Italian Women Writers from the Renaissance to the Present

Italian Women Writers from the Renaissance to the Present

7 Although many works by "serious" Italian women writers typically enjoy large audiences, they have only rarely captured the attention of key gatekeeper intellectuals (the vast majority of whom are of course male).

Author: Maria Marotti

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271041254

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 297

View: 970

Categories: Literary Criticism

Italian Women Writers

Italian Women Writers

Italian feminist writing in the 1970s and early 1980s was overwhelmingly autobiographical and hostile to questions of ... feminist writers in the 1970s , Maraini denounced literary form as oppressive and foreign to women , an instrument ...

Author: Rinaldina Russell

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313283478

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 518

View: 288

"This important work, effectively presenting a wealth of new material, is suitable for all Italian literature and women's studies collections." ARBA
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Contemporary Italian Women Writers and Traces of the Fantastic

Contemporary Italian Women Writers and Traces of the Fantastic

Not only have two of the leading lights of twentieth century Italian women's writing, Elsa Morante and Anna Maria Ortese, begun to shine more brightly for critics as authors of the fantastic, but new light has been shed on writers in ...

Author: Danielle Hipkins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351195331

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 793

"Contemporary fantastic fiction, particularly that written by women, often challenges traditional literary practice. At the same time the predominantly male-authored canon of fantastic literature offers a problematic range of gender stereotypes for female authors to 're-write'. Fantastic tropes, of space in particular, enable three important contemporary Italian female writers (Paola Capriolo, b. 1962; Francesca Duranti, b. 1935 and Rossana Ombres, b. 1931) to encounter and counter anxieties about writing from the female subject. All three writers begin by exploring the hermetic, fantastic space of enclosure with a critical, or troubled, eye, but eventually opt for wider national, and often international spaces, in which only a 'fantastic trace' remains. This shift mirrors their own increasingly confident distance from male-authored literary models and demonstrates the creative input that these writers bring to the literary canon, by redefining its generic boundaries."
Categories: Literary Criticism

Italian Women Writers

Italian Women Writers

delle donne on 16 March 1877, Neera even belittles Italian women writers, describing them as “lost and aggressive angels who dip the tip of their wings with ink,”21 a comment that shares Aleramo's negative view of Italian women writers ...

Author: Katharine Mitchell

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442665644

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 305

Post-Unification Italy saw an unprecedented rise of the middle classes, an expansion in the production of print culture, and increased access to education and professions for women, particularly in urban areas. Although there was still widespread illiteracy, especially among women in both rural and urban areas, there emerged a generation of women writers whose domestic fiction and journalism addressed a growing female readership. This study looks at the work of three of the most significant women writers of the period: La Marchesa Colombi, Neera, and Matilde Serao. These writers, whose works had been largely forgotten for much of the last century, only to be rediscovered by the Italian feminist movement of the 1970s, were widely read and received considerable critical acclaim in their day. In their realist fiction and journalism, these professional women writers documented and brought to light the ways in which women participated in everyday life in the newly independent Italy, and how their experiences differed profoundly from those of men. Katharine Mitchell shows how these three authors, while hardly radical emancipationists, offered late-nineteenth-century readers an implicit feminist intervention and a legitimate means of approaching and engaging with the burning social and political issues of the day regarding “the woman question” – women’s access to education and the professions, legal rights, and suffrage. Through close examinations of these authors and a selection of their works – and with reference to their broader artistic, socio-historical, and geo-political contexts – Mitchell not only draws attention to their authentic representations of contemporary social and historical realities, but also considers their important role as a cultural medium and catalyst for social change.
Categories: History

Italian Women Writers 1800 2000

Italian Women Writers  1800   2000

Italy's particular geopolitical position, with its southern borders central to the most recent phenomenon of immigration, ... Italian Women Writers 1800–2000: Boundaries, Borders, and Transgression investigates narrative, autobiography, ...

Author: Patrizia Sambuco

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781611477917

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 426

This book investigates narrative, autobiography, and poetry by Italian women writers from the nineteenth century to today and considers the topics of boundaries and borders in their writings.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Nineteenth Century Italian Women Writers and the Woman Question

Nineteenth Century Italian Women Writers and the Woman Question

Writing and Performing Female Identity in Italian Culture, edited by Virginia Picchietti and Laura A. Salsini, London, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, pp. 43–57. Cutrufelli, Maria Rosa. Scritture, scrittrici. Rome, Longanesi, 1988.

Author: Catherine Ramsey-Portolano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000190823

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

View: 917

Nineteenth-Century Italian Women Writers and the Woman Question focuses on the literary, journalistic and epistolary production of Italian woman writer Neera, pseudonym for Anna Radius Zuccari, one of the most prolific and successful women writers of late nineteenth-century Italy. This study proposes to bring Neera out of the shadows of literary marginality to which she has long been confined by analyzing her contribution to literary and cultural debates as testimony to the pivotal role she played in the creation of a female literary voice within the Italian fin-de-siècle context. Drawing from the Anglo-American feminist critical tradition; modern Italian feminist theory on the maternal order and sexual difference; and a close reading of Neera’s literary, theoretical and epistolary writings this volume examines Neera’s work from a three-pronged perspective: as promoter of a maternal order in contrast to the existent paternal order, as one of few women writers to participate actively in Italy’s verismo movement and as epistolary correspondent of leading representatives within fin-de-siècle Italian literary and journalistic circles. Nineteenth-Century Italian Women Writers and the Woman Question represents the first monographic volume in English dedicated exclusively to this important Italian woman writer, repositioning her within the Italian literary landscape and canon.
Categories: Literary Criticism

A History of Women s Writing in Italy

A History of Women s Writing in Italy

Writing in other genres In the interests of concision and coherence , the present discussion has concentrated on the two fictional forms in which women wrote in suffi- cient numbers for comparative analysis to be feasible , pastoral ...

Author: Letizia Panizza

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521578132

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 382

View: 338

This volume offers a comprehensive account of writing by women in Italy.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Claiming a Tradition

Claiming a Tradition

Largely neglected until recently, these women's family narratives compel a reconsideration of what it means to be a woman and an ethnic in America. Bona discusses the novels in pairs according to their focus on Italian American life.

Author: Mary Jo Bona

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809322587

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 247

Mary Jo Bona reconstructs the literary history and examines the narrative techniques of eight Italian American women's novels from 1940 to the present. Largely neglected until recently, these women's family narratives compel a reconsideration of what it means to be a woman and an ethnic in America. Bona discusses the novels in pairs according to their focus on Italian American life. She first examines the traditions of italianitá (a flavor of things Italian) that inform and enhance works of fiction. The novelists in that tradition were Mari Tomasi (Like Lesser Gods, 1949) and Marion Benasutti (No Steady Job for Papa, 1966). Bona then turns to later novels that highlight the Italian American belief in the family's honor and reputation. Conflicts between generations, specifically between autocratic fathers and their children, are central to Octavia Waldo's 1961 A Cup of the Sun and Josephine Gattuso Hendin's 1988 The Right Thing to Do. Even when writers choose to steer away from the familial focus, Bona notes, their developmental narratives trace the reintegration of characters suffering from a crisis of cultural identity. Relating the characters' struggles to their relationship to the family, Bona examines Diana Cavallo's 1961 A Bridge of Leaves and Dorothy Bryant's 1978 Miss Giardino. Bona then discusses two innovative novels—Helen Barolini's 1979 Umbertina and Tina De Rosa's 1980 Paper Fish—both of which feature a granddaughter who invokes her grandmother, a godparent figure. Through Barolini's feminist and De Rosa's modernist perspectives, both novels present a young girl developing artistically. Closing with a discussion of the contemporary terrain Italian American women traverse, Bona examines such topics as sexual identity when it meets cultural identity and the inclusion of italianitá when Italian American identity is not central to the story. Italian American women writers, she concludes, continue in the 1980s and 1990s to focus on the interplay between cultural identity and women's development.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Breaking Open

Breaking Open

In this work, prominent Italian American creative women discuss the ways their heritage has impacted their works.

Author: Mary Ann Vigilante Mannino

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 1557532435

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 374

View: 846

In this work, prominent Italian American creative women discuss the ways their heritage has impacted their works. They discuss the ways that their childhood memories of immigrants and their practices have been a strong foundation for their creativity.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Feminist Encyclopedia of Italian Literature

The Feminist Encyclopedia of Italian Literature

The Woman Writer in Late - Nineteenth - Century Italy : Gen- der and Formation of Literary Identity , by Lucienne Kroha ( Lewiston , N.Y .: The Edwin Mellen Press , 1992 ) , examines the works of Italian women writers caught between the ...

Author: Rinaldina Russell

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313294356

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 199

Entries for authors, works, themes, and other topics trace the feminist response to Italian literature from the Middle Ages to the present.
Categories: Literary Criticism