Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine

Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine

of medieval and Renaissance medical practice based on local archives are still few and scattered; ... The expression "medieval and early Renaissance" is used here merely as a convenient way of delineating the entire span of time covered ...

Author: Nancy G. Siraisi

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226761312

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 461

Western Europe supported a highly developed and diverse medical community in the late medieval and early Renaissance periods. In her absorbing history of this complex era in medicine, Siraisi explores the inner workings of the medical community and illustrates the connections of medicine to both natural philosophy and technical skills.
Categories: History

History Medicine and the Traditions of Renaissance Learning

History  Medicine  and the Traditions of Renaissance Learning

The choice of examples is fascinating, and it puts Renaissance documents into a new context. This is a major book, well written, richly learned and with further implications for more than students of medical history.

Author: Nancy G. Siraisi

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472116029

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 625

A major, path-breaking work, History, Medicine, and the Traditions of Renaissance Learning is Nancy G. Siraisi's examination into the intersections of medically trained authors and history in the period 1450 to 1650. Rather than studying medicine and history as separate disciplinary traditions, Siraisi calls attention to their mutual interaction in the rapidly changing world of Renaissance erudition. Far from their contributions being a mere footnote in the historical record, medical writers had extensive involvement in the reading, production, and shaping of historical knowledge during this important period. With remarkably detailed scholarship, Siraisi investigates doctors' efforts to explore the legacies handed down to them from ancient medical and anatomical writings and the difficult reconciliations this required between the authority of the ancient world and the discoveries of the modern. She also studies the ways in which sixteenth-century medical authors wrote history, both in their own medical texts and in more general historical works. In the course of her study, Siraisi finds that what allowed medical writers to become so fully engaged in the writing of history was their general humanistic background, their experience of history through the field of medicine's past, and the tools that the writing of history offered to the development of a rapidly evolving profession. Nancy G. Siraisi is one of the preeminent scholars of medieval and Renaissance intellectual history, specializing in medicine and science. Now Distinguished Professor Emerita of History at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and a 2008 winner of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she has written numerous books, including Taddeo Alderotti and His Pupils (Princeton, 1981), which won the American Association for the History of Medicine William H. Welch Medal; Avicenna in Renaissance Italy (Princeton, 1987); The Clock and the Mirror (Princeton, 1997); and the widely used textbook Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine (Chicago, 1990), which won the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize from the History of Science Society. In 2003 Siraisi received the History of Science Society's George Sarton Medal, in 2004 she received the Paul Oskar Kristellar Award for Lifetime Achievement of the Renaissance Society of America, and in 2005 she was awarded the American Historical Association Award for Scholarly Distinction. "A fascinating study of Renaissance physicians as avid readers and enthusiastic writers of all kinds of history: from case narratives and medical biographies to archaeological and environmental histories. In this wide-ranging book, Nancy Siraisi demonstrates the deep links between the medical and the humanistic disciplines in early modern Europe." ---Katharine Park, Zemurray Stone Radcliffe Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University "This is a salient but little explored aspect of Renaissance humanism, and there is no doubt that Siraisi has succeeded in throwing light onto a vast subject. The scholarship is wide-ranging and profound, and breaks new ground. The choice of examples is fascinating, and it puts Renaissance documents into a new context. This is a major book, well written, richly learned and with further implications for more than students of medical history." ---Vivian Nutton, Professor, The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, University College London, and author of From Democedes to Harvey: Studies in the History of Medicine "Siraisi shows the many-dimensioned overlaps and interactions between medicine and 'history' in the early modern period, marking a pioneering effort to survey a neglected discipline. Her book follows the changing usage of the classical term 'history' both as empiricism and as a kind of scholarship in the Renaissance before its more modern analytical and critical applications. It is a marvel of erudition in an area insufficiently studied." ---Donald R. Kelley, Emeritus James Westfall Thompson Professor of History, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, and Executive Editor of Journal of the History of Ideas
Categories: History

The Renaissance Hospital

The Renaissance Hospital

For a useful general guide to these theories see N.G. Siraisi , Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine . An Introduction to Knowledge and Practice ( Chicago and London , 1990 ) , pp . 100–6 . 91. N.G. Siraisi , Taddeo Alderotti and his ...

Author: Fellow at King's College Cambridge and Teaches Classics John Henderson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300109954

Category: Medical

Page: 502

View: 548

John Henderson takes us into the Renaissance hospitals of Florence, recreating the enormous barn-like wards and exploring the lives of those who received and those who administered treatment there.
Categories: Medical

Pestilence in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature

Pestilence in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature

More recently, historians such as M. L. Cameron (Anglo-Saxon Medicine J1993]) and John Riddle (Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance [ 1992]) have attempted to validate medieval medicine in light of modern ...

Author: Byron Lee Grigsby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135883836

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 146

Pestilence in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature examines three diseases--leprosy, bubonic plague, and syphilis--to show how doctors, priests, and literary authors from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance interpreted certain illnesses through a moral filter. Lacking knowledge about the transmission of contagious diseases, doctors and priests saw epidemic diseases as a punishment sent by God for human transgression. Accordingly, their job was to properly read sickness in relation to the sin. By examining different readings of specific illnesses, this book shows how the social construction of epidemic diseases formed a kind of narrative wherein man attempts to take the control of the disease out of God's hands by connecting epidemic diseases to the sins of carnality.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Pestilence in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature

Pestilence in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature

More recently , historians such as M. L. Cameron ( Anglo - Saxon Medicine [ 1993 ] ) and John Riddle ( Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance [ 1992 ] ) have attempted to validate medieval medicine in light ...

Author: Bryon Lee Grigsby

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415968224

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 669

First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Beginnings of Western Science

The Beginnings of Western Science

On early medieval medicine, see especially Vivian Nutton, “Early Medieval Medicine and Natural Science”; John M. Riddle ... “The Sources of Medical Knowledge in Anglo-Saxon England”; Siraisi, Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine, pp.

Author: David C. Lindberg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226482040

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 120

When it was first published in 1992, The Beginnings of Western Science was lauded as the first successful attempt ever to present a unified account of both ancient and medieval science in a single volume. Chronicling the development of scientific ideas, practices, and institutions from pre-Socratic Greek philosophy to late-Medieval scholasticism, David C. Lindberg surveyed all the most important themes in the history of science, including developments in cosmology, astronomy, mechanics, optics, alchemy, natural history, and medicine. In addition, he offered an illuminating account of the transmission of Greek science to medieval Islam and subsequently to medieval Europe. The Beginnings of Western Science was, and remains, a landmark in the history of science, shaping the way students and scholars understand these critically formative periods of scientific development. It reemerges here in a second edition that includes revisions on nearly every page, as well as several sections that have been completely rewritten. For example, the section on Islamic science has been thoroughly retooled to reveal the magnitude and sophistication of medieval Muslim scientific achievement. And the book now reflects a sharper awareness of the importance of Mesopotamian science for the development of Greek astronomy. In all, the second edition of The Beginnings of Western Science captures the current state of our understanding of more than two millennia of science and promises to continue to inspire both students and general readers.
Categories: Science

Bodily and Spiritual Hygiene in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

Bodily and Spiritual Hygiene in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

And, as the sociologist George Vigarello stresses, the Middle Ages had inherited and maintained common hygiene practices ... 39 For the humoral theory, see Nancy G. Siraisi, Medieval & Early Renaissance Medicine (see note 4), 104‒106.

Author: Albrecht Classen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110523799

Category: History

Page: 622

View: 470

While most people today take hygiene and medicine for granted, they both have had their own history. We can gain deep insights into the pre-modern world by studying its health-care system, its approaches to medicine, and concept of hygiene. Already the early Middle Ages witnessed great interest in bathing (hot and cold), swimming, and good personal hygiene. Medical activities grew over time, but even early medieval monks were already great experts in treating the sick. The contributions examine literary, medical, historical texts and images and probe the information we can glean from them. The interdisciplinary approach of this volume makes it possible to view this large field in a complex and diversified manner, taking into account both early medieval and early modern treatises on medicine, water, bathing, and health. Such a cultural-historical perspective creates a most valuable bridge connecting literary and scientific documents under the umbrella of the history of mentality and history of everyday life. The volume does not aim at idealizing the past, but it definitely intends to deconstruct modern myths about the 'dirty' and 'unhealthy' Middle Ages and early modern age.
Categories: History

Mental Dis Order in Later Medieval Europe

Mental  Dis Order in Later Medieval Europe

14 Nancy G. Siraisi, Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine:An Introduction to Knowledge and Practice (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990), 13–14, 57–58. 15 Pantegni was based on al-Kitab al-Malaki, the famous book of a Persian ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004269743

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 561

Mental (Dis)order in the Late Middle Ages sketches the boundaries between mental, social and physical order and various states of disorder – unexpected mood swings, fury, melancholy, stress, insomnia, and demonic influence – and focuses on the interaction between lay and elite cultures.
Categories: History

Mental Health Spirituality and Religion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

Mental Health  Spirituality  and Religion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

firmly articulated against the Renaissance's Neoplatonic vision of the figure of the physician as a magus, ... See also Nancy G. Siraisi, Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine: An Introduction to Knowledge and Practice (Chicago and ...

Author: Albrecht Classen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110361643

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 744

View: 741

This volume continues the critical exploration of fundamental issues in the medieval and early modern world, here concerning mental health, spirituality, melancholy, mystical visions, medicine, and well-being. The contributors, who originally had presented their research at a symposium at The University of Arizona in May 2013, explore a wide range of approaches and materials pertinent to these issues, taking us from the early Middle Ages to the eighteenth century, capping the volume with some reflections on the relevance of religion today. Lapidary sciences matter here as much as medical-psychological research, combined with literary and art-historical approaches. The premodern understanding of mental health is not taken as a miraculous panacea for modern problems, but the contributors suggest that medieval and early modern writers, scientists, and artists commanded a considerable amount of arcane, sometimes curious and speculative, knowledge that promises to be of value and relevance even for us today, once again. Modern palliative medicine finds, for instance, intriguing parallels in medieval word magic, and the mystical perspectives encapsulated highly productive alternative perceptions of the macrocosm and microcosm that promise to be insightful and important also for the post-modern world.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Medieval Military Medicine

Medieval Military Medicine

See also, Siraisi, Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine, p. 35. 28. Nicaise, La grande chirurgie de Guy de Chauliac, p. 16. See Siraisi, Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine for more on Guy de Chauliac's sects. 29. Weston (trans.) ...

Author: Brian Burfield

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526754776

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 982

Soldiers of the Middle Ages faced razor-sharp swords and axes that could slice through flesh with gruesome ease, while spears and arrows were made to puncture both armor and the wearer, and even more sinister means of causing harm produced burns and crush injuries. These casualties of war during the 500-year period between the ninth and thirteenth centuries in Northern and Western Europe are the focus of Brian Burfield’s study, but they represent just a portion of the story – disease, disability, disfigurement, damaged minds all played their roles in this awful reality. Surgical methods are described in the book, as are the fixes for fractured skulls, broken bones and damaged teeth. Disfiguring scars and disabling injuries are examined alongside the contemporary attitudes towards them. Also investigated are illnesses like dysentery and St Anthony’s Fire, plus infected wounds which were often more deadly than the weapons of the age. A final chapter on the psychological trauma caused by war is included and contains a significant focus on the world of the Vikings. Brian Burfield’s account features many individual cases, extracting their stories of wounds, sickness and death from chronicles, miracle collections, surgeries, government records and other documents. The prose, poetry and literature of the period are also of great value in bringing these cases to life, as is the evidence provided by modern archaeological and historical scholarship.
Categories: History