Memory and Utopian Agency in Utopian Dystopian Literature

Memory and Utopian Agency in Utopian Dystopian Literature

Memory and Utopian Agency in Utopian/Dystopian Literature: Memory of the Future examines modern and contemporary utopian/dystopian literature’s preoccupation with memory, asserting that from the nineteenth century onward, memory and ...

Author: Carter F. Hanson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000165951

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 549

For a genre that imagines possible futures as a means of critiquing the present, utopian/dystopian fiction has been surprisingly obsessed with how the past is remembered. Memory and Utopian Agency in Utopian/Dystopian Literature: Memory of the Future examines modern and contemporary utopian/dystopian literature’s preoccupation with memory, asserting that from the nineteenth century onward, memory and forgetting feature as key problematics in the genre as well as sources of the utopian impulse. Through a series of close readings of utopian/dystopian novels informed by theory and dialectics, Hanson provides a case study history of how and why memory emerged as a problem for utopia, and how recent dystopian texts situate memory as a crucial mode of utopian agency. Hanson demonstrates that many modern and contemporary writers of the genre consider the presence of certain forms of memory as necessary to the project of imagining better societies or to avoiding possible dystopian outcomes.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Dark Horizons

Dark Horizons

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: Tom Moylan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317793557

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 504

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Fiction

Gender and Memory in the Globital Age

Gender and Memory in the Globital Age

Chapter 4, 'Globital Utopias: Literary Imaginaries of Gender, Memory and Technologies', draws on the practice suggested ... practices are imagined in utopian and dystopian fiction at pertinent points in human technological developments, ...

Author: Anna Reading

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137352637

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 692

This book asks how 21st century technologies such as the Internet, mobile phones and social media are transforming human memory and its relationship to gender. Each epoch brings with it new media technologies that have transformed human memory. Anna Reading examines the ways in which globalised digital cultures are changing the gender of memory and memories of gender through a lively set of original case studies in the ‘globital age’. The study analyses imaginaries of gender, memory and technology in utopian literature; it provides an examination of how foetal scanning alters the gendered memories of the human being. Reading draws on original research on women’s use of mobile phones to capture and share personal and family memories as well as analysing changes to journalism and gendered memories, focusing on the mobile witnessing of terrorism and state terror. The book concludes with a critical reflection on Anna Reading’s work as a playwright mobilising feminist memories as part of a digital theatre project 'Phenomenal Women with Fuel Theatre' which created live and digital memories of inspirational women. The book explains in depth Reading’s original concept of digitised and globalised memory - ‘globital memory’ - and suggests how the scholar may use mobile methodologies to understand how memories travel and change in the globital age.
Categories: History

Utopian dystopian Literature

Utopian dystopian Literature

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Author: Paul G. Haschak

Publisher: Metuchen, N.J. : Scarecrow Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105009561346

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 370

View: 560

To find more information about Rowman & Littlefield titles please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Canadian Science Fiction Fantasy and Horror

Canadian Science Fiction  Fantasy  and Horror

It is a bridge between one's resignation in the face of dystopia and one's daydream about utopia. The very power dynamics of The Maerlande Chronicles challenge our notion of utopian fiction and “[emphasize] the quest for truth and ...

Author: Amy J. Ransom

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030156855

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 380

View: 466

Canadian Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror: Bridging the Solitudes exposes the limitations of the solitudes concept so often applied uncritically to the Canadian experience. This volume examines Canadian and Québécois literature of the fantastic across its genres—such as science fiction, fantasy, horror, indigenous futurism, and others—and considers how its interrogation of colonialism, nationalism, race, and gender works to bridge multiple solitudes. Utilizing a transnational lens, this volume reveals how the fantastic is ready-made for exploring, in non-literal terms, the complex and problematic nature of intercultural engagement.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Agency in the Dune Universe

Women s Agency in the Dune Universe

A Literature of Their Own. Princeton University Press, 1977. ... Spence, Jonathan D. The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci. ... Women's Utopian and Dystopian Fiction, edited by Sharon R. Wilson, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, pp.

Author: Kara Kennedy

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030892050

Category: America--Literatures

Page: 225

View: 673

This book undertakes the first large-scale analysis of women's agency in Frank Herbert's six-book science fiction Dune series. Kara Kennedy explores how female characters in the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood--from Jessica to Darwi Odrade--secure control and influence through five avenues of embodied agency: mind-body synergy, reproduction and motherhood, voices, education and memory, and sexuality. She also discusses constraints on their agency, tensions between individual and collective action, and comparisons with other characters including the Mentats, Bene Tleilaxu, and Honored Matres. The book engages with second-wave feminist theories and historical issues to highlight how the series anticipated and paralleled developments in the women's liberation movement. In this context, it addresses issues regarding sexual difference and solidarity, as well as women's demand to have control over their bodies. Kennedy concludes that the series should be acknowledged as a significant contribution to the genre as part of both New Wave and feminist science fiction. Kara Kennedy is a researcher, writer, and educator in the areas of science fiction, digital literacy, and writing. She is an avid scholar of Dune who has lectured and published on various topics including world-building. She posts literary analyses of Dune for a mainstream audience on her blog DuneScholar.com.
Categories: America--Literatures

Utopian and Science Fiction by Women

Utopian and Science Fiction by Women

Butler instead acknowledges all that has been and remains unbearable in human society , but insists that human agency can change even the most dystopian world over time . It demands patience ; Dana must be willing to work , but she must ...

Author: ne L. Donawerth

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815626193

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 196

"This collection speaks to common themes and strategies in women's writing about their different worlds, from Margaret Cavendish's seventeenth-century Blazing World of the North Pole to the "men-less" islands of the French writer Scudery to the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century utopias of Shelley and Gaskell, and science fiction pulps, finishing with the more contemporary feminist fictions of Le Guin, Wittig, Piercy, and Mitchison. It shows that these fictions historically speak to each other and together amount to a literary tradition of women's writing about a better place."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Categories: Literary Criticism

Utopia and Reality

Utopia and Reality

Because of this diverse clientele, many of whom were motivated by competing utopian visions, ... of utopian thinking therefore began as a deconstruction of the binary of utopia and dystopia through this science fiction lens.

Author: Simon Spiegel

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 9781786835253

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 192

Since publication of Thomas More‘s Utopia more than five hundred years ago, there has been a steady stream of literary works that depict a better world; positive utopias in film, however, have been scarce. There is a consensus that utopias in the Morean tradition are not suited to fiction film, and research has accordingly focused on dystopias. Starting from the insight that utopias are always a critical reaction to the deficits of the present, Utopia and Reality takes a different approach by looking into the under-researched area of propaganda and documentary films for depictions of better worlds. This volume brings together researchers from two fields that have so far seen little exchange – documentary studies and utopian scholarship – and covers a wide range of films from Soviet avant-garde to propaganda videos for the terror organisation ISIS, from political-activist to ecofeminist and interactive documentaries.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults

Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults

Mary J. Couzelis DOI: 10.4324/9780203084939-8 As Jack Zipes mentions in the foreword to Utopian and Dystopian Writing for ... emotions, and memory, and the novel examines communal control, individual choice, and the power of memories.

Author: Balaka Basu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136194757

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 226

View: 179

Winner of the Children’s Literature Association Edited Book Award From the jaded, wired teenagers of M.T. Anderson's Feed to the spirited young rebels of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games trilogy, the protagonists of Young Adult dystopias are introducing a new generation of readers to the pleasures and challenges of dystopian imaginings. As the dark universes of YA dystopias continue to flood the market,Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults: Brave New Teenagers offers a critical evaluation of the literary and political potentials of this widespread publishing phenomenon. With its capacity to frighten and warn, dystopian writing powerfully engages with our pressing global concerns: liberty and self-determination, environmental destruction and looming catastrophe, questions of identity and justice, and the increasingly fragile boundaries between technology and the self. When directed at young readers, these dystopian warnings are distilled into exciting adventures with gripping plots and accessible messages that may have the potential to motivate a generation on the cusp of adulthood. This collection enacts a lively debate about the goals and efficacy of YA dystopias, with three major areas of contention: do these texts reinscribe an old didacticism or offer an exciting new frontier in children's literature? Do their political critiques represent conservative or radical ideologies? And finally, are these novels high-minded attempts to educate the young or simply bids to cash in on a formula for commercial success? This collection represents a prismatic and evolving understanding of the genre, illuminating its relevance to children's literature and our wider culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Voices and Genealogies in Literary Studies in English

Women   s Voices and Genealogies in Literary Studies in English

Her main research areas are modernism, utopian literature, womenГs writing, cultural memory, nostalgia, the representation of female body, aging between culture and medicine. Her most recent publications are: Imirror Shards: Conflicting ...

Author: Lilla Maria Crisafulli

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527534841

Category: Social Science

Page: 221

View: 272

The volume investigates the ‘voice’ of women writers in the development of literary studies, and interrogates how scholars read and teach women’s literary texts. These issues are still crucial for women’s and gender studies today and deserve to be properly investigated and constantly updated. The various essays collected here examine how, and to what extent, ‘women’, across time and space, experimented with new genres or forms of expression in order to transform, question, resist or paradoxically consolidate gender discriminations and dominant ideologies: patriarchy, colonialism, slavery and racism, imperialism, religion, and (hetero)sexuality. Women’s Voices and Genealogies in Literary Studies in English is addressed to MA and PhD students in women’s and gender studies, and to all those students or young scholars who are interested in gender methodologies as a mode of practice in literary criticism and analysis. The authors of the volume share a long-standing experience in women’s and gender studies and in teaching English women’s literature, literary criticism and feminist methodologies and theories to students from different national origins.
Categories: Social Science