Insanely Great

Insanely Great

The Newsweek technology writer chronicles the rise of the Mac, a machine that revolutionized the computer industry and American society. Original.

Author: Steven Levy

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: UOM:39015050283962

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 328

View: 404

The Newsweek technology writer chronicles the rise of the Mac, a machine that revolutionized the computer industry and American society. Original.
Categories: Business & Economics

Milestones in Computer Science and Information Technology

Milestones in Computer Science and Information Technology

Insanely Great : The Life and Times of the Macintosh , the Computer That Changed Everything . New York : Viking ; 1994. 328p . An overstatement , perhaps , but not by much . Lewis , F. L. Applied Optimal Control and Estimation .

Author: Edwin D. Reilly

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 1573565210

Category: Computers

Page: 380

View: 404

Contains over 650 entries detailing the evolution of computing, including companies, machines, developments, inventions, parts, languages, and theories.
Categories: Computers

Crypto

Crypto

Crypto tells the inside story of how a group of "crypto rebels"—nerds and visionaries turned freedom fighters—teamed up with corporate interests to beat Big Brother and ensure our privacy on the Internet.

Author: Steven Levy

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101199466

Category: Computers

Page: 368

View: 939

If you've ever made a secure purchase with your credit card over the Internet, then you have seen cryptography, or "crypto", in action. From Stephen Levy—the author who made "hackers" a household word—comes this account of a revolution that is already affecting every citizen in the twenty-first century. Crypto tells the inside story of how a group of "crypto rebels"—nerds and visionaries turned freedom fighters—teamed up with corporate interests to beat Big Brother and ensure our privacy on the Internet. Levy's history of one of the most controversial and important topics of the digital age reads like the best futuristic fiction.
Categories: Computers

Computer

Computer

74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 Steven Levy, Insanely Great: The Life and Times ofMacintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything (London, 1995), p. 70. ... (http://library.stanford.edu/mac/, accessed 1 August 2006).

Author: Paul Atkinson

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9781861897374

Category: Computers

Page: 256

View: 733

The pixelated rectangle we spend most of our day staring at in silence is not the television as many long feared, but the computer—the ubiquitous portal of work and personal lives. At this point, the computer is almost so common we don’t notice it in our view. It’s difficult to envision that not that long ago it was a gigantic, room-sized structure only to be accessed by a few inspiring as much awe and respect as fear and mystery. Now that the machine has decreased in size and increased in popular use, the computer has become a prosaic appliance, little-more noted than a toaster. These dramatic changes, from the daunting to the ordinary, are captured in Computer by design historian Paul Atkinson. Here, Atkinson chronicles the changes in physical design of the computer and shows how these changes in design are related to changes in popular attitude. Atkinson is fascinated by how the computer has been represented and promoted in advertising. For example, in contrast to ads from the 1970s and ’80s, today’s PC is very PC—genderless, and largely status free. Computer also considers the role of the computer as a cultural touchstone, as evidenced by its regular appearance in popular culture, including the iconography of the space age, HAL from 2001: A Space Odyssey, James Bond’s gadgetry, and Stars War and Star Trek. Computer covers many issues ignored by other histories of computing, which have focused on technology and the economics involved in their production, but rarely on the role of fashion in the physical design and promotion of computers and their general reception. The book will appeal to professionals and students of design and technology as well as those interested in the history of computers and how they have shaped—and been shaped by—our lives.
Categories: Computers

Places of Invention

Places of Invention

On the development of the Macintosh, see Steven Levy, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything (New York: Viking Penguin, 1994). 41. Susan Kare."Design Biography," accessed 23January 2014, ...

Author: Arthur P. Molella

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 9781935623687

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 629

The companion book to an upcoming museum exhibition of the same name, Places of Invention seeks to answer timely questions about the nature of invention and innovation: What is it about some places that sparks invention and innovation? Is it simply being at the right place at the right time, or is it more than that? How does “place”—whether physical, social, or cultural—support, constrain, and shape innovation? Why does invention flourish in one spot but struggle in another, even very similar location? In short: Why there? Why then? Places of Invention frames current and historic conversation on the relationship between place and creativity, citing extensive scholarship in the area and two decades of investigation and study from the National Museum of American History’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation. The book is built around six place case studies: Hartford, CT, late 1800s; Hollywood, CA, 1930s; Medical Alley, MN, 1950s; Bronx, NY,1970s; Silicon Valley, CA, 1970s–1980s; and Fort Collins, CO, 2010s. Interspersed with these case studies are dispatches from three “learning labs” detailing Smithsonian Affiliate museums’ work using Places of Invention as a model for documenting local invention and innovation. Written by exhibition curators, each part of the book focuses on the central thesis that invention is everywhere and fueled by unique combinations of creative people, ready resources, and inspiring surroundings. Like the locations it explores, Places of Invention shows how the history of invention can be a transformative lens for understanding local history and cultivating creativity on scales of place ranging from the personal to the national and beyond.
Categories: History

Insanely Great

Insanely Great

Written by Newsweek's senior editor, the book is loaded with anecdotes and insights and peppered with sharp commentary.

Author: Steven Levy

Publisher: Turtleback

ISBN: 0613922115

Category:

Page:

View: 326

This sweeping discourse on the MacIntosh computer and its impact on the high-tech revolution includes a new Afterward about how Steve Jobs reinvented Apple once more. Written by "Newsweek's" senior editor, the book is loaded with anecdotes and insights and peppered with sharp commentary.
Categories:

The Code

The Code

On the history of the Macintosh, see Steven Levy, Insanely Great. The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything (New York: Viking, 1994); Andy Hertzfeld, Revolution in the Valley. The Insanely Great Story of How ...

Author: Margaret O'Mara

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780399562198

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 512

View: 467

One of New York Magazine's best books on Silicon Valley! The true, behind-the-scenes history of the people who built Silicon Valley and shaped Big Tech in America Long before Margaret O'Mara became one of our most consequential historians of the American-led digital revolution, she worked in the White House of Bill Clinton and Al Gore in the earliest days of the commercial Internet. There she saw firsthand how deeply intertwined Silicon Valley was with the federal government--and always had been--and how shallow the common understanding of the secrets of the Valley's success actually was. Now, after almost five years of pioneering research, O'Mara has produced the definitive history of Silicon Valley for our time, the story of mavericks and visionaries, but also of powerful institutions creating the framework for innovation, from the Pentagon to Stanford University. It is also a story of a community that started off remarkably homogeneous and tight-knit and stayed that way, and whose belief in its own mythology has deepened into a collective hubris that has led to astonishing triumphs as well as devastating second-order effects. Deploying a wonderfully rich and diverse cast of protagonists, from the justly famous to the unjustly obscure, across four generations of explosive growth in the Valley, from the forties to the present, O'Mara has wrestled one of the most fateful developments in modern American history into magnificent narrative form. She is on the ground with all of the key tech companies, chronicling the evolution in their offerings through each successive era, and she has a profound fingertip feel for the politics of the sector and its relation to the larger cultural narrative about tech as it has evolved over the years. Perhaps most impressive, O'Mara has penetrated the inner kingdom of tech venture capital firms, the insular and still remarkably old-boy world that became the cockpit of American capitalism and the crucible for bringing technological innovation to market, or not. The transformation of big tech into the engine room of the American economy and the nexus of so many of our hopes and dreams--and, increasingly, our nightmares--can be understood, in Margaret O'Mara's masterful hands, as the story of one California valley. As her majestic history makes clear, its fate is the fate of us all.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Iconic Designs

Iconic Designs

8 Steven Levy, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, The Computer That Changed Everything (London: Penguin, 1995), p. 4. 9 Gitta Soloman, 'Inside Story', Design (Autumn 1998): 42. 10 Joe O'Halloran, 'OK Computer?

Author: Grace Lees-Maffei

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780857853530

Category: Design

Page: 240

View: 531

Iconic Designs is a beautifully designed and illustrated guide to fifty classic 'things' – designs that we find in the city, in our homes and offices, on page and screen, and in our everyday lives. In her introduction, Grace Lees-Maffei explores what makes a design 'iconic', and fifty essays by leading design and cultural critics tell the story of each iconic 'thing', its innovative and unique qualities, and its journey to classic status. Subjects range from the late 19th century to the present day, and include the Sydney Opera House, the Post-It Note, Coco Chanel's classic suit, the Sony WalkmanTM, Hello KittyTM, the typeface Helvetica, the Ford Model T, Harry Beck's diagrammatic map of the London Underground and the Apple iMac G3. This handsome volume provides a treasure trove of 'stories' that will shed new light on the iconic designs that we use without thinking, aspire to possess, love or hate (or love to hate) and which form part of the fabric of our everyday lives.
Categories: Design

The Software Arts

The Software Arts

Insanely great” was a phrase Jobs frequently used; see Steven Levy, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything (New York: Penguin Books, 2000). 12.

Author: Warren Sack

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262352376

Category: Computers

Page: 400

View: 452

An alternative history of software that places the liberal arts at the very center of software's evolution. In The Software Arts, Warren Sack offers an alternative history of computing that places the arts at the very center of software's evolution. Tracing the origins of software to eighteenth-century French encyclopedists' step-by-step descriptions of how things were made in the workshops of artists and artisans, Sack shows that programming languages are the offspring of an effort to describe the mechanical arts in the language of the liberal arts. Sack offers a reading of the texts of computing—code, algorithms, and technical papers—that emphasizes continuity between prose and programs. He translates concepts and categories from the liberal and mechanical arts—including logic, rhetoric, grammar, learning, algorithm, language, and simulation—into terms of computer science and then considers their further translation into popular culture, where they circulate as forms of digital life. He considers, among other topics, the “arithmetization” of knowledge that presaged digitization; today's multitude of logics; the history of demonstration, from deduction to newer forms of persuasion; and the post-Chomsky absence of meaning in grammar. With The Software Arts, Sack invites artists and humanists to see how their ideas are at the root of software and invites computer scientists to envision themselves as artists and humanists.
Categories: Computers

Everything All the Time Everywhere

Everything  All the Time  Everywhere

See Steven Levy , Insanely Great : The Life and Times of Macintosh , the Computer that Changed Everything ( London : Penguin , 2000 ) , p . 18off . 20. Quoted in Jodi Dean , Publicity's Secret : How Technoculture Capitalises on ...

Author: Stuart Jeffries

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781788738224

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 225

A radical new history of a dangerous idea Post-Modernity is the creative destruction that has shattered our present times into fragments. It dynamited modernism which had dominated the western world for most of the 20th century. Post-modernism stood for everything modernism rejected: fun, exuberance, irresponsibility. But beneath its glitzy surface, post-modernism had a dirty secret: it was the fig leaf for a rapacious new kind of capitalism. It was also the forcing ground of the 'post truth', by means of which western values got turned upside down. But where do these ideas come from and how have they impacted on the world? In his brilliant history of a dangerous idea, Stuart Jeffries tells a narrative that starts in the early 1970s and continue to today. He tells this history through a riotous gallery that includes David Bowie, the Ipod, Frederic Jameson, the demolition of Pruit-Igoe, Madonna, Post-Fordism, Jeff Koon's 'Rabbit', Deleuze and Guattari, the Nixon Shock, The Bowery series, Judith Butler, Las Vegas, Margaret Thatcher, Grand Master Flash, I Love Dick, the RAND Corporation, the Sex Pistols, Princess Diana, the Musee D'Orsay, Grand Theft Auto, Perry Anderson, Netflix, 9/11 We are today scarcely capable of conceiving politics as a communal activity because we have become habituated to being consumers rather than citizens. Politicians treat us as consumers to whom they must deliver. Can we do anything else than suffer from buyer's remorse?
Categories: Social Science