Lucretius on Atomic Motion

Lucretius on Atomic Motion

This is the first commentary on Lucretius' theory of atomic motion, one of the most difficult and technical parts of De Rerum Natura.

Author: Don Fowler

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191819360

Category: Atomic theory

Page: 513

View: 946

This is the first commentary on Lucretius' theory of atomic motion, one of the most difficult and technical parts of De Rerum Natura.
Categories: Atomic theory

A Commentary on Lucretius De Rerum Natura

A Commentary on Lucretius De Rerum Natura

This is the first commentary on Lucretius' theory of atomic motion, one of the most difficult and technical parts of De rerum natura.

Author: Former Felow and Tutor in Classics Don Fowler

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199243581

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 513

View: 366

This is the first commentary on Lucretius' theory of atomic motion, one of the most difficult and technical parts of De rerum natura. The late Don Fowler sets new standards for Lucretian studies in his awesome command both of the ancient literary, philological, and philosophical background to this Latin Epicurean poem, and of the relevant modern scholarship.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Oxford Handbook of Epicurus and Epicureanism

Oxford Handbook of Epicurus and Epicureanism

Lucretius, attempting in 2.216–93 to prove the existence of the swerve, introduces in these lines examples of actions ... where Lucretius notes that the motions of motes in a sunbeam provide not only an example of what atomic motion is ...

Author: Phillip Mitsis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199744213

Category: Philosophy

Page: 848

View: 139

The ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus (341-270 BCE), though often despised for his materialism, hedonism, and denial of the immortality of the soul during many periods of history, has at the same time been a source of inspiration to figures as diverse as Vergil, Hobbes, Thomas Jefferson, and Bentham. This volume offers authoritative discussions of all aspects of Epicurus's philosophy and then traces out some of its most important subsequent influences throughout the Western intellectual tradition. Such a detailed and comprehensive study of Epicureanism is especially timely given the tremendous current revival of interest in Epicurus and his rivals, the Stoics. The thirty-one contributions in this volume offer an unmatched resource for all those wishing to deepen their knowledge of Epicurus' powerful arguments about happiness, death, and the nature of the material world and our place in it. At the same time, his arguments are carefully placed in the context of ancient and subsequent disputes, thus offering readers the opportunity of measuring Epicurean arguments against a wide range of opponents--from Platonists, Aristotelians and Stoics, to Hegel and Nietzsche, and finally on to such important contemporary philosophers as Thomas Nagel and Bernard Williams. The volume offers separate and detailed discussions of two fascinating and ongoing sources of Epicurean arguments, the Herculaneum papyri and the inscription of Diogenes of Oenoanda. Our understanding of Epicureanism is continually being enriched by these new sources of evidence and the contributors to this volume have been able to make use of them in presenting the most current understanding of Epicurus's own views. By the same token, the second half of the volume is devoted to the extraordinary influence of Epicurean doctrines, often either neglected or misunderstood, in literature, political thinking, scientific innovation, personal conceptions of freedom and happiness, and in philosophy generally. Taken together, the contributions in this volume offer the most comprehensive and detailed account of Epicurus and Epicureanism available in English.
Categories: Philosophy

Deleuze Lucretius Encounter

Deleuze Lucretius Encounter

This follows from the separation of atomic movement and void space. If void space or the medium traversed by moving atoms is smooth and continuous, while atomic motion is indivisible, then atoms are always in a movement that is ...

Author: Ryan J. Johnson

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474416542

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 890

More than any other 20th-century philosopher, Deleuze considers himself an apprentice to the history of philosophy. But scholarship has ignored one of the more formative influences on Deleuze: Lucretian atomism. Deleuze's encounter with Lucretius sparked a way of thinking that resonates throughout all his writings: from immanent ontology to affirmative ethics, from dynamic materialism to the generation of thought itself. Filling a significant gap in Deleuze Studies, Ryan J. Johnson tells the story of the Deleuze-Lucretius encounter that begins and ends with a powerful claim: Lucretian atomism produced Deleuzianism.
Categories: Philosophy

Artists and Intellectuals and the Requests of Power

Artists and Intellectuals and the Requests of Power

It is a standard technique used by Lucretius in his didactic poem on Epicureanism, the De rerum natura.21 It has long been recognised that the reflections of C. 3.1 are articulated ... 23 See Don P. Fowler: Lucretius on atomic motion.

Author: Ivo De Gennaro

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004172135

Category: Philosophy

Page: 204

View: 725

A much discussed question in classical studies is the comparison between the situation of poets in Augustan Rome and that of artists and intellectuals in the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century. As instructive as this question proves to be for an understanding of the relation between the freedom of art and thinking on the one hand and power on the other, it also reveals the insufficiency of our present grasp of this crucial articulation of our humanity. This volume offers a multidisciplinary and comparative approach to the problem, complementing the historical perspective with a regard on Eastern traditions. It thus explores tentative paths for future research on an issue of critical importance for the shaping of the global world.
Categories: Philosophy

Epicurus on Freedom

Epicurus on Freedom

Lucretius draws an analogy between the three causes of atomic motion – collisions, weight, and the swerve – and three types of bodily motion – those due to external force, those due to 'internal necessity,' and those due to our voluntas ...

Author: Tim O'Keefe

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139446242

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 160

In this 2005 book, Tim O'Keefe reconstructs the theory of freedom of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus (341–271/0 BCE). Epicurus' theory has attracted much interest, but our attempts to understand it have been hampered by reading it anachronistically as the discovery of the modern problem of free will and determinism. O'Keefe argues that the sort of freedom which Epicurus wanted to preserve is significantly different from the 'free will' which philosophers debate today, and that in its emphasis on rational action it has much closer affinities with Aristotle's thought than with current preoccupations. His original and provocative book will be of interest to a wide range of readers in Hellenistic philosophy.
Categories: Philosophy

Lucretius as Theorist of Political Life

Lucretius as Theorist of Political Life

therefore sets the stage for what is to come—the account of random, meaningless, and violent motion. Lucretius's introduction to the section on atomic motion reveals the extenttowhich Venus has vanished from the account.

Author: J. Colman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137292322

Category: Political Science

Page: 173

View: 946

Lucretius as Theorist of Political Life is an interpretation of Lucretius' poem On the Nature of Things as a defense of philosophy given the irremediable tension between the competing claims of the philosophic and political life. The central issue is the need for, and attempt by, philosophy to justify and defend its way of life to the political community. This work uncovers how Lucretius' conception of the philosophic life, and the reaction to the human, religious, and political implications of the discovery of nature, distinguish his intention from the anti-theological animus that drives the politically and scientifically ambitious project of his modern appropriators.
Categories: Political Science

Ecocriticism Ecology and the Cultures of Antiquity

Ecocriticism  Ecology  and the Cultures of Antiquity

But while the elementa analogy usually makes the letters of words mirror atomic motion, Lucretius does something slightly different with the elementa analogy in the animal contract. Here, the letters of words mirror social motion, ...

Author: Christopher Schliephake

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498532853

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 372

By focusing on ancient culture and its reception, this book fills integrates antiquity into our current ecocritical theory and practice to fill in a gap in our environmental debates. It aims at a re-evaluation of antiquity in the light of present-day environmental concerns and re-frames our contemporary outlook on the more-than-human world in the light of cultures far removed from our own.
Categories: History

The Poetry of Victorian Scientists

The Poetry of Victorian Scientists

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura, Bk 11, 95-8; 105-7, 101. Munro (trans.), 11, 3o. Fowler, Lucretius on Atomic Motion, 181. Thompson, Life of Thomson, 1, 514-15. Maxwell, Letters and Papers, 11, 446. See Plate XIII opposite, a photograph of ...

Author: Daniel Brown

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139619967

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 482

A surprising number of Victorian scientists wrote poetry. Many came to science as children through such games as the spinning-top, soap-bubbles and mathematical puzzles, and this playfulness carried through to both their professional work and writing of lyrical and satirical verse. This is the first study of an oddly neglected body of work that offers a unique record of the nature and cultures of Victorian science. Such figures as the physicist James Clerk Maxwell toy with ideas of nonsense, as through their poetry they strive to delineate the boundaries of the new professional science and discover the nature of scientific creativity. Also considering Edward Lear, Daniel Brown finds the Victorian renaissances in research science and nonsense literature to be curiously interrelated. Whereas science and literature studies have mostly focused upon canonical literary figures, this original and important book conversely explores the uses literature was put to by eminent Victorian scientists.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Autonomous Nature

Autonomous Nature

141; Richard Kautz, Chaos: The Science of Predictable Random Motion (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011). See Lucretius ... see Don Fowler, Lucretius on Atomic Motion: A Commentary on De Rerum Natura, Book Two, lines 1–332 (Oxford, ...

Author: Carolyn Merchant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317395881

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 958

Autonomous Nature investigates the history of nature as an active, often unruly force in tension with nature as a rational, logical order from ancient times to the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century. Along with subsequent advances in mechanics, hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism, nature came to be perceived as an orderly, rational, physical world that could be engineered, controlled, and managed. Autonomous Nature focuses on the history of unpredictability, why it was a problem for the ancient world through the Scientific Revolution, and why it is a problem for today. The work is set in the context of vignettes about unpredictable events such as the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, the Bubonic Plague, the Lisbon Earthquake, and efforts to understand and predict the weather and natural disasters. This book is an ideal text for courses on the environment, environmental history, history of science, or the philosophy of science.
Categories: Social Science

Atomism in the Aeneid

Atomism in the Aeneid

to describe atomic motion.85 One example, mentioned briefly earlier in this chapter, is the dichotomy between turba ... in the natural world.88 Another pervasive set of metaphors found in Lucretius compares atomic motion with warfare.

Author: Matthew M. Gorey

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780197518748

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 256

"This book examines the role of philosophical metaphor and allegory in the Aeneid, focusing on tendentious allusions to Lucretian atomism. It argues that Virgil, drawing upon a popular strain of anti-atomist and anti-Epicurean arguments in Greek philosophy, deploys atomic imagery as a symbol of cosmic and political disorder. The first chapter of this study investigates the development of metaphors and analogies in philosophical texts ranging from Aristotle to Cicero that equate atomism with cosmological caprice and instability. The following three chapters track how Virgil applies this interpretation of Epicurean physics to the Aeneid, in which chaotic atomic imagery is associated with various challenges to the poem's dominant narrative of divine order and Roman power. For Aeneas, the specter of atomic disorder arises at moments of distress and hesitation, while the association of various non-Trojan characters with atomism characterizes them as agents of violent disorder needing to be contained or vanquished. The final chapter summarizes findings, showing how Virgilian allusion to Lucretian physics often conflates poetic, political, and cosmological narratives, blurring the boundaries between their respective modes of discourse and revealing a general preference for hierarchical, teleological models of order"--
Categories: Literary Criticism

Lucretius I

Lucretius I

He reinterprets this classical text as an absolutely contemporary one defined by motion and gives us a genuinely new Lucretius - a Lucretius for today. Thomas Nail is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Denver.

Author: Thomas Nail

Publisher: EUP

ISBN: 1474434673

Category:

Page: 281

View: 281

The Most Original and Shocking Interpretation of Lucretius in the Last Forty Years, After centuries of abuse by modern atomists and mechanistic materialists, Thomas Nail argues that it is now time to return to De Rerum Natura from the perspective of a new materialism. Nail shows that some of the most important contributions of Lucretius' poem have been completely overlooked or misunderstood. He reinterprets this classical text as an absolutely contemporary one defined by motion and gives us a genuinely new Lucretius - a Lucretius for today. Book jacket.
Categories:

On the Nature of Marx s Things

On the Nature of Marx s Things

For Lucretius's use of military analogies in this part of the poem, see Philip De Lacy, “Distant Views: The Imagery of Lucretius ... see Don Fowler and P. G. Fowler, Lucretius on Atomic Motion: A Commentary on “De rerum natura” Book II, ...

Author: Jacques Lezra

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823279449

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 443

On the Nature of Marx’s Things is a major rethinking of the Marxian tradition, one based not on fixed things but on the inextricable interrelation between the material world and our language for it. Lezra traces to Marx’s earliest writings a subterranean, Lucretian practice that he calls necrophilological translation that continues to haunt Marx’s inheritors. This Lucretian strain, requiring that we think materiality in non-self-evident ways, as dynamic, aleatory, and always marked by its relation to language, raises central questions about ontology, political economy, and reading. “Lezra,” writes Vittorio Morfino in his preface, “transfers all of the power of the Althusserian encounter into his conception of translation.” Lezra’s expansive understanding of translation covers practices that put different natural and national languages into relation, often across periods, but also practices or mechanisms internal to each language. Obscured by later critical attention to the contradictory lexicons—of fetishism and of chrematistics—that Capital uses to describe how value accrues to commodities, and by the dialectical approach that’s framed Marx’s work since Engels sought to marry it to the natural philosophy of his time, necrophilological translation has a troubling, definitive influence in Marx’s thought and in his wake. It entails a radical revision of what counts as translation, and wholly new ways of imagining what an object is, of what counts as matter, value, sovereignty, mediation, and even number. In On the Nature of Marx’s Things a materialism “of the encounter,” as recent criticism in the vein of the late Althusser calls it, encounters Marxological value-form theory, post-Schmittian divisible sovereignty, object-oriented-ontologies and the critique of correlationism, and philosophies of translation and untranslatability in debt to Quine, Cassin, and Derrida. The inheritors of the problems with which Marx grapples range from Spinoza’s marranismo, through Melville’s Bartleby, through the development of a previously unexplored Freudian political theology shaped by the revolutionary traditions of Schiller and Verdi, through Adorno’s exilic antihumanism against Said’s cosmopolitan humanism, through today’s new materialisms. Ultimately, necrophilology draws the story of capital’s capture of difference away from the story of capital’s production of subjectivity. It affords concepts and procedures for dismantling the system of objects on which neoliberal capitalism stands: concrete, this-wordly things like commodities, but also such “objects” as debt traps, austerity programs, the marketization of risk; ideologies; the pedagogical, professional, legal, even familial institutions that produce and reproduce inequities today.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Central Works of Philosophy v1

Central Works of Philosophy v1

Lucretius on Atomic Motion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Long, A.A. 1986. Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Long, A. A. & D. N. Sedley 1987. The Hellenistic Philosophers.

Author: John Shand

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317494423

Category: Philosophy

Page: 278

View: 571

This collection of essays showcases the most important and influential philosophical works of the ancient and medieval period, roughly from 600 BC to AD 1600. Each chapter takes a particular work of philosophy and discusses its proponent, its content and central arguments. These are: Plato's Republic; Aristotle' Nichomachean Ethics; Lucretius' On the Nature of the Universe; Sextus Emperiicus' Outlines of Pyrrhonism; Plotinus' The Enneads; Augustine's City of God; Anselm's Proslogion; Aquinas' Summa Theologia; Duns Scotus' Ordinatio; William of Ockham's Summa Logicae .
Categories: Philosophy

Natural Theology in the Scientific Revolution

Natural Theology in the Scientific Revolution

In some of the most famous lines of the De Rerum Natura, Lucretius preserves the human capacity for reason by introducing ... of how Lucretius«s clinamen functions to facilitate free will, see D. P. Fowler, Lucretius on Atomic Motion: A ...

Author: Katherine Calloway

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317318248

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 786

In the seventeenth century scientific discoveries called into question established Christian theology. It has been claimed that contemporary thinkers contributed to this conflict model by using the discoveries of the natural world to prove the existence of God. Calloway challenges this view by close examination of five key texts of the period.
Categories: Philosophy

Epicureanism and the Gospel of John

Epicureanism and the Gospel of John

50 Lucretius, DRN 2.1–332; for a detailed commentary, see Don Fowler, Lucretius on Atomic Motion: A Commentary on De Rerum Natura Book ... 1.50, Lucretius, DRN 6.569–576; Adam Drozdek, Greek Philosophers as Theologians: The Divine Archē ...

Author: Fergus J. King

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161595455

Category: Religion

Page: 241

View: 387

The Gospel of John and Epicureanism share vocabulary and reject the conventions of Graeco-Roman theology. Would it then have been easy for an Epicurean to become a Christian or vice-versa? Fergus J. King suggests that such claims become unlikely when detailed analyses of the two traditions are set out and compared. The first step in his examination looks at evidence for potential engagement between the two traditions historically and geographically. Both traditions address concerns about the good life, death, and the divine. However, this correspondence soon unravels as their worldviews are far from identical. Shared terms (like Saviour), their respective rituals, and teaching about community life reveal substantial differences in ethos and behaviour.
Categories: Religion

A Quest for Remembrance

A Quest for Remembrance

Lucretius on Atomic Motion. A Commentary on De Rerum Natura Book Two, Lines 1–332. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Freudenberg, K. 2017. 'Seeing Marcellus in Aeneid 6'. Journal of Roman Studies 107: 116–39.

Author: Rachel Falconer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000682991

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 383

A Quest for Remembrance: The Underworld in Classical and Modern literature brings together a range of arguments exploring connections between the descent into the underworld, also known as katabasis, and various forms of memory. Its chapters investigate the uses of the descent topos both in antiquity and in the reception of classical literature in the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries. In the process, the volume explores how the hero’s quest into the underworld engages with the theme of recovering memories from the past. At the same time, we aim to foreground how the narrative format itself is concerned with forms of commemoration ranging from trans-cultural memory, remembering the literary and intellectual canon, to commemorating important historical events that might otherwise be forgotten. Through highlighting this duality this collection aims to introduce the descent narrative as its own literary genre, a ‘memorious genre’ related to but distinct from the quest narrative.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Rethinking Roman Alliance

Rethinking Roman Alliance

(2002) Lucretius on Atomic Motion: A Commentary on Lucretius De Rerum Natura Book Two, Lines 1–332. Oxford. Freyburger, G. (1980) “Le foedus d'amour,” in L'élégie romaine, ed. A. Thill. Paris: 105–16. (1983) Fides, étude sémantique et ...

Author: Bill Gladhill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107069749

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 448

Explores the vital links between social order and cosmology by examining the concept of foedus in Roman religion and literature.
Categories: History

Mirrors and Mirroring from Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

Mirrors and Mirroring from Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

Fowler, D. P. (2002), Lucretius on Atomic Motion: A Commentary on Lucretius De rerum natura 2.1–332, Oxford. Garani, M. (2007), Empedocles redivivus: Poetry and Analogy in Lucretius, New York and London. Godwin, J. (1986), Lucretius De ...

Author: Maria Gerolemou

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350101296

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 115

This volume examines mirrors and mirroring through a series of multidisciplinary essays, especially focusing on the intersection between technological and cultural dynamics of mirrors. The international scholars brought together here explore critical questions around the mirror as artefact and the phenomenon of mirroring. Beside the common visual registration of an action or inaction, in a two dimensional and reversed form, various types of mirrors often possess special abilities which can produce a distorted picture of reality, serving in this way illusion and falsehood. Part I looks at a selection of theory from ancient writers, demonstrating the concern to explore these same questions in antiquity. Part II considers the role reflections can play in forming ideas of gender and identity. Beyond the everyday, we see in Part III how oracular mirrors and magical mirrors reveal the invisible divine – prosthetics that allow us to look where the eye cannot reach. Finally, Part IV considers mirrors' roles in displaying the visible and invisible in antiquity and since.
Categories: History