Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric

Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric

Each paper explores the influences on different parts of Peripatetic rhetoric, its discussion of character, emotion, reason, and style, its relationships with other texts, including those of Theodectes and the Rhetorica ad Alexandrum, and ...

Author: David Mirhady

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047419525

Category: Philosophy

Page: 296

View: 799

Each paper explores the influences on different parts of Peripatetic rhetoric, its discussion of character, emotion, reason, and style, its relationships with other texts, including those of Theodectes and the Rhetorica ad Alexandrum, and its relationship with the oratory of the 4th century BC.
Categories: Philosophy

Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric

Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric

These essays study what influenced the Peripatetics. Over the last twenty years or so, there have been several attempts to describe the beginnings of rhetorical theory.1 Thomas Cole, Edward Schiappa, and Robert Wardy have all written ...

Author: David C. Mirhady

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004156685

Category: Philosophy

Page: 282

View: 492

Each paper explores the influences on different parts of Peripatetic rhetoric, its discussion of character, emotion, reason, and style, its relationships with other texts, including those of Theodectes and the Rhetorica ad Alexandrum, and its relationship with the oratory of the 4th century BC.
Categories: Philosophy

Peripatetic Rhetoric After Aristotle

Peripatetic Rhetoric After Aristotle

Contributors to this volume include Maroun Aouad, Lucia Calboli Montefusco, Thomas Conley, Tiziano Dorandi, Lawrence D. Green, Doreen C. Innes, George A. Kennedy, Michael Leff, and Eckart Schutrumpf.

Author: William Wall Fortenbaugh

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 1412830664

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 415

View: 947

Interest in ancient rhetoric and its relevance to modern society has increased dramatically over recent decades. In North America, departments of speech and communications have experienced a noticeable renaissance of concern with ancient sources. On both sides of the Atlantic, numerous journals devoted to the history of rhetoric are now being published. Throughout, Aristotle's central role has been acknowledged, and there is also a growing awareness of the contributions made by Theophrastus and the Peripatetics. Peripatetic Rhetoric After Aristotle responds to this recent interest in rhetoric and peripatetic theory. The chapters provide new insights into Peripatetic influence on different periods and cultures: Greece and Rome, the Syrian- and Arabic-speaking worlds, Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and the international scene today. Contributors to this volume include Maroun Aouad, Lucia Calboli Montefusco, Thomas Conley, Tiziano Dorandi, Lawrence D. Green, Doreen C. Innes, George A. Kennedy, Michael Leff, and Eckart Schutrumpf. This comprehensive analysis of the history of rhetoric ranges from the early Hellenistic period to the present day. It will be of significant interest to classicists, philosophers, and cultural historians.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Peripatetic Rhetoric After Aristotle

Peripatetic Rhetoric After Aristotle

The 19 essays (four not in English) are from a conference at Rutger's University in the fall of 1991. Among the topics are non-logical persuasion in Aristotle and Cicero, Dionysius, Quintilian, and the Byzantine reception of the tradition.

Author: William W. Fortenbaugh

Publisher: Transaction Pub

ISBN: 156000150X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 415

View: 974

Presents new insights into the influence of the Peripatetics on Greece and Rome, Syrian and Arabic speakers, Medieval and Renaissance Europe, and the modern international scene. The 19 essays (four not in English) are from a conference at Rutger's University in the fall of 1991. Among the topics are non-logical persuasion in Aristotle and Cicero, Dionysius, Quintilian, and the Byzantine reception of the tradition. Indexed only by sources. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Art of Rhetoric in the Roman World

The Art of Rhetoric in the Roman World

It is sometimes alleged, e.g. Marx and Leeman 92, that De inv. shows Peripatetic influences. Contemporary Peripatetic rhetoric had few distinguishing features; similarities to Aristotle and Theophrastus exist, but do not prove Cicero ...

Author: George Alexander Kennedy

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781556359798

Category: Religion

Page: 678

View: 361

Recipient of the Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit from the American Philological Association in 1975. The Goodwin Award is the only honor for scholarly achievement given by the Association. It is presented at the Annual Meeting for an outstanding contribution to classical scholarship published by a member of the association within a period of three years before the ending of the preceding calendar year. ""A remarkable and valuable achievement, balanced in judgment and attractively presented."" Journal of Roman Studies, ""This book is a reissue of the important 1972 work on the development of Greek and Latin oratory and rhetorical theory... Many students of the classics, and people interested in later European literatures as well, will find themselves turning to it again and again."" The Times Literary Supplement George A. Kennedy is Paddison Professor of Classics, Emeritus, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, an elected Member of the American Philosophical Society, and Fellow of the Rhetoric Society of America. Under Presidents Carter and Reagan Dr. Kennedy served as member of the National Humanities Council. He was earlier President of the American Philological Association and of the International Society for the History of Rhetoric. He is author of 15 books, including Classical Rhetoric and its Christian and Secular Tradition from Ancient to Modern Times, New Testament Interpretation through Rhetorical Criticism, Comparative Rhetoric: An Historical and Cross-Cultural Introduction, Aristotle On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse, and Progymnasmata: Greek Textbooks of Prose Composition, as well as numerous articles and translations into English from Greek, Latin, and French.
Categories: Religion

Greek Rhetoric of the 4th Century BC

Greek Rhetoric of the 4th Century BC

Cf. →Wareh (2012) 103–111; H. Baltussen, The Peripatetics. ... See also W. Benoit, Isocrates and Aristotle on Rhetoric, RSQ 20 (1990) 251–259; C. Balla, Isocrates, Plato, and Aristotle on ... Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric.

Author: Evangelos Alexiou

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110559958

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 377

View: 180

The interaction between orator and audience, the passions and distrust held by many concerning the predominance of one individual, but also the individual’s struggle as an advisor and political leader, these are the quintessential elements of 4th century rhetoric. As an individual personality, the orator draws strength from his audience, while the rhetorical texts mirror his own thoughts and those of his audience as part of a two-way relationship, in which individuality meets, opposes, and identifies with the masses. For the first time, this volume systematically compares minor orators with the major figures of rhetoric, Demosthenes and Isocrates, taking into account other findings as well, such as extracts of Hyperides from the Archimedes Palimpsest. Moreover, this book provides insight into the controversy surrounding the art of discourse in the rhetorical texts of Anaximenes, Aristotle, and especially of Isocrates who took up a clear stance against the philosophy of the 4th century.
Categories: Literary Criticism

A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380 1620

A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380 1620

Brian Vickers has effectively shown how great an impact the tropes and figures had on renaissance writing and on English poetry more generally.1 ... Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric (Leiden, 2007), 123–50. texts with their pupils.

Author: Peter Mack

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191619045

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 474

This is the first comprehensive History of Renaissance Rhetoric. Rhetoric, a training in writing and delivering speeches, was a fundamental part of renaissance culture and education. It is concerned with a wide range of issues, connected with style, argument, self-presentation, the arousal of emotion, voice and gesture. More than 3,500 works on rhetoric were published in a total of over 15,000 editions between 1460 and 1700. The renaissance was a great age of innovation in rhetorical theory. This book shows how renaissance scholars recovered and circulated classical rhetoric texts, how they absorbed new doctrines from Greek rhetoric, and how they adapted classical rhetorical teaching to fit modern conditions. It traces the development of specialised manuals in letter-writing, sermon composition and style, alongside accounts of the major Latin treatises in the field by Lorenzo Valla, George Trapezuntius, Rudolph Agricola, Erasmus, Philip Melanchthon, Johann Sturm, Juan Luis Vives, Peter Ramus, Cyprien Soarez, Justus Lipsius, Gerard Vossius and many others.
Categories: History

Classical Greek Rhetorical Theory and the Disciplining of Discourse

Classical Greek Rhetorical Theory and the Disciplining of Discourse

Miller, Walter, trans. 1913. Xenophon: Cyropaedia. London: William Heinemann. Mirhady,DavidC.2007.Introduction.InDavidC.Mirhady,ed. Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric: Essays in Honor of William W. Forten- baugh. Leiden: Brill; 1–18.

Author: David M. Timmerman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139485999

Category: History

Page:

View: 492

This book contributes to the history of classical rhetoric by focusing on how key terms helped to conceptualize and organize the study and teaching of oratory. David Timmerman and Edward Schiappa demonstrate that the intellectual and political history of Greek rhetorical theory can be enhanced by a better understanding of the emergence of 'terms of art' in texts about persuasive speaking and argumentation. The authors provide a series of studies to support their argument. They describe Plato's disciplining of dialgesthai into the Art of Dialectic, Socrates' alternative vision of philosophia, and Aristotle's account of demegoria and symboule as terms for political deliberation. The authors also revisit competing receptions of the Rhetoric to Alexander. Additionally, they examine the argument over when the different parts of oration were formalized in rhetorical theory, illustrating how an 'old school' focus on vocabulary can provide fresh perspectives on persistent questions.
Categories: History

Greek Rhetoric Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Greek Rhetoric  Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Influences on Peripatetic rhetoric: Essays in honor of William W. Fortenbaugh. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill. Two of the fourteen essays (by Tobias Reinhardt and Lucia Calboli Montefusco) focus on the Rhetoric to Alexander.

Author: Oxford University Press

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199803161

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 29

View: 523

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In classics, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Classics, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of classics. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Logos without Rhetoric

Logos without Rhetoric

“Techniques of Proof in 4th Century Rhetoric: Ar. Rhet. 2.23–24 and Pre-Aristotelian Rhetorical Theory.” In Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric: Essays in Honor of William W. Fortenbaugh, ed. David C. Mirhady, 87–104. Leiden: Brill.

Author: Robin Reames

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781611177695

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 236

How did rhetoric begin and what was it before it was called "rhetoric"? Must art have a name to be considered art? What is the difference between eloquence and rhetoric? And what were the differences, if any, among poets, philosophers, sophists, and rhetoricians before Plato emphasized—or perhaps invented—their differences? In Logos without Rhetoric: The Arts of Language before Plato, Robin Reames attempts to intervene in these and other questions by examining the status of rhetorical theory in texts that predate Plato's coining of the term rhetoric (c. 380 B.C.E.). From Homer and Hesiod to Parmenides and Heraclitus to Gorgias, Theodorus, and Isocrates, the case studies contained here examine the status of the discipline of rhetoric prior to and therefore in the absence of the influence of Plato and Aristotle's full-fledged development of rhetorical theory in the fourth century B.C.E. The essays in this volume make a case for a porous boundary between theory and practice and promote skepticism about anachronistic distinctions between myth and reason and between philosophy and rhetoric in the historiography of rhetoric's beginning. The result is an enlarged understanding of the rhetorical content of pre-fourth-century Greek texts. Edward Schiappa, head of Comparative Media Studies/Writing and the John E. Burchard Professor of Humanities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, provides an afterword
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Topologies as Techniques for a Post Critical Rhetoric

Topologies as Techniques for a Post Critical Rhetoric

“Techniques of Proofin 4th Century Rhetoric: Ar. Rhet. 2.23-24 and Pre-Aristotelian Rhetorical Theory.” Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric, ed. David C. Mirhady. Rickert, Thomas. 2013. Ambient Rhetoric: Attunements of Rhetorical Being.

Author: Lynda Walsh

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319512686

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 297

This book restores the concept of topology to its rhetorical roots to assist scholars who wish not just to criticize power dynamics, but also to invent alternatives. Topology is a spatial rather than a causal method. It works inductively to model discourse without reducing it to the actions of a few or resolving its inherent contradictions. By putting topology back in tension with opportunity, as originally designed, the contributors to this volume open up new possibilities for post-critical practice in “wicked discourses” of medicine, technology, literacy, and the environment. Readers of the volume will discover exactly how the discipline of rhetoric underscores and interacts with current notions of topology in philosophy, design, psychoanalysis, and science studies.
Categories: Social Science

Toward a Rhetoric of Insult

Toward a Rhetoric of Insult

I have looked at fourth-century materials in my “Topics of Vituperation: Some Commonplaces of 4th Century Oratory,” in Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric, ed. D. Mirhady (Leiden, 2007), 231–338. Anthony Corbeill's “Ciceronian Invective ...

Author: Thomas Conley

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226114798

Category: Philosophy

Page: 176

View: 590

From high school cafeterias to the floor of Congress, insult is a truly universal and ubiquitous cultural practice with a long and earthy history. And yet, this most human of human behaviors has rarely been the subject of organized and comprehensive attention—until Toward a Rhetoric of Insult. Viewed through the lens of the study of rhetoric, insult, Thomas M. Conley argues, is revealed as at once antisocial and crucial for human relations, both divisive and unifying. Explaining how this works and what exactly makes up a rhetoric of insult prompts Conley to range across the vast and splendidly colorful history of offense. Taking in Monty Python, Shakespeare, Eminem, Cicero, Henry Ford, and the Latin poet Martial, Conley breaks down various types of insults, examines the importance of audience, and explores the benign side of abuse. In doing so, Conley initiates readers into the world of insult appreciation, enabling us to regard insults not solely as means of expressing enmity or disdain, but as fascinating aspects of human interaction.
Categories: Philosophy

The Dynamics of Rhetorical Performances in Late Antiquity

The Dynamics of Rhetorical Performances in Late Antiquity

Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric: Essays in Honour of William W. Fortenbaugh, Leiden-Boston: Brill, 25–35. Schmitz, T. (1999), “Performing History in the Second Sophistic”, in M. Zimmermann (ed.), Geschichtsschreibung und politischer ...

Author: Alberto J. Quiroga Puertas

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317035015

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 815

This book argues that narrations of rhetorical performances in late antique literature can be interpreted as a reflection of the ongoing debates of the time. Competition among cultural elites, strategies of self-presentation and the making of religious orthodoxy often took the shape of narrations of rhetorical performances in which comments on the display of oratorical skills also incorporated moral and ethical judgments about the performer. Using texts from late antique authors (in particular, Themistius, Synesius of Cyrene, and Libanius of Antioch), this book proposes that this type of narrative should be understood as a valuable way to decipher the cultural and religious landscape of the fourth century AD. The volume pays particular attention to narrations of deficient rhetorical deliveries, arguing that the accounts of flaws and mistakes in oratorical displays and rhetorical performances reveal how late antique literature echoed the concerns of the time. Criticisms of deficient deliveries in different speaking occasions (declamations, public speeches, oratorical agones, school exercises, sermons) were often disguised as accusations of practising magic, heresy or cultural apostasy. A close reading of the sources shows that these oratorical deficiencies hid struggles over religious, cultural and political issues.
Categories: History

The Enthymeme

The Enthymeme

Syllogism, Reasoning, and Narrative in Ancient Greek Rhetoric James Fredal ... “The Enthymeme: Crossroads of Logic, Rhetoric, and Metaphysics. ... In Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric, edited by David C. Mirhady, 53–64. Boston: Brill.

Author: James Fredal

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271086811

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 226

View: 972

Central to rhetorical theory, the enthymeme is most often defined as a truncated syllogism. Suppressing a premise that the audience already knows, this rhetorical device relies on the audience to fill in the missing information, thereby making the argument more persuasive. James Fredal argues that this view of the enthymeme is wrong. Presenting a new exegesis of Aristotle and classic texts of Attic oratory, Fredal shows that the standard reading of Aristotle’s enthymeme is inaccurate—and that Aristotle himself distorts what enthymemes are and how they work. From close analysis of the Rhetoric, Topics, and Analytics, Fredal finds that Aristotle’s enthymeme is, in fact, not syllogistic and is different from the enthymeme as it was used by Attic orators such as Lysias and Isaeus. Fredal argues that the enthymeme, as it was originally understood and used, is a technique of storytelling, primarily forensic storytelling, aimed at eliciting from the audience an inference about a narrative. According to Fredal, narrative rather than formal logic is the seedbed of the enthymeme and of rhetoric more broadly. The Enthymeme reassesses a fundamental doctrine of rhetorical instruction, clarifies the viewpoints of the tradition, and presents a new form of rhetoric for further study and use. This groundbreaking book will be welcomed by scholars and students of classical rhetoric, the history of rhetoric, and rhetorical theory as well as communications studies, classical studies, and classical philosophy.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Demosthenes On the Crown

Demosthenes   On the Crown

Rhetorical Perspectives James J. Murphy. Yunis, Harvey. ... On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse. Translated by George A. Kennedy. 2nd ed. ... In Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric: Essays in Honor of William W. Fortenbaugh.

Author: James J. Murphy

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809335107

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 839

Demosthenes' speech On the Crown (330 B.C.E.), in which the master orator spectacularly defended his public career, has long been recognized as a masterpiece. The speech has been in continuous circulation from Demosthenes' lifetime to the present day, and multiple generations have acclaimed it as the greatest speech ever written. In addition to a clear and accessible translation, Demosthenes' "On the Crown": Rhetorical Perspectives includes eight essays that provide a thorough analysis--based on Aristotelian principles--of Demosthenes' superb rhetoric. By bringing together contextual material about Demosthenes and his speech with a translation and astute rhetorical analyses, Demosthenes' "On the Crown": Rhetorical Perspectives highlights the oratorical artistry of Demosthenes and provides scholars and students with fresh insights into a landmark speech.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

LATINITATIS RATIONES

LATINITATIS RATIONES

The metaphor after Aristotle, Influences on Peripatetic rhetoric: essays in honor of W. W. Fortenbaugh, ed. by D. C. Mirhady, 123–150. Leiden. Douglas, A. E. 1966. M. Tulli Ciceronis Brutus. Ed. and comm. Oxford.

Author: Paolo Poccetti

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110431896

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 955

View: 887

This volume assembles 50 contributions presented at the XVII International Colloquium on Latin Linguistics. They embrace essential topics of Latin linguistics with different theoretical and methodological approaches: phonetics, syntax, etymology and semantics, pragmatics and textual analysis. It is a useful resource for the study of comparative and general linguistics, not only for linguists but also for scholars of classical philology.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric and Composition

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric and Composition

2nd century C.E.) studied peripatetic philosophy before converting to rhetoric. Minucian's (fl. 253–268 C.E.) extant peripatetic-influenced "On epicheiremes" covers the three modes of proof and the topoi.

Author: Theresa Enos

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135816063

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 832

View: 890

First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Orality and Performance in Classical Attic Prose

Orality and Performance in Classical Attic Prose

'The battle exhortation in ancient rhetoric'. ... In Peripatetic rhetoric after Aristotle, edited by William W. Fortenbaugh and David C. Mirhady, 36–53, New Brunswick, NJ/ London: Transaction ... Influences on Peripatetic rhetoric.

Author: Alessandro Vatri

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192515445

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 257

This study discusses the question of whether there is a linguistic difference between classical Attic prose texts intended for public oral delivery and those intended for written circulation and private performance. Identifying such a difference which exclusively reflects these disparities in modes of reception has proven to be a difficult challenge for both literary scholars and cultural historians of the ancient world, with answers not always satisfactory from a methodological and an analytical point of view. The legitimacy of the question is first addressed through a definition of what such slippery notions as 'orality' and 'oral performance' mean in the context of classical Athens, reconstruction of the situations in which the extant prose texts were meant to be received, and an explanation of the grounds on which we may expect linguistic features of the texts to be related to such situations. The idea that texts conceived for public delivery needed to be as clear as possible is substantiated by available cultural-historical and anthropological facts; however, these do not imply that the opposite was required of texts conceived for private reception. In establishing a rigorous methodology for the reconstruction of the native perception of clarity in the original contexts of textual reception this study offers a novel approach to assessing orality in classical Greek prose through examination of linguistic and grammatical features of style. It builds upon the theoretical insights and current experimental findings of modern psycholinguistics, providing scholars with a new key to the minds of ancient writers and audiences.
Categories: History

A tiana

A  tiana

Sources for his Life, Writings, Thought and Influence. Commentary Volume 8. Sources on Rhetoric and Poetics (Texts 666-713). 2005. ISBN 90 04 14247 9 98. ... Influences on Peripatetic Rhetoric. Essays in Honor of William W. Fortenbaugh.

Author: Jaap Mansfeld

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004172067

Category:

Page: 272

View: 955

The theme of this study is the Doxography of problems in physics from the Presocratics to the early first century BCE attributed to Aëtius. Part I focuses on the argument of the compendium as a whole, of its books, of its sequences of chapters, and of individual chapters, against the background of Peripatetic and Stoic methodology. Part II offers the first full reconstruction in a single unified text of Book II, which deals with the cosmos and the heavenly bodies. It is based on extensive analysis of the relevant witnesses and includes listings of numerous doxographical-dialectical parallels in other ancient writings. This new treatment of the evidence supersedes Diels still dominant source-critical approach, and will prove indispensable for scholars in ancient philosophy.
Categories:

Emotion and the History of Rhetoric in the Middle Ages

Emotion and the History of Rhetoric in the Middle Ages

The Rhetorica ad Herennium and Cicero's De inventione are slightly too early to reflect a direct influence of Aristotle ... but at other points in the text ( 1.35.61 , 2.50.156 ) shows a mistaken understanding of Peripatetic rhetoric.41 ...

Author: Rita Copeland

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192845122

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 259

Presents a history of the ways in which authors of the Middle Ages mobilized the force of emotion in their rhetorical writings, and explores the changes that the role of emotion in rhetorical theory underwent during this period in relation to means of textual transmission and conditions of rhetorical teaching.
Categories: History