Dionysus to the Grateful Dead."—Terry Eagleton, The Nation
Categories: History