Making News at The New York Times

Author: Nikki Usher

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472035967

Category: Social Science

Page: 283

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An ethnographic study of The New York Times' business desk provides a unique vantage point to see the future for news in the digital age.
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Mediated Communication

Author: Philip M. Napoli

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 311048112X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 694

View: 1627

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Media scholarship has responded to a rapidly evolving media environment that has challenged existing theories and methods while also giving rise to new theoretical and methodological approaches. This volume explores the state of contemporary media research. Focusing on Intellectual Foundations, Theoretical Perspectives, Methodological Approaches, Context, and Contemporary Issues, this volume is a valuable resource for media scholars and students.
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Media Today

Mass Communication in a Converging World

Author: Joseph Turow

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317401034

Category: Social Science

Page: 446

View: 4735

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Media Today uses convergence as a lens that puts students at the center of the profound changes in the 21st century media world. Through the convergence lens they learn to think critically about the role of media today and what these changes mean for their lives presently and in the future. The book’s media systems approach helps students to look carefully at how media content is created, distributed, and exhibited in the new world that the digital revolution has created. From newspapers to video games and social networking to mobile platforms, Media Today prepares students to live in the digital world of media.
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Becoming the News

How Ordinary People Respond to the Media Spotlight

Author: Ruth Palmer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231544766

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 261

View: 5847

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What does it feel like to be featured, quoted, or just named in a news story? A refugee family, the survivor of a shooting, a primary voter in Iowa—the views and experiences of ordinary people are an important component of journalism. While much has been written about how journalists work and gather stories, what do we discover about the practice of journalism and attitudes about the media by focusing on the experiences of the subjects themselves? In Becoming the News, Ruth Palmer argues that understanding the motivations and experiences of those who have been featured in news stories—voluntarily or not—sheds new light on the practice of journalism and the importance many continue to place on the role of the mainstream media. Based on dozens of interviews with news subjects, Becoming the News studies how ordinary people make sense of their experience as media subjects. Palmer charts the arc of the experience of “making” the news, from the events that brought an ordinary person to journalists’ attention through the decision to cooperate with reporters, interactions with journalists, and reactions to the news coverage and its aftermath. She explores what motivates someone to talk to the press; whether they consider the potential risks; the power dynamics between a journalist and their subject; their expectations about the motivations of journalists; and the influence of social media on their decisions and reception. Pointing to the ways traditional news organizations both continue to hold on to and are losing their authority, Becoming the News has important implications for how we think about the production and consumption of news at a time when Americans distrust the news media more than ever.
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Issues in Media

Selections from CQ Researcher

Author: CQ Researcher,

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483385876

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 328

View: 5933

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What is the future of television? What is the impact of media violence on society? Is news quality better or worse online? Should we regulate internet and social media use, and if so, how? Will traditional print books disappear from the marketplace? These are just a sampling of the important, provocative questions in this new reader, sure to provide a solid foundation to spark lively classroom discussion. For current coverage of controversial and important issues centering on media, look to the balanced reporting, complete overviews and engaging writing that CQ Researcher has consistently provided for more than eighty years. This brief reader allows students to see the links between media, culture, business and politics, and an opportunity to view the issues from all sides while giving them a window into the relationships between media, culture, business, and politics. In addition, useful pedagogical features—pro/con debates, graphs, tables, photos, suggested readings, and bibliographies—advance critical thinking and help in study and review.
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Decade of Nightmares

The End of the Sixties and the Making of Eighties America

Author: Philip Jenkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199884447

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 1288

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Why did the youthful optimism and openness of the sixties give way to Ronald Reagan and the spirit of conservative reaction--a spirit that remains ascendant today? Drawing on a wide array of sources--including tabloid journalism, popular fiction, movies, and television shows--Philip Jenkins argues that a remarkable confluence of panics, scares, and a few genuine threats created a climate of fear that led to the conservative reaction. He identifies 1975 to 1986 as the watershed years. During this time, he says, there was a sharp increase in perceived threats to our security at home and abroad. At home, America seemed to be threatened by monstrous criminals--serial killers, child abusers, Satanic cults, and predatory drug dealers, to name just a few. On the international scene, we were confronted by the Soviet Union and its evil empire, by OPEC with its stranglehold on global oil, by the Ayatollahs who made hostages of our diplomats in Iran. Increasingly, these dangers began to be described in terms of moral evil. Rejecting the radicalism of the '60s, which many saw as the source of the crisis, Americans adopted a more pessimistic interpretation of human behavior, which harked back to much older themes in American culture. This simpler but darker vision ultimately brought us Ronald Reagan and the ascendancy of the political Right, which more than two decades later shows no sign of loosening its grip. Writing in his usual crisp and witty prose, Jenkins offers a truly original and persuasive account of a period that continues to fascinate the American public. It is bound to captivate anyone who lived through this period, as well as all those who want to understand the forces that transformed--and continue to define--the American political landscape.
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Interactive Journalism

Hackers, Data, and Code

Author: Nikki Usher

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780252040511

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 1760

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"Traditional journalism faces the growing reality that the news business model remains an unsolvable problem. Audiences can go anywhere at any time. Technological and computing advances offer opportunities to explore on web and mobile beyond what has ever been possible before, thanks to an explosion in programming knowledge. The infrastructure and experience of information delivery has evolved to seemingly erase time and space boundaries. This larger setting for news, bound up in changes to economics, technology and culture, has created the conditions for a new subspecialty of the journalism profession to emerge: interactive journalism. In Interactive Journalism, Nikki Usher brings together a comprehensive theoretical and empirical portrait of this subspeciality. Beginning with a theoretical overview of professionalism, Usher provides a comprehensive history of fields that come together to define interactive journalism: computer assisted reporting, photojournalism and graphics. She then moves from the people behind interactive journalism to the work that these journalists do to the special abstract knowledge they provide the profession. With vignettes from across the world, she takes us from in-depth look at Al Jazeera English interactive creation to the BBC to the Guardian's data desk to the New York Times. Interactive Journalism illuminates the professions, people, work and knowledge of a subspeciality that has emerged in the age of the rise of digital culture as a possible answer to the decline and fall of traditional journalism"--
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Making Noise, Making News

Suffrage Print Culture and U.S. Modernism

Author: Mary Chapman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199988293

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 9330

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For most people, the US suffrage campaign is encapsulated in images of orators such as the tightly coifed Susan B. Anthony, the wimpled Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and others who hectored for women's rights throughout the nineteenth century. The campaign to secure the vote for US women, however, was also a modern and print-cultural phenomenon, waged with humor, style, and creativity. In this fascinating cultural history, Mary Chapman demonstrates the importance of the aesthetically innovative print culture produced by US suffragists in the two decades leading up to the passage of the 19th Amendment, seven decades after women's rights activists first met at Seneca Falls. A century before the advent of social media", suffragists mobilized the masses [fashioned a "suffragist spring" through creative forms of propaganda including advocacy journals, guest-edited mainstream magazines, banners, voiceless speech placards, publicity stunts, poetry, and fiction. These propaganda forms made the public sphere much more inclusive even as they also perpetuated an image of the suffragist New Woman as native-born, white, and middle-class. Making Noise, Making News also understands modern suffragist print culture as a demonstrable link between the Progressive Era's political campaign for a voice in the public sphere and Modernism's aesthetic efforts to re-imagine literary voice. Chapman charts a relationship between modern suffragist print cultural "noise" and what literary modernists understood by "making it new!", asserting that the experimental tactics of US suffrage print culture contributed to, and even anticipated, the formal innovations of US literary modernism. Drawing on little-known archives and featuring over twenty visually stunning illustrations, Making Noise, Making News provides startling documentation of Marianne Moore's closeted career as a suffrage propagandist, the persuasive effects of Algonquin Table's Alice Duer Miller's popular poetry column,Asian-American author Sui Sin Far's challenge to the racism and classism of modern suffragism, and Gertrude Stein's midcentury recognition of intersections between suffrage discourse and literary modernism."
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