Madame De Treymes And Three Novellas

Madame De Treymes  And Three Novellas

[Madame de Treymes, and others] Madame de Treymes and three novellas/Edith Wharton—1st Scribner pbk. fiction ed. p. cm. Contents: Introduction—The Touchstone (1900)—Sanctuary (1903)—Madame de Treymes (1907)—Bunner sisters (1916). 1.

Author: Wharton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439106006

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 519

In addition to Edith Wharton’s Madame de Treymes, this eBook set includes three novellas: The Touchstone, Sanctuary, and Bunner Sisters—short works that are as rich in social satire as they are cunningly insightful. Madame de Treymes, Edith Wharton's first publication after the highly successful The House of Mirth, is a captivating portrait of turn-of-the-century American and French culture. Inspired by Wharton's own entré into Parisian society in 1906 and reminiscent of the works of Henry James, it tells the story of two young innocents abroad: Fanny Frisbee of New York, unhappily married to the dissolute Marquis de Malrive, and John Durham, her childhood friend who arrives in Paris intent on convincing Fanny to divorce her husband and marry him instead. A subtle investigation of the clash of cultures and the role of women in the social hierarchy, Madame de Treymes confirms Edith Wharton's position, as Edmund Wilson wrote, as "an historian of the American society of her time." This edition of Madame de Treymes also includes three novellas: The Touchstone, Sanctuary, and Bunner Sisters. These short works are rich in the social satire and cunning insight that characterized Wharton's highly acclaimed novels The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth.
Categories: Fiction

Madame de Treymes and Other Stories

Madame de Treymes and Other Stories

Madame de Treymes,” written in 1907, offers a concise perspective on the differences between American and French society from the vantage point of a ... This compilation of Wharton's short fiction features three additional stories.

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Courier Dover Publications

ISBN: 9780486825786

Category: Fiction

Page: 160

View: 250

An American tries to escape her marriage to a French aristocrat in the title story of this collection. Additional tales include "Autres Temps …," "The Long Run," and "The Triumph of Night."
Categories: Fiction

A Cultural History of Marriage in the Age of Empires

A Cultural History of Marriage in the Age of Empires

Watt, Ian (2001), The Rise of the Novel, Berkeley: University of California Press. Weeks, Jeffrey (1981), Sex, Politics and ... Wharton, Edith ([1907] 1996), “Madame de Treymes,” in Three European Novels, 1–52, Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Author: Paul Puschmann

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350179752

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 893

This volume looks at how, during the age of empires (1800–1900), marriage was a key transition in the life course worldwide, a rite of passage everywhere with major cultural significance. While in some ways the institution of marriage became threatened – for instance through rising divorce rates in Western societies – in others it became more anchored than ever before. In Western Europe marriage was increasingly regarded as the only way to reach happiness and self-fulfillment, and romantic partner choice became a new ideal, but material interests remained nevertheless guiding principles in the selection of a partner for life. In the United States former slaves obtained the right to marry and to formalize existing bonds after the Civil War, leading to a convergence in marriage patterns between the black and white population. In Latin America, marriage was and remained less common than in other world regions – due to the prevalence of consensual unions – but marriage rates were nevertheless on the rise. A similar trend was observed in Australia and New Zealand. In African and Asian societies, European colonial powers tried to change the marriage customs of indigenous populations-for instance regarding polygamy and arranged marriages-but sooner or later they had to adapt themselves and their colonial administrations in order to avoid major resistance. In a world of turbulent political and economic change, marriage and the family remained safe havens, the linchpins of society that they had been for centuries. A Cultural History of Marriage in the Age of Empires presents an overview of the period with essays on Courtship and Ritual; Religion, State and Law; Kinship and Social Networks; the Family Economy; Love and Sex; the Breaking of Vows; and Representations of Marriage.
Categories: History

The Novel Art

The Novel Art

Madame de Treymes and Three Novellas [New York: Scribner's, 1995]. 158) 42. That Maggie acts as an “artist” of sorts in the second volume of the novel, and that James therefore is drawing a strong analogy between what she does and what ...

Author: Mark McGurl

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691214832

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 526

Once upon a time there were good American novels and bad ones, but none was thought of as a work of art. The Novel Art tells the story of how, beginning with Henry James, this began to change. Examining the late-nineteenth century movement to elevate the status of the novel, its sources, paradoxes, and reverberations into the twentieth century, Mark McGurl presents a more coherent and wide-ranging account of the development of American modernist fiction than ever before. Moving deftly from James to Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Dashiell Hammett, and Djuna Barnes among others, McGurl argues that what unifies this diverse group of ambitious writers is their agonized relation to a middling genre rarely included in discussions of the fine arts. He concludes that the new product, despite its authors' desire to distinguish it from popular forms, never quite forsook the intimacy the genre had long cultivated with the common reader. Indeed, the ''art novel'' sought status within the mass market, and among its prime strategies was a promotion of the mind as a source of value in an economy increasingly dependent on mental labor. McGurl also shows how modernism's obsessive interest in simple-mindedness revealed a continued concern with the masses even as it attempted to use this simplicity to produce a heightened sophistication of form. Masterfully argued and set in elegant prose, The Novel Art provides a rich new understanding of the fascinating road the American novel has taken from being an artless enterprise to an aesthetic one.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Nabokov s Favorite Word Is Mauve

Nabokov s Favorite Word Is Mauve

... Glimpses of the Moon Twilight Sleep The Mother's Recompense The Children Fast and Loose Madame de Treymes The House of Mirth E. B. White—3 Novels Charlotte's Web Stuart Little The Trumpet of the Swan Tom Wolfe—4 Novels A Man in Full ...

Author: Ben Blatt

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781501105401

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 329

Data meets literature in this “enlightening” (The Wall Street Journal), “brilliant” (The Boston Globe), “Nate Silver-esque” (O, The Oprah Magazine) look at what the numbers have to say about our favorite authors and their masterpieces. There’s a famous piece of writing advice—offered by Ernest Hemingway, Stephen King, and myriad writers in between—not to use -ly adverbs like “quickly” or “angrily.” It sounds like solid advice, but can we actually test it? If we were to count all the -ly adverbs these authors used in their careers, do they follow their own advice? What’s more, do great books in general—the classics and the bestsellers—share this trait? In the age of big data we can answer questions like these in the blink of an eye. In Nabokov’s Favorite Word Is Mauve, a “literary detective story: fast-paced, thought-provoking, and intriguing” (Brian Christian, coauthor of Algorithms to Live By), statistician and journalist Ben Blatt explores the wealth of fun findings that can be discovered by using text and data analysis. He assembles a database of thousands of books and hundreds of millions of words, and then he asks the questions that have intrigued book lovers for generations: What are our favorite authors’ favorite words? Do men and women write differently? Which bestselling writer uses the most clichés? What makes a great opening sentence? And which writerly advice is worth following or ignoring? All of Blatt’s investigations and experiments are original, conducted himself, and no math knowledge is needed to enjoy the book. On every page, there are new and eye-opening findings. By the end, you will have a newfound appreciation of your favorite authors and also come away with a fresh perspective on your own writing. “Blatt’s new book reveals surprising literary secrets” (Entertainment Weekly) and casts an x-ray through literature, allowing us to see both the patterns that hold it together and the brilliant flourishes that allow it to spring to life.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Writing of Fiction

The Writing of Fiction

Other Books by Edith Wharton The Age of Innocence A Backward Glance The Children The Custom of the Country The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton The Glimpses of the Moon The House of Mirth Madame de Treymes and Three Novellas The Mother's ...

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476790565

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 128

View: 550

A rare work of nonfiction from Edith Wharton, The Writing of Fiction contains brilliant advice on writing from the first woman ever to win a Pulitzer Prize -- for her first novel The Age of Innocence. In The Writing of Fiction, Wharton provides general comments on the roots of modern fiction, the various approaches to writing a piece of fiction, and the development of form and style. She also devotes entire chapters to the telling of a short story, the construction of a novel, and the importance of character and situation in the novel. Not only a valuable treatise on the art of writing, The Writing of Fiction also allows readers to experience the inimitable but seldom heard voice of one of America's most important and beloved writers, and includes a final chapter on the pros and cons of Marcel Proust.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

James Fenimore Cooper Sea Tales LOA 54

James Fenimore Cooper  Sea Tales  LOA  54

Edith Wharton NOVELS R.W.B. Lewis , editor The House of Mirth The Reef The Custom of the Country The Age of Innocence 1328 pages ISBN 0-940450-31-3 $ 35.00 NOVELLAS AND OTHER WRITINGS Cynthia Griffin Wolff , editor Madame de Treymes ...

Author: James Fenimore Cooper

Publisher: Library of America

ISBN: 0940450704

Category: Fiction

Page: 902

View: 517

In The Pilot (1824) and The Red Rover (1828), James Fenimore Cooper invented a new literary genre: the sea novel. Collected here in a single Library of America volume, they are among his finest works. Bold, vigorous, original, each is a tale of high adventure that vividly captures the majesty and power of the seafaring life. Cooper drew on his direct knowledge of ships and sailors to present a truer picture of life on the sea than had ever before achieved in literature. As a boy of seventeen he had sailed before the mast on a merchantman bound from New York to London and then to Spain. On board he experienced the life of a common seaman, learned the craft of sailing, encountered terrifying storms, was chased by pirates, and watched the impressment of crew members by a British man-of-war. He later served as an officer in the United States Navy. The Pilot is loosely based upon stories of John Paul Jones’s daring hit-and-run tactics during the Revolutionary War. The shadowy hero, modeled on Jones, leads a squadron of the infant American navy in a series of raids on the English coast, braving fierce storms and the guns of hostile warships, yet never revealing his identity. In this novel Cooper introduced the character of the “old salt,” the seasoned deckhand happy only aboard ship. Long Tom Coffin, with his briny conversation and shrewd nautical advice, is the first of Cooper’s memorable portraits of common seaman. A ghostly ship, an uncanny hero, a heroine kidnapped by pirates, revelations of mistaken identity, and the reunion of long-lost relatives—scenes of romance and adventure fill the pages of The Red Rover, Cooper’s most theatrical novel. Set in the mid-eighteenth century, the tale recounts the exploits of a noble outcast and visionary who foresees America’s destiny as a sovereign nation. Forced into a life of piracy, the Rover conducts his private war of independence in a story that equates the free and daring life with the American dream of self-reliance and liberty from British rule. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
Categories: Fiction

Madame de Treymes and Three Novellas

Madame de Treymes and Three Novellas

This collection contains: "Madame de Treymes" a novella that depicts the sharp contrasts between French and American values; "The Touchstone" a story about greed, betrayal and ultimately, forgiveness; "Sanctuary" Wharton's investigation of ...

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Digireads.Com

ISBN: 1420943286

Category: Fiction

Page: 174

View: 335

Edith Wharton was an American novelist, poet and short story writer whose works display a mastery over the realistic fiction genre. Although she grew up in a world of refined manners and fashionable people, she was also aware of its superficiality, a theme that frequently appeared in her fiction. She began writing short stories and poetry at a young age, impressing such literary figures as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and William Dean Howells. Her stories range widely from powerful social commentary to titillating ghost stories that made Wharton extremely popular beyond her living years. This collection contains: "Madame de Treymes" a novella that depicts the sharp contrasts between French and American values; "The Touchstone" a story about greed, betrayal and ultimately, forgiveness; "Sanctuary" Wharton's investigation of the psychological forces that drive a person, and her critique of nature versus nurture; and "Bunner Sisters" a dark story of two sisters whose lives are corrupted by the dark, impoverished world outside their small, New York shop.
Categories: Fiction

Kate Chopin Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Kate Chopin  Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman

1 Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Studies in Short Fiction — An Introduction The three authors ... of less than a thousand words, and Edith Wharton's novellas, Sanctuary, The Touchstone and Madame de Treymes.

Author: Janet Beer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349260157

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 223

View: 669

A wide range of short fiction by Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman is the focus for this study, examining both genre and theme. Chopin's short stories, Wharton's novellas, Chopin's frankly erotic writing and the homilies in which Gilman warns of the dangers of the sexually transmitted disease are compared. There are also essays on ethnicity in the work of Chopin, Wharton's New England stories, Gilman's innovative use of genre and 'The Yellow Wallpaper' on film. All three writers are still popular in US classrooms in particular. This paperback edition includes a new Preface to the material, providing a useful update on recent scholarship.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Madame de Treymes

Madame de Treymes

" This edition of Madame de Treymes also includes three novellas: The Touchstone, Sanctuary, and Bunner Sisters.

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798510421361

Category:

Page: 78

View: 937

Madame de Treymes, Edith Wharton's first publication after the highly successful The House of Mirth, is a captivating portrait of turn-of-the-century American and French culture. Inspired by Wharton's own entré into Parisian society in 1906 and reminiscent of the works of Henry James, it tells the story of two young innocents abroad: Fanny Frisbee of New York, unhappily married to the dissolute Marquis de Malrive, and John Durham, her childhood friend who arrives in Paris intent on convincing Fanny to divorce her husband and marry him instead. A subtle investigation of the clash of cultures and the role of women in the social hierarchy, Madame de Treymes confirms Edith Wharton's position, as Edmund Wilson wrote, as "an historian of the American society of her time." This edition of Madame de Treymes also includes three novellas: The Touchstone, Sanctuary, and Bunner Sisters. These short works are rich in the social satire and cunning insight that characterized Wharton's highly acclaimed novels The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth.
Categories: