Lenin s Tomb

Lenin s Tomb

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize One of the Best Books of the Year: The New York Times From the editor of The New Yorker: a riveting account of the collapse of the Soviet Union, which has become the standard book on the subject.

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780804173582

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 646

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize One of the Best Books of the Year: The New York Times From the editor of The New Yorker: a riveting account of the collapse of the Soviet Union, which has become the standard book on the subject. Lenin’s Tomb combines the global vision of the best historical scholarship with the immediacy of eyewitness journalism. Remnick takes us through the tumultuous 75-year period of Communist rule leading up to the collapse and gives us the voices of those who lived through it, from democratic activists to Party members, from anti-Semites to Holocaust survivors, from Gorbachev to Yeltsin to Sakharov. An extraordinary history of an empire undone, Lenin’s Tomb stands as essential reading for our times.
Categories: History

The Devil Problem

The Devil Problem

In this collection, Remnick's gift for character is sharper than ever, whether he writes about Gary Hart stumbling through life after Donna Rice or Mario Cuomo, who now presides over a Saturday morning radio talk show, fielding questions ...

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780804173636

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 448

View: 331

Readers know from his now classic Lenin's Tomb that Remnick is a superb portraitist who can bring his subjects to life and reveal them in such surprising ways as to justify comparison to Dickens, Balzac, or Proust. In this collection, Remnick's gift for character is sharper than ever, whether he writes about Gary Hart stumbling through life after Donna Rice or Mario Cuomo, who now presides over a Saturday morning radio talk show, fielding questions from crackpots, or about Michael Jordan's awesome return to the Chicago Bulls -- or Reggie Jackson's last times at bat. Remnick's portraits of such disparate characters as Alger Hiss and Ralph Ellison, Richard Nixon and Elaine Pagels, Gerry Adams and Marion Barry are unified by this extraordinary ability to create a living character, so that the pieces in this book, taken together, constitute a splendid pageant of the representative characters of our time.
Categories: Literary Collections

Resurrection

Resurrection

Offers a study of the Soviet Union in the aftermath of communism, tracing Russia's search for stability following the chaotic elections of 1996

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: IND:30000078420308

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 261

Offers a study of the Soviet Union in the aftermath of communism, tracing Russia's search for stability following the chaotic elections of 1996
Categories: History

Dancing on Bones

Dancing on Bones

Komsomolskaya Pravda, April 19, 1990, in David Remnick, Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire (New York: Vintage Books/ Random House, 1994), 202. 5. Thomas Sherlock, Historical Narratives in the Soviet Union and PostSoviet ...

Author: Katie Stallard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197575376

Category: Political Science

Page: 305

View: 571

History didn't end. Democracy didn't triumph. America's leading role in the world is no longer assured. Instead, autocrats and populist strongmen are on the rise, and the global order established after 1945 is under attack. This is the phenomenon Katie Stallard tackles in Dancing on Bones, as she examines how the leaders of China, Russia, and North Korea manipulate the past to serve the present and secure the future of authoritarian rule. Russia has annexed Crimea, started a war in eastern Ukraine, and repeatedly massed troops on its borders. China has stepped up war games near Taiwan and militarized the South China Sea, while North Korea has resumed missile testing and blood-curdling threats against the United States. These three states consistently top lists of threats to US and European security, and yet the leaders of all three insist that it is their country that is threatened, rewriting history and exploiting the memory of the wars of the last century to justify their actions and shore up popular support. Since coming to power, Xi Jinping has almost doubled the length of China's World War II, Vladimir Putin has elevated the memory of the Great Patriotic War to the status of a national religion, and Kim Jong Un has invested vast sums in rebuilding war museums in his impoverished state, while those who try to challenge the official version of history are silenced and jailed. But this didn't start with Putin, Xi, and Kim, and it won't end with them. Drawing on first-hand, on-the-ground reporting, Dancing on Bones argues that if we want to understand where these three nuclear powers are heading, we must understand the stories they are telling their citizens about the past.
Categories: Political Science

Reporting

Reporting

Here is Remnick on Don DeLillo, Philip Roth and The Sopranos; and here he is writing about Solzhenitsyn returning to Russia after nearly 20 years in exile, or on the failure of democracy in Mubarak’s Egypt.

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9780330471299

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 496

View: 111

David Remnick is a man much praised for his powers of observation, description and analysis, and Reporting contains his very best pieces from his first fifteen years as editor of The New Yorker. Here is Remnick on Don DeLillo, Philip Roth and The Sopranos; and here he is writing about Solzhenitsyn returning to Russia after nearly 20 years in exile, or on the failure of democracy in Mubarak’s Egypt. Without doubt one of America's most gifted and widely read journalists, Remnick's style combines compassion, empathy, exuberance and humour, and in Reporting he brings the written word to life, describing the world with extraordinary vividness and exceptional depth.
Categories: Literary Collections

King of the World

King of the World

King of the World is the story of an incredible rise to power, a book of battles fought inside the ring and out.

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781447289562

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 777

With an introduction by Salman Rushdie and an afterword by the author. It was the night of February 25, 1964. A cloud of cigar smoke drifted through the ring lights. Cassius Clay threw punches into the gray floating haze and waited for the bell. When Cassius Clay burst onto the sports scene in the 1950s, he broke the mould. He changed the world of sports and went on to change the world itself: from his early fights as Cassius Clay, the young, wiry man from Louisville, unwilling to play the noble and grateful warrior in a white world, to becoming Muhammad Ali, the voice of black America and the most recognized face on the planet. King of the World is the story of an incredible rise to power, a book of battles fought inside the ring and out. With grace and power, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer David Remnick tells of a transcendent athlete and entertainer, a rapper before rap was born. Ali was a mirror of his era, a dynamic figure in the racial and cultural clashes of his time and King of the World is a classic piece of non-fiction and a book worthy of America's most dynamic modern hero.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Resurrection

Resurrection

Here is Mikhail Gorbachev, his head still swimming from his plunge from reverence to ridicule. Here is Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the half-Jewish anti-Semite who conducts politics as loony performance art.

Author: David Remnick

Publisher:

ISBN: 0517362872

Category:

Page:

View: 346

Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Remnick chronicles the new Russia that emerged from the ash heap of the Soviet Union. From the siege of Parliament to the farcically tilted elections of 1996, from the rubble of Grozny to the grandiose wealth and naked corruption of today's Moscow, Remnick chronicles a society so racked by change that its citizens must daily ask themselves who they are, where they belong, and what they believe in. Remnick composes this panorama out of dozens of finely realized individual portraits. Here is Mikhail Gorbachev, his head still swimming from his plunge from reverence to ridicule. Here is Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the half-Jewish anti-Semite who conducts politics as loony performance art. And here is Boris Yeltsin, the tottering populist who is not above stealing elections. In Resurrection, they become the players in a drama so vast and moving that it deserves comparison with the best reportage of George Orwell and Michael Herr. "This is what happens when a good writer unleashes eye and ear on a story that moves with the speed of light. Resurrection has the feel of describing vast, historical change even as it is happening."--Chicago Tribune "From the Trade Paperback edition."
Categories:

Life Stories

Life Stories

Starting with light-fantastic evocations of glamorous and idiosyncratic figures of the twenties and thirties, such as Henry Luce and Isadora Duncan, and continuing to the present, with complex pictures of such contemporaries as Mikhail ...

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 9780307431387

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 624

View: 300

One of art's purest challenges is to translate a human being into words. The New Yorker has met this challenge more successfully and more originally than any other modern American journal. It has indelibly shaped the genre known as the Profile. Starting with light-fantastic evocations of glamorous and idiosyncratic figures of the twenties and thirties, such as Henry Luce and Isadora Duncan, and continuing to the present, with complex pictures of such contemporaries as Mikhail Baryshnikov and Richard Pryor, this collection of New Yorker Profiles presents readers with a portrait gallery of some of the most prominent figures of the twentieth century. These Profiles are literary-journalistic investigations into character and accomplishment, motive and madness, beauty and ugliness, and are unrivalled in their range, their variety of style, and their embrace of humanity. Including these twenty-eight profiles: “Mr. Hunter’s Grave” by Joseph Mitchell “Secrets of the Magus” by Mark Singer “Isadora” by Janet Flanner “The Soloist” by Joan Acocella “Time . . . Fortune . . . Life . . . Luce” by Walcott Gibbs “Nobody Better, Better Than Nobody” by Ian Frazier “The Mountains of Pi” by Richard Preston “Covering the Cops” by Calvin Trillin “Travels in Georgia” by John McPhee “The Man Who Walks on Air” by Calvin Tomkins “A House on Gramercy Park” by Geoffrey Hellman “How Do You Like It Now, Gentlemen?” by Lillian Ross “The Education of a Prince” by Alva Johnston “White Like Me” by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. “Wunderkind” by A. J. Liebling “Fifteen Years of The Salto Mortale” by Kenneth Tynan “The Duke in His Domain” by Truman Capote “A Pryor Love” by Hilton Als “Gone for Good” by Roger Angell “Lady with a Pencil” by Nancy Franklin “Dealing with Roseanne” by John Lahr “The Coolhunt” by Malcolm Gladwell “Man Goes to See a Doctor” by Adam Gopnik “Show Dog” by Susan Orlean “Forty-One False Starts” by Janet Malcolm “The Redemption” by Nicholas Lemann “Gore Without a Script” by Nicholas Lemann “Delta Nights” by Bill Buford
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Last Empire

The Last Empire

2. “ Vozvrashchenie prezidenta SSSR , ” Pravda , August 23 , 1991 . 3. Anatolii Cherniaev , Sovmestnyi iskhod . Dnevnik dvukh èpokh , 1972–1991 gody ( Moscow , 2008 ) , 984 ; Lenin's Tomb : The Last Days of the Soviet Empire ( New York ...

Author: Serhii Plokhy

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780465097920

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 259

On Christmas Day, 1991, President George H. W. Bush addressed the nation to declare an American victory in the Cold War: earlier that day Mikhail Gorbachev had resigned as the first and last Soviet president. The enshrining of that narrative, one in which the end of the Cold War was linked to the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the triumph of democratic values over communism, took center stage in American public discourse immediately after Bush's speech and has persisted for decades -- with disastrous consequences for American standing in the world. As prize-winning historian Serhii Plokhy reveals in The Last Empire, the collapse of the Soviet Union was anything but the handiwork of the United States. On the contrary, American leaders dreaded the possibility that the Soviet Union -- weakened by infighting and economic turmoil -- might suddenly crumble, throwing all of Eurasia into chaos. Bush was firmly committed to supporting his ally and personal friend Gorbachev, and remained wary of nationalist or radical leaders such as recently elected Russian President Boris Yeltsin. Fearing what might happen to the large Soviet nuclear arsenal in the event of the union's collapse, Bush stood by Gorbachev as he resisted the growing independence movements in Ukraine, Moldova, and the Caucasus. Plokhy's detailed, authoritative account shows that it was only after the movement for independence of the republics had gained undeniable momentum on the eve of the Ukrainian vote for independence that fall that Bush finally abandoned Gorbachev to his fate. Drawing on recently declassified documents and original interviews with key participants, Plokhy presents a bold new interpretation of the Soviet Union's final months and argues that the key to the Soviet collapse was the inability of the two largest Soviet republics, Russia and Ukraine, to agree on the continuing existence of a unified state. By attributing the Soviet collapse to the impact of American actions, US policy makers overrated their own capacities in toppling and rebuilding foreign regimes. Not only was the key American role in the demise of the Soviet Union a myth, but this misplaced belief has guided -- and haunted -- American foreign policy ever since.
Categories: History

Unglued Empire

Unglued Empire

Lenin's Tomb , The Last Days of the Soviet Empire , Random House , New York , 1993 . pp . 144-146 . 7. Michael Dobbs as in Note 6 , p . C - 12 . Leonid Parfyonov is being quoted . 8. Jeff Sommers , " USSR : A Door Opens , " Columbia ...

Author: Gladys D. Ganley

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 1567501974

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 234

View: 314

. . .Ganley has marshaled an extrodinary range and volume of information and presents the story with bolth clarity and drama. Unglued Empire offers a gold mine of case-study data for scholars analyzing the interplay of politics and modern communication technology. . . -^ITechnology and Culture There is no doubt that the growing availability of television and its technology, which made it possible to report scenes instantly, did have an impact on the collapse of the Soviet Union. Mikhail Gorbachev decided that his country needed a dose of openness or Glasnost to modernize society and make the people more supportive of his efforts. In the end, more information about the outside world as well as the inside world helped to bring down the communist party and the Soviet government. This book documents this process, showing how the media's ready availability became such a divisive force in the Soviet Union. Instead of creating a more structured, rigid regime, it did just the opposite. The Soviet Union may well have collapsed of its own weight sooner or later, but there is no doubt that the media, technology and communications accelerated the process, a form of uskoreniie that Gorbachev never intended. Many of the events described in this study have application to other researchers and government officials. The study makes it possible to understand some of the new challenges that regimes wary of criticism will have to face in the future.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines