Measurement and Meaning in Economics

Measurement and Meaning in Economics

McCloskey (human sciences, U. of Illinois, Chicago) argues that economics has become ahistorical and narrowly scientific--a harmful development for a moral science; she has declared that economics would improve if economists would read more ...

Author: Deirdre N. McCloskey

Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub

ISBN: 1843761742

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 371

View: 653

This essential book collects together, for the first time, the writings of Deirdre McCloskey on economic history and the rhetoric of economics. The essays have been presented to show McCloskey's evolution over time: from economist to critic, positivist to postmodernist, conventional economist to feminist economist, man to woman. Measurement and Meaning in Economics allows the reader to experience an astonishing personal and intellectual journey with one of today's most fascinating economists.McCloskey argues that economics has become ahistorical and narrowly scientific, which is a harmful development for a moral science. In all of the papers presented in this volume she writes with historical consciousness and critical understanding, in an attempt to repair the dysfunctional relationship between economics and the humanities.This book should be read not only by students and scholars of economic history and philosophy, but by all those concerned with the state of economics and its place in the social sciences.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Wellbeing of Nations

The Wellbeing of Nations

This book explains the international collaboration behind this new learning and moves it far forward.’ —Daniel Dorling, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford How and why to use new measures of national wellbeing ...

Author: Paul Allin

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118916209

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 119

What is national wellbeing and what is progress? Why measure these definitions? Why are measures beyond economic performance needed and how will they be used? How do we measure national wellbeing & turn the definitions into observable quantities? Where are we now and where to next? These questions are asked and answered in this much needed, timely book. The Wellbeing of Nations provides an accessible and comprehensive overview of the measurement of national well-being, examining whether national wellbeing is more than the sum of the wellbeing of everyone in the country, and identifying and reviewing requirements for new measures. It begins with definitions, describes how to operationalize those definitions, and takes a critical look at the uses to which such measures are to be put. The authors examine initiatives from around the world, using the UK ‘measuring national wellbeing programme’ as a case study throughout the book, along with case studies drawn from other countries, as well as discussion of the position in some countries not yet drawn into the national wellbeing scene.
Categories: Business & Economics

Quality Measurement in Economics

Quality Measurement in Economics

The concept of quality measurement is revived in this text. Stephen Payson argues that quality measurement is an important issue in the study of price indices and in the additional areas of product innovation and evolutionary change.

Author: Steven Payson

Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub

ISBN: UCSC:32106011803696

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 242

View: 616

The concept of quality measurement is revived and given new meaning in this innovative new book. Steven Payson argues that quality measurement is an important issue in the study of price indices and in the additional areas of product innovation and evolutionary change. The user-value definition of quality is forcefully defended against the producer-cost definition, and a new method of measurement is introduced - the representative good approach (RGA). The RGA provides a new means for measuring quality over long periods of time by examining historical documents. A discussion of evolutionary change lays the groundwork for the identification of two processes: quality improvement and cost reduction. Using data from the Sears Catalog, quality improvement and cost reduction rates are estimated for five goods between 1928 and 1993: shoes, sofas, gas ranges, window fans and air conditioners, and cameras. The results are dramatic, supporting ground-breaking hypotheses on the determinants of quality improvement and cost reduction.
Categories: Business & Economics

Measurement in Economics

Measurement in Economics

First discussions on several topics of this book took place at a symposium held at the University of Karlsruhe (July 14 - 21, 1985).

Author: Wolfgang Eichhorn

Publisher: Physica

ISBN: 3642524834

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 830

View: 323

First discussions on several topics of this book took place at a symposium held at the University of Karlsruhe (July 14 - 21, 1985). The book is divided into nine parts with the headings "Methodology and Methods" (4 papers), "Prices" (9), "Efficiency" (5), "Preferences" (7), "Quality" (2), "Inequality" (6), "Taxation" (6), "Aggregation" (6), and "Econometrics" (6). The topics range from the "equation of measurement", a functional equation which plays an important role in the subject, through various approaches to price, efficiency, inequality and tax progression measurement to results on consistency, efficiency and separability in aggregation, productivity measurement, cost functions, allocation inefficiencies, key sector indices, and testing of integrability conditions in econometrics. There are applications to the economies of the U.S.A., Japan and Germany. It contains also papers which deal with preferences, environmental quality and with noxiousness of substances.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Measurement of Economic Relationships

The Measurement of Economic Relationships

Astranger in academia cannot but be impressed by the apparent uniformity and precision of the methodology currently applied to the measurement of economic relationships.

Author: Peter Tryfos

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402028397

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 148

View: 410

Astranger in academia cannot but be impressed by the apparent uniformity and precision of the methodology currently applied to the measurement of economic relationships. In scores of journal articles and other studies, a theoretical argument is typically presented to justify the position that a certain variable is related to certain other, possibly causal, variables. Regression or a related method is applied to a set of observations on these variables, and the conclusion often emerges that the causa,l variables are indeed "significant" at a certain "level," thereby lending support to the theoretical argument-an argument presumably formulated independently of the observations. A variable may be declared significant (and few doubt that this does not mean important) at, say, the 0. 05 level, but not the 0. 01. The effects of the variables are calculated to many significant digits, and are often accompanied by intervals and forecasts of not quite obvious meaning but certainly of reassuring "confidence. " The uniformity is also evident in the many mathematically advanced text books of statistics and econometrics, and in their less rigorous introductory versions for students in economics or business. It is reflected in the tools of the profession: computer programs, from the generaiones addressed to the incidental researcher to the dedicated and sophisticated programs used by the experts, display the same terms and implement the same methodology. In short, there appears no visible alternative to the established methodol ogy and no sign of reservat ions concerning its validity.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Economics and Science of Measurement

The Economics and Science of Measurement

Measurement in 6000 BC relied totally on counting: 1, 2, 3, and so forth. ... However, the measurement of economic variables is not the same as the economics of measurement, meaning the economic implications of being able to measure ...

Author: Albert N. Link

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000442236

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 92

View: 692

Metrology is the study of measurement science. Although classical economists have emphasized the importance of measurement per se, the majority of economics-based writings on the topic have taken the form of government reports related to the activities of specific national metrology laboratories. This book is the first systematic study of measurement activity at a national metrology laboratory, and the laboratory studied is the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) within the U.S. Department of Commerce. The primary objective of the book is to emphasize for academic and policy audiences the economic importance of measurement not only as an area of study but also as a tool for sustaining technological advancement as an element of economic growth. Toward this goal, the book offers an overview of the economic benefits and consequences of measurement standards; an argument for public sector support of measurement standards; a historical perspective of the measurement activities at NIST; an empirical analysis of one particular measurement activity at NIST, namely calibration testing; and a roadmap for future research on the economics of metrology.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Measurement of Capital

The Measurement of Capital

These questions represent the common themes of this collection of papers, originally presented at a 1976 meeting of the Conference on Income and Wealth.

Author: Dan Usher

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226843025

Category: Study Aids

Page: 568

View: 627

How is real capital measured by government statistical agencies? How could this measure be improved to correspond more closely to an economist's ideal measure of capital in economic analysis and prediction? It is possible to construct a single, reliable time series for all capital goods, regardless of differences in vintage, technological complexity, and rates of depreciation? These questions represent the common themes of this collection of papers, originally presented at a 1976 meeting of the Conference on Income and Wealth.
Categories: Study Aids