Mexico illustrated, 1920-1950

Author: Salvador Albiñana

Publisher: Rm Verlag

ISBN: 9788492480876

Category: Design

Page: 376

View: 1926

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The most important study ever published on modern illustrated books in Mexico, "Mexico Illustrated 1920-1950" explores the illustration and poster work of great Mexican artists from the first half of the twentieth century, offering a selection of the finest illustrations from books, magazines and posters published in this era. Reflecting the range of aesthetic, pedagogical, political and propagandistic trends that held sway in Mexico at the time, it contains works relating to the Mexican Revolution, illustrations made for socialist writings and art drawn from novels and children's books, along with a great many contributions to magazines that oscillated between the avant garde and the construction of a new vision of Mexico. Among the artists included here are some of Mexico's greatest artistic talents--Diego Rivera, Jos xE9; Clemente Orozco, Rufino Tamayo, David Alfaro Siqueiros--along with lesser-known artists such as Ram xF3;n Alva de la Canal, Jean Charlot, Miguel Covarrubias, Dr. Atl, Gabriel Fern xE1;ndez Ledesma and Leopoldo M xE9;ndez. With more than 300 illustrations, "Mexico Illustrated" includes essays by Juan Manuel Bonet, Mercurio L xF3;pez Casillas, Dafne Cruz and Marina Garone, who elucidate the relations between Mexico and the European avant-garde movements, the socialist aesthetic, children's literature, graphic design and the cartography of postrevolutionary Mexico.
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Bernard Plossu in Mexico

Vamonos!: 1965-1966, 1970, 1974, 1981

Author: Bernard Plossu,Salvador Albiñana,Juan Garcia de Oteyza

Publisher: Aperture

ISBN: 9781597112765

Category: Photography

Page: 336

View: 6803

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For more than fifteen years, French photographer Bernard Plossu took extended trips to Mexico to photograph people, landscapes, and a culture in flux. ¡Vámanos! Bernard Plossu in México captures the bohemian adventure of this travelers four journeys, the first in 196566 and the last in 1981. His black-and-white and color images have transfixed generations of young people in France, who cherish him in the way young Americans celebrate Jack Kerouac. Plossus romantic vision encompasses coquettish women, peasants at work, fog-wrapped trails in the jungle, and waves lapping at sandy beaches. Yet Plossu is also aware of poverty and the challenges facing a modernizing society, and his photographs capture the nobility of all his subjects. Along with more than three hundred photographs, organized into chapters representing each of his Mexican journeys, this first compilation of Plossus Mexican work includes an essay by prominent French photo editor Claude Nori that highlights Plossus vagabond spirit. Additional commentaries are provided by renowned writers, including the books editor, Salvador Albiñana, and Emmanuel Guigon, Francisco Salinas, Alfonso Morales, and José Agustín.
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2017

Author: Mariana Aguirre,Rosa Sarabia,Renée M. Silverman,Ricardo Vasconcelos

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110527839

Category: Art

Page: 570

View: 7941

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Futurism Studies in its canonical form has followed in the steps of Marinetti's concept of Futurisme mondial, according to which Futurism had its centre in Italy and a large number of satellites around Europe and the rest of the globe. Consequently, authors of textbook histories of Futurism focus their attention on Italy, add a chapter or two on Russia and dedicate next to no attention to developments in other parts of the world. Futurism Studies tends to sees in Marinetti's movement the font and mother of all subsequent avant-gardes and deprecates the non-European variants as mere 'derivatives'. Vol. 7 of the International Yearbook of Futurism Studies will focus on one of these regions outside Europe and demonstrate that the heuristic model of centre – periphery is faulty and misleading, as it ignores the originality and inventiveness of art and literature in Latin America. Futurist tendencies in both Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries may have been, in part, 'influenced' by Italian Futurism, but they certainly did no 'derive' from it. The shift towards modernity took place in Latin America more or less in parallel to the economic progress made in the underdeveloped countries of Europe. Italy and Russia have often been described as having originated Futurism because of their backwardness compared to the industrial powerhouses England, Germany and France. According to this narrative, Spain and Portugal occupied a position of semi-periphery. They had channelled dominant cultural discourses from the centre nations into the colonies. However, with the rise of modernity and the emergence of independence movements, cultural discourses in the colonies undertook a major shift. The revolt of the European avant-garde against academic art found much sympathy amongst Latin American artists, as they were engaged in a similar battle against the canonical discourses of colonial rule. One can therefore detect many parallels between the European and Latin American avant-garde movements. This includes the varieties of Futurism, to which Yearbook 2017 will be dedicated. In Europe, the avant-garde had a complex relationship to tradition, especially its 'primitivist' varieties. In Latin America, the avant-garde also sought to uncover and incorporate alternative, i.e. indigenous traditions. The result was a hybrid form of art and literature that showed many parallels to the European avant-garde, but also had other sources of inspiration. Given the large variety of indigenous cultures on the American continent, it was only natural that many heterogeneous mixtures of Futurism emerged there. Yearbook 2017 explores this plurality of Futurisms and the cultural traditions that influenced them. Contributions focus on the intertextual character of Latin American Futurisms, interpret works of literature and fine arts within their local setting, consider modes of production and consumption within each culture as well as the forms of interaction with other Latin American and European centres. 14 essays locate Futurism within the complex network of cultural exchange, unravel the Futurist contribution to the complex interrelations between local and the global cultures in Latin America and reveal the dynamic dialogue as well as the multiple forms of cross-fertilization that existed amongst them.
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Acrobatic Modernism from the Avant-Garde to Prehistory

Author: Jed Rasula

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192570722

Category: Music

Page: 496

View: 7530

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This is a book about artistic modernism contending with the historical transfigurations of modernity. As a conscientious engagement with modernity's restructuring of the lifeworld, the modernist avant-garde raised the stakes of this engagement to programmatic explicitness. But even beyond the vanguard, the global phenomenon of jazz combined somatic assault with sensory tutelage. Jazz, like the new technologies of modernity, re-calibrated sensory ratios. The criterion of the new as self-making also extended to names: pseudonyms and heteronyms. The protocols of modernism solicited a pragmatic arousal of bodily sensation as artistic resource, validating an acrobatic sensibility ranging from slapstick and laughter to the pathos of bereavement. Expressivity trumped representation. The artwork was a diagram of perception, not a mimetic rendering. For artists, the historical pressures of altered perception provoked new models, and Ezra Pound's slogan 'Make It New' became the generic rallying cry of renovation. The paradigmatic stance of the avant-garde was established by Futurism, but the discovery of prehistoric art added another provocation to artists. Paleolithic caves validated the spirit of all-over composition, unframed and dynamic. Geometric abstraction, Constructivism and Purism, and Surrealism were all in quest of a new mythology. Making it new yielded a new pathos in the sensation of radical discrepancy between futurist striving and remotest antiquity. The Paleolithic cave and the USSR emitted comparable siren calls on behalf of the remote past and the desired future. As such, the present was suffused with the pathos of being neither, but subject to both.
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Farewell to Surrealism

The Dyn Circle in Mexico

Author: Annette Leddy,Donna Conwell

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 1606061186

Category: Art

Page: 71

View: 3808

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This volume accompanies the exhibition Farewell to Surrealism: The Dyn Circle in Mexico, held at the Getty Research Institute, 2 October 2012-17 February 2013.
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The Wonder of American Toys, 1920-1950

Author: Charles Dee Sharp

Publisher: Collectors Press, Inc.

ISBN: 1888054700

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 336

View: 854

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The Wonder of American Toys reflects not only the toys of perhaps the most formative era of American history, but what they meant to the children who played with them and to the society that produced them.
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Ghosts of the Revolution in Mexican Literature and Visual Culture

Revisitations in Modern and Contemporary Creative Media

Author: Erica Segre

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 316

View: 9254

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The official centenary commemorating the Mexican Revolution of 1910 led to this specially commissioned volume, which explores notions such as 'revisitation', haunting and memorialization through a detailed examination of Mexican art, photography, film, narrative fiction, periodicals, travel-testimonies and poetry.
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Mexico and Modern Printmaking

A Revolution in the Graphic Arts, 1920 to 1950

Author: John W. Ittmann,Innis H. Shoemaker

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300120042

Category: Art

Page: 289

View: 5080

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Mexico witnessed an exciting revival of printmaking alongside its better-known public mural program in the decades after the 1910–20 revolution. Major artists such as José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and Rufino Tamayo produced numbers of prints that furthered the social and political reforms of the revolution and helped develop a uniquely Mexican cultural identity. This groundbreaking book is the first to undertake an in-depth examination of these prints, the vital contributions Mexico’s printmakers made to modern art, and their influence on coming generations of foreign artists. Along with a thorough discussion of the printmaking practices of Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros, Tamayo, and others, the book features some 300 handsomely illustrated prints––many previously unpublished. Essays by distinguished scholars investigate the dynamic cultural exchange between Mexico and other countries at this time. They analyze the work of such Mexican artists as Emilio Amero and Jesús Escobedo, who traveled abroad, and such international artists as Elizabeth Catlett and Jean Charlot, who came to Mexico. They also discuss the important roles of the Taller de Gráfica Popular, a flourishing print workshop founded in Mexico City in 1937, and the Weyhe Gallery in New York, which published and distributed prints by many of these artists during the 1920s and 1930s. Together, the prints and essays tell the fascinating history of Mexico’s graphic-arts movement in the first half of the 20th century.
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