Mentalizing and Epistemic Trust

Mentalizing and Epistemic Trust

This is an open access title available under the terms of a [CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International] licence.

Author: Robbie Duschinsky

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198871187

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 991

This is an open access title available under the terms of a [CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International] licence. It is free to read at Oxford Clinical Psychology Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. The theory of mentalizing and epistemic trust introduced by Peter Fonagy and colleagues at the Anna Freud Centre has been an important perspective on mental health and illness. Mentalizing and Epistemic Trust is the first comprehensive account and evaluation of this perspective. The book explores twenty primary concepts that organize the contributions of Fonagy and colleagues: adaptation, aggression, the alien self, culture, disorganized attachment, epistemic trust, hypermentalizing, reflective function, the P factor, pretend mode, the primary unconscious, psychic equivalence, mental illness, mentalizing, mentalization-based therapy, non-mentalizing, the self, sexuality, the social environment, and teleological mode. The biographical and social context of the development of these ideas is examined. The book also specifies the current strengths and limitations of the theory of mentalizing and epistemic trust, with attention to the implications for both clinicians and researchers. This book will be of interest to historians of the human sciences, developmental psychologists, and clinicians interested in taking a broader perspective on psychological theory and concepts.
Categories: History

Mentalizing and Epistemic Trust

Mentalizing and Epistemic Trust

The main theories and concepts in the work of Fonagy and colleagues are placed in an historical and social context, and changes occurring in the present moment are thoroughly appraised.

Author: Robbie Duschinsky

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191914193

Category: Mentalization Based Therapy

Page:

View: 905

'Mentalising and Epistemic Trust' offers a critical overview of MBT, exploring its roots in attachment theory, and more broadly. The main theories and concepts in the work of Fonagy and colleagues are placed in an historical and social context, and changes occurring in the present moment are thoroughly appraised.
Categories: Mentalization Based Therapy

The Routledge Handbook of Attachment Theory

The Routledge Handbook of Attachment  Theory

From a mentalising perspective, it can be predicted that the epistemic trust (meaning the particular trust required for someone to learn from another, entailing a confidence in the 'teacher's' reliability and intentions) and the ability ...

Author: Paul Holmes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317647157

Category: Psychology

Page: 188

View: 418

The Routledge Handbook of Attachment: Theory provides a broadly based introduction to attachment theory and associated areas, written in an accessible style by experts from around the world. The book covers the basic theories of attachment and discusses the similarities and differences of the two predominant schools of attachment theory. The book provides an overview of current developments in attachment theory, explaining why it is important not only to understanding infant and early child development but also to adult personality and the care we provide to our children. The Routledge Handbook of Attachment: Theory provides detailed descriptions of the leading schools of attachment theory as well as discussions of this potentially confusing and contentious area, and includes a chapter on the neuropsychological basis of attachment. The book also examines other domains and diagnoses that can be confused with issues of attachment and assesses contexts when different approaches may be more suitable. Providing a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to the theories of attachment, The Routledge Handbook of Attachment: Theory is an indispensable guide for professionals working with children and families in community and court-based settings, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers, clinicians in training and students.
Categories: Psychology

An Existential Approach to Interpersonal Trauma

An Existential Approach to Interpersonal Trauma

Non-mentalising and autonomic modes of mentalising can lead people to subjectively experience everyday relational ... For me, Fonagy and colleagues', formulation of epistemic trust and mentalisation provides an alternative articulation ...

Author: Marc Boaz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000556377

Category: Psychology

Page: 246

View: 388

An Existential Approach to Interpersonal Trauma provides a new existential framework for understanding the experiences of interpersonal trauma building on reflections from Marc Boaz’s own personal history, clinical insight and research. The book suggests that psychology, psychotherapy and existentialism do not recognise the significance of the existential movements that occur in traumatic confrontations with reality. By considering what people find at the limits and boundaries of human experiencing, Boaz describes the ways in which they can disillusion and re-illusion themselves, and how this becomes incorporated into their modes of existing in the world and in relation to others. In incorporating the experience of trauma into the way people live – all the existential horror, terror and liberation contained within it – Boaz invites them to embrace an expansive ethic of (re)(dis)covery. This ethic recognises the ambiguity and spectrality of interpersonal trauma, and expands the horizons of our human relationships. The book provides an important basis for professionals wanting to work existentially with interpersonal trauma and for people wanting to deepen their understanding of the trauma they have experienced.
Categories: Psychology

A Clinical Guide to Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

A Clinical Guide to Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

Epistemic trust develops in the context of sensitive responses from our attachment figures in early childhood and leads to neural development. Thus, a secure environment and attachment context fosters robust mentalising and emotional ...

Author: Deborah Abrahams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351138567

Category: Psychology

Page: 324

View: 199

A Clinical Guide to Psychodynamic Psychotherapy serves as an accessible and applied introduction to psychodynamic psychotherapy. The book is a resource for psychodynamic psychotherapy that gives helpful and practical guidelines around a range of patient presentations and clinical dilemmas. It focuses on contemporary issues facing psychodynamic psychotherapy practice, including issues around research, neuroscience, mentalising, working with diversity and difference, brief psychotherapy adaptations and the use of social media and technology. The book is underpinned by the psychodynamic competence framework that is implicit in best psychodynamic practice. The book includes a foreword by Prof. Peter Fonagy that outlines the unique features of psychodynamic psychotherapy that make it still so relevant to clinical practice today. The book will be beneficial for students, trainees and qualified clinicians in psychotherapy, psychology, counselling, psychiatry and other allied professions.
Categories: Psychology

Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice

Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice

EPISTEMIC. TRUST. How does this proposed model of mental disorder fit within our wider thinking about mentalizing and ... that epistemic trust—defined as openness to the reception of social communication that is personally relevant and ...

Author: Anthony W. Bateman

Publisher: American Psychiatric Pub

ISBN: 9781615372508

Category: Medical

Page: 470

View: 104

This new edition of Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice reflects a vibrant field undergoing development along a number of dimensions important for mental health. As evidenced by the number of experts contributing chapters that focus on specialized approaches to mentalization-based treatment (MBT), the range of mental disorders for which this therapy has proved helpful has substantially increased, and now includes psychosis. Second, the range of contexts within which the approach has been shown to be of value has grown. MBT has been found to be useful in outpatient and community settings, and, more broadly, with children, adolescents, couples, and families, and the social contexts where they are found, such as in schools and even prisons. Finally, the framework has been shown to be generalizable to an understanding of the social context of mental health. The model advanced in this book goes beyond an understanding of the development of mentalizing and aims to provide an understanding of its role in a range of social processes.Key concepts, themes, and approaches clearly articulated throughout the book include the following: Mentalizing is a transdiagnostic concept applicable to a range of mental health conditions, including trauma, personality disorders, eating disorders, depression, substance use disorder, and psychosis. The chapters devoted to these disorders emphasize MBT skills acquisition and techniques for introducing mentalizing into psychotherapy. Mentalizing plays an important role in understanding how teams, systems, and services interact to facilitate or undermine interventions and service delivery. Chapters on mentalizing in teams and wider systems are included to help clinicians reduce negative impacts on clinical care and support reliable and responsive pathways to treatment. In an effort to encourage clinicians to integrate mentalizing into their clinical practice, empirical research on the developmental origins of mentalizing and how a focus on mentalizing can improve outcomes for patients is incorporated throughout the volume. Improved mentalizing increases resilience to adversity, perhaps protecting individuals from relapse, and improves therapeutic outcomes. The relevant research, as well as proven techniques for promoting resilience and trust, are discussed at length in the book. Finally, as an established component of the literature on neurobiology and higher-order cognition, mentalizing benefits from a number of different strands of research, ranging from neurobiology through child development to adult psychopathology. The book fully explores these relationships and their ramifications. Authoritative, comprehensive, and cutting-edge, the Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice is the single most important resource for clinicians and trainees learning about -- and incorporating -- MBT into their therapeutic repertoire.
Categories: Medical

Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice Second Edition

Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice  Second Edition

The Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice, Second Edition, is an indispensable guide to the current state of clinical work and research on mentalization-based approaches in mental health practice.

Author: Anthony W. Bateman, M.A., FRCPsych

Publisher: American Psychiatric Pub

ISBN: 9781615371402

Category: Medical

Page: 470

View: 356

This new edition of Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice reflects a vibrant field undergoing development along a number of dimensions important for mental health. As evidenced by the number of experts contributing chapters that focus on specialized approaches to mentalization-based treatment (MBT), the range of mental disorders for which this therapy has proved helpful has substantially increased, and now includes psychosis. Second, the range of contexts within which the approach has been shown to be of value has grown. MBT has been found to be useful in outpatient and community settings, and, more broadly, with children, adolescents, couples, and families, and the social contexts where they are found, such as in schools and even prisons. Finally, the framework has been shown to be generalizable to an understanding of the social context of mental health. The model advanced in this book goes beyond an understanding of the development of mentalizing and aims to provide an understanding of its role in a range of social processes.Key concepts, themes, and approaches clearly articulated throughout the book include the following: * Mentalizing is a transdiagnostic concept applicable to a range of mental health conditions, including trauma, personality disorders, eating disorders, depression, substance use disorder, and psychosis. The chapters devoted to these disorders emphasize MBT skills acquisition and techniques for introducing mentalizing into psychotherapy. * Mentalizing plays an important role in understanding how teams, systems, and services interact to facilitate or undermine interventions and service delivery. Chapters on mentalizing in teams and wider systems are included to help clinicians reduce negative impacts on clinical care and support reliable and responsive pathways to treatment.* In an effort to encourage clinicians to integrate mentalizing into their clinical practice, empirical research on the developmental origins of mentalizing and how a focus on mentalizing can improve outcomes for patients is incorporated throughout the volume.* Improved mentalizing increases resilience to adversity, perhaps protecting individuals from relapse, and improves therapeutic outcomes. The relevant research, as well as proven techniques for promoting resilience and trust, are discussed at length in the book.* Finally, as an established component of the literature on neurobiology and higher-order cognition, mentalizing benefits from a number of different strands of research, ranging from neurobiology through child development to adult psychopathology. The book fully explores these relationships and their ramifications. Authoritative, comprehensive, and cutting-edge, the Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice is the single most important resource for clinicians and trainees learning about -- and incorporating -- MBT into their therapeutic repertoire.
Categories: Medical

Trusting in Psychotherapy

Trusting in Psychotherapy

Moreover, in the context of developing the theory and clinical applications of mentalizing, Fonagy and colleagues (2019a) have homed in on epistemic trust, which also bears on the process and effectiveness of psychotherapy.

Author: Jon G. Allen, Ph.D.

Publisher: American Psychiatric Pub

ISBN: 9781615373918

Category: Medical

Page: 250

View: 598

"Cultivating trusting psychotherapy bonds is complex, challenging, and a critically important topic. In Trusting in Psychotherapy, the author posits that trusting cannot be understood apart from trustworthiness and that therapists should give equal attention to the task of becoming trustworthy to their patients. Blending developmental science and ethical thought, the author elucidates such topics as what it means to trust in the practice of psychotherapy; the many facets of trusting and trustworthiness; attachment relationships; the central role of hope in trust; and the ethical-moral basis of trusting and trustworthiness"--
Categories: Medical

Mentalizing in Psychotherapy

Mentalizing in Psychotherapy

The role of mentalizing and epistemic trust in the therapeutic relationship. Psychotherapy, 51(3), 372–380. Fonagy, P., Gergely, G., Jurist, E. L., & Target, M. (2002). Affect regulation, mentalization, and the development of self.

Author: Carla Sharp

Publisher: Guilford Publications

ISBN: 9781462549962

Category: Medical

Page: 210

View: 897

How can therapists help clients reflect more deeply on their own--and other people's--thoughts and emotions? How can the therapeutic relationship be leveraged effectively to create change? This concise book guides therapists of any orientation to incorporate innovative mentalization-based strategies into assessment and intervention. Complex ideas are clearly explained and illustrated with extensive session transcripts and vignettes. Ways to help clients struggling with dysregulated emotions and behavior are highlighted. Compelling topics include the role of mentalization difficulties in personality disorders, special concerns in working with adolescents, and how clinicians can improve their own mentalizing capacities.
Categories: Medical