Imagining the Kingdom Cultural Liturgies

Imagining the Kingdom  Cultural Liturgies

This has critical implications for how we think about Christian formation. Professors and students will welcome this work as will pastors, worship leaders, and Christian educators.

Author: James K. A. Smith

Publisher: Baker Books

ISBN: 9781441240538

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 524

How does worship work? How exactly does liturgical formation shape us? What are the dynamics of such transformation? In the second of James K. A. Smith's three-volume theology of culture, the author expands and deepens the analysis of cultural liturgies and Christian worship he developed in his well-received Desiring the Kingdom. He helps us understand and appreciate the bodily basis of habit formation and how liturgical formation--both "secular" and Christian--affects our fundamental orientation to the world. Worship "works" by leveraging our bodies to transform our imagination, and it does this through stories we understand on a register that is closer to body than mind. This has critical implications for how we think about Christian formation. Professors and students will welcome this work as will pastors, worship leaders, and Christian educators. The book includes analyses of popular films, novels, and other cultural phenomena, such as The King's Speech, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest, and Facebook.
Categories: Religion

Imagining the Kingdom

Imagining the Kingdom

This has critical implications for how we think about Christian formation. Professors and students will welcome this work as will pastors, worship leaders, and Christian educators.

Author: James K. A. Smith

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN: 0801035783

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 280

How does worship work? How exactly does liturgical formation shape us? What are the dynamics of such transformation? In the second of James K. A. Smith's three-volume theology of culture, the author expands and deepens the analysis of cultural liturgies and Christian worship he developed in his well-received Desiring the Kingdom. He helps us understand and appreciate the bodily basis of habit formation and how liturgical formation--both "secular" and Christian--affects our fundamental orientation to the world. Worship "works" by leveraging our bodies to transform our imagination, and it does this through stories we understand on a register that is closer to body than mind. This has critical implications for how we think about Christian formation. Professors and students will welcome this work as will pastors, worship leaders, and Christian educators. The book includes analyses of popular films, novels, and other cultural phenomena, such as The King's Speech, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest, and Facebook.
Categories: Religion

Imagining the Past

Imagining the Past

While the copyist's name is not preserved, his title “military scribe” accords
perfectly with the cultural milieu of New Kingdom historical fiction within the
military and foreign service (see pp. 99, 145). The only named copyist among the
corpus of ...

Author: Colleen Manassa

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199982233

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 133

Five hundred years before Homer immortalized the Trojan Horse, the ancient Egyptians had already composed a tale of soldiers hiding Ali Baba-like in baskets to capture a besieged city. Shortly after the rise to power of the warrior pharaoh Ramesses II, Egyptian authors began to write stories about battles and conquest. However, these stories were not set in the present, but in the past: they were the world's first works of historical fiction. These literary recreations of past events, which preserve fascinating mixtures of fact and fiction, provide unparalleled information about topics as diverse as ancient Egyptian historiography, religion, and notions of humor and wit. Imagining the Past is the first volume to provide complete translations and commentary for the historical fiction composed during Egypt's New Kingdom. The four works include The Quarrel of Apepi and Seqenenre, The Capture of Joppa, Thutmose III in Asia, The Libyan Battle Story. An introduction explores Egyptian conceptions of the past, the universe of historical and literary texts in New Kingdom Egypt, and the definition of a new genre of Egyptian literature. Extensive commentary and new translations appear within each chapter, and a concluding analysis summarizes the audience and function of historical fiction as well as theology and historiography within the tales. Despite the fragmentary nature of the papyrus copies, the thorough research into the literary, political, and social context of each tale allows a modern reader to explore this forgotten literary subfield and appreciate the stories as works of historical fiction.
Categories: History

Re Imagining the Church

Re Imagining the Church

In other words, we have in Jesus this intimate relationship between the good
news that the Kingdom of god has arrived, and the strategic response of
organizing a community of the Kingdom of god's presence. today we would say
that Jesus' ...

Author: Robert J. Suderman

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498290944

Category: Religion

Page: 258

View: 815

The church. What has it become? What was it meant to be? Does it pave the way or get in the way? Are we suspicious of the institutionalization of church bureaucracy? Or thrilled with the relevant impact of its presence? Robert J. Suderman writes about the church as a practitioner. His inspiration emerges out of the crossroads of biblical vision and human sincerity always tempered with frailty. Years of ministry, never a stranger to complexity, only serve to sharpen the vision of possibility. His imagination of what can be is never divorced from the realities of what is. He does not bow to the common assumption that "you can't get there from here." "Here" is the only possible point of origin for us. In his succinct, easy to understand writing style, Suderman provides insightful and thought-provoking perspectives to what it means to be the church. To be a people "called out" to participate together in God's activity in the world, and to create programs and structures needed for effective ministry are two sides of the same coin. This book is for dreamers and bureaucrats alike; indeed, it assumes that the two are indispensable pieces of God's coming presence. Introduction by: Tom Yoder Neufeld
Categories: Religion

Jesuit Accounts of the Colonial Americas

Jesuit Accounts of the Colonial Americas

Velasco's history of the Kingdom of Quito describes a cult of heroes who may
claim legitimate, authentic ownership of a ... and noble forebears, who compare
favourably with the Incas, whom Velasco portrays 83 Imagining the Kingdom of
Quito.

Author: Marc André Bernier

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442663497

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 159

In recent years scholars have turned their attention to the rich experience of the Jesuits in France and Spain’s American colonies. That attention has brought a flow of new editions and translations of Jesuit accounts of the Americas; it is now time for a study that examines the full range of that work in a comparative perspective. Jesuit Accounts of the Colonial Americas offers the first comprehensive examination of such writings and the role they played in solidifying images of the Americas. The collection also provides a much-needed re-examination of the work of the Jesuits in relation to Enlightenment ideals and the modern social sciences and humanities – two systems of thought that have in the past appeared radically opposed, but which are brought together here under the rubric of modern ethnographic knowledge. Linking Jesuit texts, the rhetorical tradition, and the newly emerging anthropology of the Enlightenment, this collection traverses the vast expanses of Old and New World France and Spain in fascinating new ways.
Categories: History

Re imagining African Christologies

Re imagining African Christologies

He is the father of lies, of perversion.62 There is consensus among the majority
ofAfrican theologians that the rule of God or the kingdom of God is the central
theme in the ministry of Jesus Christ.63 It should not be surprising then that Jesus
 ...

Author: Victor I. Ezigbo

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630878030

Category: Religion

Page: 356

View: 337

"Who do you say that I am" (Mark 8:29) is the question of Christology. By asking this question, Jesus invites his followers to interpret him from within their own contexts-history, experience, and social location. Therefore, all responses to Jesus's invitation are contextual. But for too long, many theologians particularly in the West have continued to see Christology as a universal endeavor that is devoid of any contextual influences. This understanding of Christology undermines Jesus's expectations from us to imagine and appropriate him from within our own contexts. In Re-imagining African Christologies, Victor I. Ezigbo presents a constructive exposition of the unique ways that many African theologians and lay Christians from various church denominations have interpreted and appropriated Jesus Christ in their own contexts. He also articulates the constructive contributions that these African Christologies can make to the development of Christological discourse in non-African Christian communities.
Categories: Religion

Simon Who Is Called Peter

Simon  Who Is Called Peter

On the centrality of the imagination in Christian education toward the ordering of
love, see Smith's Cultural Liturgies Project, the first two volumes of which are
Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom. 3. This title is borrowed from a
 ...

Author: Mackenzie Mulligan

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630873912

Category: Religion

Page: 138

View: 676

When we read the Bible as a parable, as a series of object lessons told merely to prove a point, we miss something. When we treat the people within the Bible as mere characters in a story, we lose something incredibly important. Object lessons are clean and simple. People, on the other hand, are messy and complicated. When we look at the life of Simon Peter, we see one of the messiest people in the entire New Testament. Peter walked on water and sank into the waves. He proclaimed who Jesus was and completely missed the point. He pledged his undying devotion to Christ, and even drew a sword in defense of his Lord, and then he abandoned Jesus and denied him three times. Peter is also the rock on which Christ would build his church--the same church of which Paul says we are a part. So come. Walk with Peter. Fish with him. Follow a strange rabbi, though it might cost you everything. Walk on water, though you might sink. Go to Jerusalem, though death awaits you. Stand with Peter as God uses him to build his church, and watch that church grow.
Categories: Religion

Restorative Christ

Restorative Christ

The consistency of Jesus' preaching of the Kingdom of God and Paul's preaching
of Christ crucified is reflected in a “redemptive solidarity” understanding of
Christ's death. This view rejects ... Smith, Imagining the Kingdom, Loc 968. 60.

Author: Geoff Broughton

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630877484

Category: Religion

Page: 204

View: 485

The conviction that Jesus is the restorative Christ demands a commitment to the justice he articulated. The justice of the restorative Christ is justice with reconciliation, justice with repentance, justice with repair, and justice without retaliation. The Gospel of Luke and the book of Acts portray the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ through the radical concept of "enemy-love." In conversation with Dietrich Bonhoeffer (Jesus-for-others), John Howard Yoder (a nonviolent Jesus), Miroslav Volf (an embracing Jesus), and Chris Marshall (a compassionate Jesus), Broughton demonstrates what the restorative Christ means for us today. Following the restorative Christ faithfully involves imaginative disciplines (seeing, remembering, and desiring), conversational disciplines (naming, questioning, and forgiving), and embodied disciplines (absorbing, repairing, and embracing).
Categories: Religion

Theology and the Future

Theology and the Future

Smith, James K. A., Imagining the Kingdom: How Worship Works, Cultural
Liturgies (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2013). Smith, Zadie, White Teeth (London:
Penguin, 2001). Song, Choan-Seng, Third-Eye Theology: Theology in Formation
in Asian ...

Author: Trevor Cairney

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780567623935

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 413

Theology was once 'queen of the sciences', the integrating centre of Christendom's conceptual universe. In our own time the very idea of systematic theology is frequently called into question, derided as an arcane and superstitious pseudo-discipline. Even within the church, it is commonly disregarded in favour of unreflective piety and pragmatism. At the same time, the southward shift in world Christianity's centre of gravity prompts crucial questions about the future form and content of theology. Within this context, Theology and the Future offers a case for the continuing viability of theology, exploring how it might adapt to changing circumstances, and discussing its implications for how we are to imagine and help shape our shared human future. Beginning with the question of God, this book explores what might be meant by 'the future of God', and what its implications are for Christian theology. Chapters follow on the location of theology (in global Christianity, the church and the academy) and on its sources and method. The second half of the book explores a wide variety of dimensions of the human future that theology might address and illuminate. The essays bring together a mix of specialist theologians and interdisciplinary thinkers to support the assertion that there can be no more critical endeavor to the future than understanding God and all things in relationship to him.
Categories: Religion

Violence Utopia and the Kingdom of God

Violence  Utopia  and the Kingdom of God

IMAGINING. THE. FUTURE-POSSIBLE. William. G. Doty. A utopian prediction in
1981 that within four years "we should be able to transmit humans around the
globe by radio scanning or an equivalently unexpected means" (Fuller 198 1)' ...

Author: Tina Pippin

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415156688

Category: Religion

Page: 157

View: 626

This controversial book explores the presence of the fantastic in Biblical and related texts, and the influence of Biblical traditions on contemporary fantasy writing, cinema, music and art. The contributors apply a variety of critical concepts and methods from the field of fantasy studies, including the theories of Tolkien, Todorov, Rosemary Jackson and Jack Zipes, to Biblical texts and challenge theological suppositions regarding the texts which take refuge in science or historiography. Violence, Utopia and the Kingdom of God presents a provocative and arresting new analysis of Biblical texts which draws on the most recent critical approaches to provide a unique study of the Biblical narrative.
Categories: Religion

Imagining Language

Imagining Language

Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive
them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation. But deliver us from
evil: For Thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

Author: Jed Rasula

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262681315

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 618

View: 766

When works such as Joyce's Finnegans Wake and Stein's Tender Buttons were first introduced, they went so far beyond prevailing linguistic standards that they were widely considered "unreadable," if not scandalous. Jed Rasula and Steve McCaffery take these and other examples of twentieth-century avant-garde writing as the starting point for a collection of writings that demonstrates a continuum of creative conjecture on language from antiquity to the present. The anthology, which spans three millennia, generally bypasses chronology in order to illuminate unexpected congruities between seemingly discordant materials. Together, the writings celebrate the scope and prodigality of linguistic speculation in the West going back to the pre-Socratics.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Imagining Religion

Imagining Religion

Biological taxonomies enumerate a graded series of hierarchical categories —
kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species — which are related and
distinguished on the basis of morphological and/or genetic features. Thus, on the
 ...

Author: Jonathan Z. Smith

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226763609

Category: Religion

Page: 165

View: 121

With this influential book of essays, Jonathan Z. Smith has pointed the academic study of religion in a new theoretical direction, one neither theological nor willfully ideological. Making use of examples as apparently diverse and exotic as the Maori cults in nineteenth-century New Zealand and the events of Jonestown, Smith shows that religion must be construed as conventional, anthropological, historical, and as an exercise of imagination. In his analyses, religion emerges as the product of historically and geographically situated human ingenuity, cognition, and curiosity—simply put, as the result of human labor, one of the decisive but wholly ordinary ways human beings create the worlds in which they live and make sense of them. "These seven essays . . . display the critical intelligence, creativity, and sheer common sense that make Smith one of the most methodologically sophisticated and suggestive historians of religion writing today. . . . Smith scrutinizes the fundamental problems of taxonomy and comparison in religious studies, suggestively redescribes such basic categories as canon and ritual, and shows how frequently studied myths may more likely reflect situational incongruities than vaunted mimetic congruities. His final essay, on Jonestown, demonstrates the interpretive power of the historian of religion to render intelligible that in our own day which seems most bizarre."—Richard S. Sarason, Religious Studies Review
Categories: Religion

A Glimpse of the Kingdom in Academia

A Glimpse of the Kingdom in Academia

Imagining a Different Kind ofInstitution Seeking first the kingdom rather than
financial profits is one countercultural theme of a Christian institution. Another
theme is developing an institutional context that embodies the values of the
kingdom.

Author: Irene Alexander

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781621895398

Category: Religion

Page: 202

View: 653

University is a major way that our society prepares professionals and leaders in education, health, government, business, arts, church--all components of our communal lives. Although the beginnings of the first universities were Christian, academia has become more and more adrift from these foundations. We have lost not only the union, the interwovenness of theological and academic understandings, but also the relational and communal process of learning which teaches students to be other-centered in their practice. A Glimpse of the Kingdom in Academia tells the story of the social sciences department of a small Christian university that took seriously the mandate to prepare their students to be salt and light in a secular society. Here are stories of the transformation in students' lives, as well as description of classroom practices, and the epistemological theory behind those practices. The book explores academic knowing, Christian worldview, relational epistemology, inner knowing, and wisdom--all ways of knowing that a Christian university should teach. The process of transformation, the context of community, and the bigger picture of life's journey and changing images of God are identified as important aspects of kingdom life in academia. The institutional setting is also critiqued with the recognition that power practices need to align with the kingdom of the Christ who emptied himself.
Categories: Religion

Imagining the Nation in Nature

Imagining the Nation in Nature

The theme of commemoration was an unfamiliar historical event—the 925
merging of the Kingdom of Lotharingia (the French called this the Duchy of
Lorraine), which had once included the Rhineland territories, with Henry I's East
Frankish ...

Author: Thomas M. LEKAN

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674040076

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 477

One of the most powerful nationalist ideas in modern Europe is the assertion that there is a link between people and their landscape. Focusing on the heart of German romanticism, the Rhineland, Thomas Lekan examines nature protection activities from Wilhelmine Germany through the end of the Nazi era to illuminate the relationship between environmental reform and the cultural construction of national identity. In the late nineteenth century, anxieties about national character infused ecological concerns about industrialization, spurring landscape preservationists to protect the natural environment. In the Rhineland's scenic rivers, forests, and natural landmarks, they saw Germany as a timeless and organic nation rather than a recently patchworked political construct. Landscape preservation also served conservative social ends during a period of rapid modernization, as outdoor pursuits were promoted to redirect class-conscious factory workers and unruly youth from "crass materialism" to the German homeland. Lekan's examination of Nazi environmental policy challenges recent work on the "green" Nazis by showing that the Third Reich systematically subordinated environmental concerns to war mobilization and racial hygiene. This book is an original contribution not only to studies of national identity in modern Germany but also to the growing field of European environmental history. Table of Contents: Introduction 1. Nature's Homelands: The Origins of Landscape Preservation, 1885-1914 2. The Militarization of Nature and Heimat, 1914-1923 3. The Landscape of Modernity in theWeimar Era 4. From Landscape to Lebensraum: Race and Environment under Nazism 5. Constructing Nature in the Third Reich Conclusion Abbreviations Notes Sources Acknowledgments Index Writing squarely within the idiom of the 'invented tradition' and the 'imagined nation,' Thomas Lekan argues that in the wake of belated unification and at a time of rapid industrialization, the German landscape came to be seen as a touchstone of national identity. He questions the idea that those engaged in landscape preservation were simply 'antimodern,' and he challenges both scholars who have seen a straightforward continuity from pre-1933 preservationist sentiment to Nazism and those who have made exaggerated claims for the Third Reich as the progenitor of modern green politics. This is a welcome contribution to the literature on local and national identity, joining works by Celia Applegate and Alon Confino, and on the environmental history of modern Germany. Both scholarly and original, Imagining the Nation in Nature is an impressive achievement. --David Blackbourn, Harvard University This important and timely book contributes to our understanding of German identity as well as to modern concepts of environmentalism and nature. Lekan's valuable contribution elucidates the modern, technocratic, and therapeutic vision of preservation that linked Weimar and the Third Reich. His analysis of Nazi bio-nature is significant and thought-provoking. --Alon Confino, University of Virginia
Categories: History

Imagining Methodism in Eighteenth Century Britain

Imagining Methodism in Eighteenth Century Britain

... I won't be rogered at this rate by any ragmatical fellow in the kingdom” (73).
However shallow her interest in Methodism may be, this Tabby is only being “
rogered” in a fiscal sense. The broad joke here targets Tabby's greed, which is in
need ...

Author: Misty G. Anderson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142140480X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 279

View: 755

In the eighteenth century, British Methodism was an object of both derision and desire. Many popular eighteenth-century works ridiculed Methodists, yet often the very same plays, novels, and prints that cast Methodists as primitive, irrational, or deluded also betrayed a thinly cloaked fascination with the experiences of divine presence attributed to the new evangelical movement. Misty G. Anderson argues that writers, actors, and artists used Methodism as a concept to interrogate the boundaries of the self and the fluid relationships between religion and literature, between reason and enthusiasm, and between theater and belief. Imagining Methodism situates works by Henry Fielding, John Cleland, Samuel Foote, William Hogarth, Horace Walpole, Tobias Smollett, and others alongside the contributions of John Wesley, Charles Wesley, and George Whitefield in order to understand how Methodism's brand of "experimental religion" was both born of the modern world and perceived as a threat to it. Anderson's analysis of reactions to Methodism exposes a complicated interlocking picture of the religious and the secular, terms less transparent than they seem in current critical usage. Her argument is not about the lives of eighteenth-century Methodists; rather, it is about Methodism as it was imagined in the work of eighteenth-century British writers and artists, where it served as a sign of sexual, cognitive, and social danger. By situating satiric images of Methodists in their popular contexts, she recaptures a vigorous cultural debate over the domains of religion and literature in the modern British imagination. Rich in cultural and literary analysis, Anderson's argument will be of interest to students and scholars of the eighteenth century, religious studies, theater, and the history of gender.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Re imagining Western European Geography in English Renaissance Drama

Re imagining Western European Geography in English Renaissance Drama

Abbot quotes Surius,18 whoreportsin his Commentaries that theEmperor
ofGermany has threecrowns: oneofsilver, representingthe Kingdom of Germany,
thesecond of iron, which isforthe Kingdom of Lombardy, and thethird ofgold, ...

Author: M. Matei-Chesnoiu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137029331

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 924

Matei-Chesnoiu examines the changing understanding of world geography in sixteenth-century England and the concomitant involvement of the London theatre in shaping a new perception of Western European space. Fresh readings are offered of Shakespeare, Jonson, Marlowe, Middleton, Dekker, Massinger, Marston, and others.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Imagining the Balkans

Imagining the Balkans

From 1918-1925 , Biondich claims , Radic pushed for this republic which was
opposed by the Kingdom's authorities because the Kingdom favored centralism
and a republic in Croatia could spell the end of the Kingdom's royalist
government ...

Author: John Anthony Kayfes

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P00786041A

Category:

Page: 500

View: 390

Categories:

Beyond Maintenance to Mission

Beyond Maintenance to Mission

Even as we human actors suspend ordinary time in favor of imagining the values
of the kingdom, God does even more. God is indeed calling the kingdom of God
into being, transforming the stuff of our lives by means of Word and Sacrament.

Author: Craig L. Nessan

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 0800631528

Category: Religion

Page: 134

View: 958

This book argues compellingly for the centrality of mission in understanding the church and provides a model for congregational leadership that will help move congregations beyond a maintenance mentality to vital engagement with the world God loves. Nessan's model of congregational leadership is strongly centered on worship life of a congregation and the entirety of the church's ministry. The chapters provide solid theological and practical direction on the themes of worship, education, fellowship, stewardship, evangelism, global connections, ecumenism, and social ministry. It is a book that will find a home in both the academy and the parish a textbook for seminarians and a guide and resource for pastors and lay congregational leaders.
Categories: Religion

Kingdom

Kingdom

Commensurate with the growth of God's rule will be the defeat of Christ's
enemies, the final conquest of the kingdom being ... of created bodies' interaction
with one another, we are incapable of imagining its existence outside of that
framework.

Author: Chris Woodall

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781621899853

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 219

It has been said that history teaches us that history teaches us nothing. However true this may be in general terms, the fact that we so frequently look to the past in an attempt to shape our future by applying its lessons in the present suggests we remain keen to learn. In the context of the subject of this book, though the stalwarts of the faith can serve as tremendous examples, it is to the lessons of Scripture that we must turn if we are to have a better idea of what the kingdom of God is, what that means for us as believers, and how we can be better equipped to extend its values in today's world. Thus, what we understand by the term "kingdom of God" will not only determine whether we believe ourselves to be its citizens, but also how we think we should conduct ourselves in the light of such knowledge. It is the contention of this book that the biblical concept of kingdom as the expression of God's rule requires greater clarity of presentation in order to prevent it from confusion and/or distortion amongst Christians.
Categories: Religion