Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants

The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers

Author: Kent G. Lightfoot

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520249984

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

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Lightfoot examines the interactions between Native American communities in California & the earliest colonial settlements, those of Russian pioneers & Franciscan missionaries. He compares the history of the different ventures & their legacies that still help define the political status of native people.
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The Extraordinary Book of Native American Lists

Author: Arlene B. Hirschfelder,Paulette Fairbanks Molin

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810877090

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 383

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This is an extensively researched reference book on Native American accomplishments. Topics covered include Native American contributions to the performing arts, literature, art, history, sports, politics, education, military service, environmental issues, and many other areas. This book also features lists of Native languages, stereotypes, and myths. In addition, the authors provide a range of resources, links, and websites for readers to learn even more about each topic.
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Edible Memory

The Lure of Heirloom Tomatoes and Other Forgotten Foods

Author: Jennifer A. Jordan

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022622824X

Category: Cooking

Page: 336

View: 3216

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Each week during the growing season, farmers’ markets offer up such delicious treasures as brandywine tomatoes, cosmic purple carrots, pink pearl apples, and chioggia beets—varieties of fruits and vegetables that are prized by home chefs and carefully stewarded by farmers from year to year. These are the heirlooms and the antiques of the food world, endowed with their own rich histories. While cooking techniques and flavor fads have changed from generation to generation, a Ribston Pippin apple today can taste just as flavorful as it did in the eighteenth century. But how does an apple become an antique and a tomato an heirloom? In Edible Memory, Jennifer A. Jordan examines the ways that people around the world have sought to identify and preserve old-fashioned varieties of produce. In doing so, Jordan shows that these fruits and vegetables offer a powerful emotional and physical connection to a shared genetic, cultural, and culinary past. Jordan begins with the heirloom tomato, inquiring into its botanical origins in South America and its culinary beginnings in Aztec cooking to show how the homely and homegrown tomato has since grown to be an object of wealth and taste, as well as a popular symbol of the farm-to-table and heritage foods movements. She shows how a shift in the 1940s away from open pollination resulted in a narrow range of hybrid tomato crops. But memory and the pursuit of flavor led to intense seed-saving efforts increasing in the 1970s, as local produce and seeds began to be recognized as living windows to the past. In the chapters that follow, Jordan combines lush description and thorough research as she investigates the long history of antique apples; changing tastes in turnips and related foods like kale and parsnips; the movement of vegetables and fruits around the globe in the wake of Columbus; and the poignant, perishable world of stone fruits and tropical fruit, in order to reveal the connections—the edible memories—these heirlooms offer for farmers, gardeners, chefs, diners, and home cooks. This deep culinary connection to the past influences not only the foods we grow and consume, but the ways we shape and imagine our farms, gardens, and local landscapes. From the farmers’ market to the seed bank to the neighborhood bistro, these foods offer essential keys not only to our past but also to the future of agriculture, the environment, and taste. By cultivating these edible memories, Jordan reveals, we can stay connected to a delicious heritage of historic flavors, and to the pleasures and possibilities for generations of feasts to come.
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Reservation Reelism

Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film

Author: Michelle H. Raheja

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803268270

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 1033

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In this deeply engaging account Michelle H. Raheja offers the first book-length study of the Indigenous actors, directors, and spectators who helped shape Hollywood’s representation of Indigenous peoples. Since the era of silent films, Hollywood movies and visual culture generally have provided the primary representational field on which Indigenous images have been displayed to non-Native audiences. These films have been highly influential in shaping perceptions of Indigenous peoples as, for example, a dying race or as inherently unable or unwilling to adapt to change. However, films with Indigenous plots and subplots also signify at least some degree of Native presence in a culture that largely defines Native peoples as absent or separate. Native actors, directors, and spectators have had a part in creating these cinematic representations and have thus complicated the dominant, and usually negative, messages about Native peoples that films portray. In Reservation Reelism Raheja examines the history of these Native actors, directors, and spectators, reveals their contributions, and attempts to create positive representations in film that reflect the complex and vibrant experiences of Native peoples and communities.
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California Indians and Their Environment

An Introduction

Author: Kent Lightfoot,Otis Parrish

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520942280

Category: Nature

Page: 512

View: 4162

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Capturing the vitality of California's unique indigenous cultures, this major new introduction incorporates the extensive research of the past thirty years into an illuminating, comprehensive synthesis for a wide audience. Based in part on new archaeological findings, it tells how the California Indians lived in vibrant polities, each boasting a rich village life including chiefs, religious specialists, master craftspeople, dances, feasts, and ceremonies. Throughout, the book emphasizes how these diverse communities interacted with the state's varied landscape, enhancing its already bountiful natural resources through various practices centered around prescribed burning. A handy reference section, illustrated with more than one hundred color photographs, describes the plants, animals, and minerals the California Indians used for food, basketry and cordage, medicine, and more. At a time when we are grappling with the problems of maintaining habitat diversity and sustainable economies, we find that these native peoples and their traditions have much to teach us about the future, as well as the past, of California.
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Pablo Tac, Indigenous Scholar

Writing on Luiseño Language and Colonial History, C. 1840

Author: Lisbeth Haas

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520261895

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 267

View: 6864

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"Pablo Tac's life was both tragic and victorious, and his experiences echo down through the years, offering the light of understanding to us in our world today. A thought-provoking book and a must-read for students of indigenous California." --Ernest Siva, author of Voices of the Flute: Songs of Three Southern California Indian Nations "This is an exceptional piece of research and the definitive work on Pablo Tac. For the first time the entire corpus of the known writings of this ground-breaking Native Californian scholar are presented without editing, in their original languages (Latin, Luiseño) and in English translation. Lisbeth Haas presents a lucid and insightful account on the life, times, and significance of this important figure, while James Luna provides provocative commentary and striking images about Indian life today in the footsteps of Pablo Tac. This book belongs in the library of anyone interested in California history, Native Californians, and the Franciscan missions." --Kent Lightfoot, author of Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants: The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers "Lisbeth Haas must be praised for gathering an exceptional team of scholars for the transcription, editing, and translation of Pablo Tac's Luiseño grammar, dictionary, and history. Haas's introductory essay situates Tac in a global context, defined by the fellow students Tac found in Rome in the 1830s while studying for the priesthood. Performance artist James Luna complements Haas's lucid assessment of Tac's brilliance as an indigenous scholar with a verbal and visual testimony of shared struggles as cultural warriors." --José Rabasa, author of Without History: Subaltern Studies, the Zapatista Insurgency, and the Specter of History "The important manuscripts of the young nineteenth-century Luiseño scholar Pablo Tac are available at last to the American public, and most importantly to the people of Tac's homeland. This faithful representation and translation of his work is fascinating in its own right, and enriched further by the insightful introductions by scholar Lisbeth Haas and Luiseño artist and wordsmith James Luna. Tac interweaves his masterful linguistic description and unfinished dictionary of nineteenth-century Luiseño with an illuminating account of Luiseño life and history before and during the mission era. Haas provides an equally interesting description of the scholarly and political environment of Rome where Tac lived, learned, and created from 1834 to 1841. Luna's introduction and a foreword by the Luiseño tribal chair bring a twenty-first century indigenous interpretation to Tac's long-ago life and work. Yet there is a freshness to Tac's writing that is ageless, and makes us wish we could learn even more about this talented young man who participated in so many worlds, and whose life and career were too short." --Leanne Hinton, author of Flutes of Fire: Essays on California Indian Languages
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