Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America

Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America

This book places into modern context the information by which North American mammalian paleontologists recognize, divide, calibrate, and discuss intervals of mammalian evolution known as North American Land Mammal Ages.

Author: Michael O. Woodburne

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231503785

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 122

This book places into modern context the information by which North American mammalian paleontologists recognize, divide, calibrate, and discuss intervals of mammalian evolution known as North American Land Mammal Ages. It incorporates new information on the systematic biology of the fossil record and utilizes the many recent advances in geochronologic methods and their results. The book describes the increasingly highly resolved stratigraphy into which all available temporally significant data and applications are integrated. Extensive temporal coverage includes the Lancian part of the Late Cretaceous, and geographical coverage includes information from Mexico, an integral part of the North American fauna, past and present.
Categories: Science

Fossil Mammals of Asia

Fossil Mammals of Asia

Neogene Biostratigraphy and Chronology Xiaoming Wang, Lawrence J. Flynn, Mikael Fortelius. Qiu, Z.-d., X.-m. Wang, and Q. Li. 2006. ... In Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America: Biostratigraphy and Geochronology, ed.

Author: Xiaoming Wang

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231520829

Category: Science

Page: 752

View: 336

Fossil Mammals of Asia, edited by and with contributions from world-renowned scholars, is the first major work devoted to the late Cenozoic (Neogene) mammalian biostratigraphy and geochronology of Asia. This volume employs cutting-edge biostratigraphic and geochemical dating methods to map the emergence of mammals across the continent. Written by specialists working in a variety of Asian regions, it uses data from many basins with spectacular fossil records to establish a groundbreaking geochronological framework for the evolution of land mammals. Asia's violent tectonic history has resulted in some of the world's most varied topography, and its high mountain ranges and intense monsoon climates have spawned widely diverse environments over time. These geologic conditions profoundly influenced the evolution of Asian mammals and their migration into Europe, Africa, and North America. Focusing on amazing new fossil finds that have redefined Asia's role in mammalian evolution, this volume synthesizes information from a range of field studies on Asian mammals and biostratigraphy, helping to trace the histories and movements of extinct and extant mammals from various major groups and all northern continents, and providing geologists with a richer understanding of a variety of Asian terrains.
Categories: Science

Mammalogy

Mammalogy

Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America: Biostratigraphy and Geochronology. Columbia University Press, NY. Woodburne, MO (ed.). 2004b. Global events and the North American mammalian biochronology, 315–343, in Late ...

Author: Professor Emeritus Northern Arizona University Terry A Vaughan

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

ISBN: 9781284032185

Category: Science

Page: 750

View: 493

Mammalogy is the study of mammals from the diverse biological viewpoints of structure, function, evolutionary history, behavior, ecology, classification, and economics. Thoroughly updated, the Sixth Edition of Mammalogy explains and clarifies the subject as a unified whole. The text begins by defining mammals and summarizing their origins. It moves on to discuss the orders and families of mammals with comprehensive coverage on the fossil history, current distribution, morphological characteristics, and basic behavior and ecology of each family of mammals. The third part of the text progresses to discuss special topics such as mammalian echolocation, physiology, behavior, ecology, and zoogeography. The text concludes with two additional chapters, previously available online, that cover mammalian domestication and mammalian disease and zoonoses.
Categories: Science

Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona

Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona

Cenozoic mammals of North America: Geochronology and biostratigraphy: Berkeley, University of California Press, p. ... M. O., ed., Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic mammals of North America: Biostratigraphy and geochronology: New York, ...

Author: Andrew B. Heckert

Publisher: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

ISBN:

Category: Animals, Fossil

Page: 209

View: 703

Categories: Animals, Fossil

Evolutionary History of Bats

Evolutionary History of Bats

Mammalian biochronology of the Arikareean through Hemphillian interval (Late Oligocene through Early Pliocene epochs). In Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America Biostrati- graphy and Geochronology, ed. M. O. Woodburne.

Author: Gregg F. Gunnell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107376823

Category: Science

Page:

View: 472

Advances in morphological and molecular methods continue to uncover new information on the origin and evolution of bats. Presenting some of the most remarkable discoveries and research involving living and fossil bats, this book explores their evolutionary history from a range of perspectives. Phylogenetic studies based on both molecular and morphological data have established a framework of evolutionary relationships that provides a context for understanding many aspects of bat biology and diversification. In addition to detailed studies of the relationships and diversification of bats, the topics covered include the mechanisms and evolution of powered flight, evolution and enhancement of echolocation, feeding ecology, population genetic structure, ontogeny and growth of facial form, functional morphology and evolution of body size. The book also examines the fossil history of bats from their beginnings over 50 million years ago to their diversification into one of the most globally wide-spread orders of mammals living today.
Categories: Science

Cenozoic Vertebrate Tracks and Traces

Cenozoic Vertebrate Tracks and Traces

... R.J., 2004, The Blancan, Irvingtonian and Rancholabrean Mammal Ages; in Woodburne, M.O., ed., Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic mammals of North America: Biostratigraphy and geochronology: New York, Columbia University Press, p. 232-314.

Author: Spencer G. Lucas

Publisher: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

ISBN:

Category: Footprints, Fossil

Page: 330

View: 794

Categories: Footprints, Fossil

Examining Evolutionary Trends in Equus and its Close Relatives from Five Continents

Examining Evolutionary Trends in Equus and its Close Relatives from Five Continents

“The Blancan, Irvingtonian, and Rancholabrean Mammal Ages,” in Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America: Biostratigraphy and Geochronology, ed M. O. Woodburne (New York, NY: Columbia University Press), ...

Author: Raymond Louis Bernor

Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

ISBN: 9782889635559

Category:

Page:

View: 985

Evolution of the horse has been an often-cited primary example of evolution, as well as one of the classic and important stories in paleontology for over a century and a half, due to their rich fossil record across 5 continents: North America, South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. The recent horse has served a profound role in human ancestry, including agriculture, commerce, sport, transport, warfare, and in prehistory, for the subsistence of humans. Many studies have examined the evolution of the Equidae and chronicled the striking changes in skulls, dentition, limbs, and body size which have long been perceived to be a response to environmental shifts through time. Most comprehensive studies heretofore have: (1) focused on the “Great Transformation”- changes that occurred in the early Miocene, (2) involved tracking long-term diversity or paleoecological trends on a single continent or within a geographical locality, or (3) concentrated on the 3-toed hipparions. The Plio–Pleistocene evolutionary stage of horse evolution is punctuated by the great climatic fluctuations of the Quaternary beginning 2.6 Ma which influenced Equus evolution, biogeographic dispersion and adaptation on a nearly global scale. The evolutionary biology of Equus evolution across its entire range remains relatively poorly understood and often highly controversial. Some of this lack of understanding is due to assumptions that have arisen because of the relatively derived craniodental and postcranial anatomy of Equus and its close relatives which has seemed to imply that that these forms occupied relatively homogenous and narrow dietary and locomotor niches - notions that have not been adequately addressed and rigorously tested. Other challenges have revolved around teasing apart environmentally-driven adaptation versus phylogenetically defined morphological change. Geochronologic age control of localities, geographic provinces and continents has improved, but in no way is absolute and can be reexamined in our proposed volume. Temporal resolution for paleodietary, paleohabitat and paleoecological interpretations are also challenging for understanding the evolution of Equus. Our proposed volume attempts to assemble a group of experts who will address multiple dimensions of Equus’ evolution in time and space.
Categories:

THE SYSTEMATICS OF NORTH AMERICAN PECCARIES MAMMALIA ARTIODACTYLA TAYASSUIDAE

THE SYSTEMATICS OF NORTH AMERICAN PECCARIES  MAMMALIA  ARTIODACTYLA  TAYASSUIDAE

Miocene and Pliocene Mammalian Faunas Near Valentine, Survey of Bridgerian Artiodactyla, including description of a skull Nebraska. ... Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic mammals of North America: biostratigraphy and geochronology: New York, ...

Author: DONALD R. PROTHERO

Publisher: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 86

View: 398

Categories: Science

Fossil Horses of South America

Fossil Horses of South America

In: Woodburne MO (ed) Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America. Biostratigraphy and Geochronology, Columbia University Press, New York, pp 169–231 Van Valen LM (1964) Age in two fossil horse populations.

Author: José Luis Prado

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319558776

Category: Science

Page: 150

View: 895

This book provides an update on the phylogeny, systematics and ecology of horses in South America based on data provided over the past three decades. The contemporary South American mammalian communities were shaped by the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama and by the profound climatic oscillations during the Pleistocene. Horses were a conspicuous group of immigrant mammals from North America that arrived in South America during the Pleistocene. This group is represented by 2 genera, Hippidion and Equus, which include small species (Hippidion devillei, H. saldiasi, E. andium and E. insulatus) and large forms (Equus neogeus and H. principale). Both groups arrived in South America via 2 different routes. One model designed to explain this migration indicates that the small forms used the Andes corridor, while larger horses used the eastern route and arrived through some coastal areas. Molecular dating (ancient DNA) suggests that the South American horses separated from the North American taxa (caballines and the New World stilt-legged horse) after 3.6 - 3.2 Ma, consistent with the final formation of the Panamanian Isthmus. Recent studies of stable isotopes in these horses indicate an extensive range of 13C values cover closed woodlands to C4 grasslands. This plasticity agrees with the hypothesis that generalist species and open biome specialist species from North America indicate a positive migration through South America.
Categories: Science

After the Dinosaurs

After the Dinosaurs

Mammalian biochronology of the Arikareean through Hemphillian interval (late Oligocene through early Pliocene epochs). In M. O. Woodburne, ed., Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Mammals of North America: Biostratigraphy and Geochronology, ...

Author: Donald R. Prothero

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253000552

Category: Science

Page: 370

View: 829

A fascinating study of the thousands of new animal species that walked in the footsteps of the dinosaurs—and the climate changes that brought them forth. The fascinating group of animals called dinosaurs became extinct some 65 million years ago (except for their feathered descendants). In their place evolved an enormous variety of land creatures, especially mammals, which in their way were every bit as remarkable as their Mesozoic cousins. The Age of Mammals, the Cenozoic Era, has never had its Jurassic Park, but it was an amazing time in earth’s history, populated by a wonderful assortment of bizarre animals. The rapid evolution of thousands of species of mammals brought forth many incredible creatures―including our own ancestors. Their story is part of a larger story of new life emerging from the greenhouse conditions of the Mesozoic, warming up dramatically about 55 million years ago, and then cooling rapidly so that 33 million years ago the glacial ice returned. The earth’s vegetation went through equally dramatic changes, from tropical jungles in Montana and forests at the poles. Life in the sea underwent striking evolution reflecting global climate change, including the emergence of such creatures as giant sharks, seals, sea lions, dolphins, and whales. Engaging and insightful, After the Dinosaurs is a book for everyone who has an abiding fascination with the remarkable life of the past.
Categories: Science